Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation

Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation History, Hope, and Healing: Preserving and presenting the African American legacy and promoting racial reconciliation in Northern Virginia. The Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation was established in 1997 as a 501c(3) nonprofit corporation chartered in the Commonwealth of Virginia, with the following goals: • To preserve the rich cultural heritage of pioneering African Americans who fought racial segregation and established the nation’s first rural branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). • To promote understanding and respect for all people, sponsor educational and other activities designed to increase awareness for the achievements African Americans have made in Falls Church and Virginia. • To recognize the achievements of special individuals and groups by developing written materials; creating memorials and monuments; Organizing festivals, cultural events and observations and exhibitions; sponsoring workshops and seminars • To create Educational opportunities to disseminate to teachers, students and the general public the rich history of Tinner Hill and the citizens of the region providing photographic reproductions, videotaped productions, and online information services; and by any other appropriate means.

Mission: The Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation works to raise awareness of the contributions of African-Americans and other cultures to the development of Falls Church, Fairfax County, the United States, and African descendants in the diaspora, by disseminating information and by providing community services and hosting community events.

Operating as usual

On Saturday, November 7, 2020, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were elected to become the new President and Vice President o...
11/10/2020

On Saturday, November 7, 2020, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were elected to become the new President and Vice President of the United States. It was a hard won and momentous victory.

The Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation, its Board and supporters extend congratulations to the two winners but even more so to the people that made this possible -- the poll workers, the supporters, and the millions of people that voted for change. United, we can move the arc of justice forward to achieve full freedom and equality.

May this victory be the beginning of a great and pivotal change, a determined and unflinching pursuit of the promises underlying this country’s founding documents. We look forward to working with you in the pursuit of these goals.

“Together, you can redeem the soul of our nation" ~ Representative John Lewis

11/02/2020
Michael Roach featuring Sadie Roach 'A Vote For Me'

From THHF’s good friends, Michael Roach and Sadie Roach.

'A Vote For Me' featuring Sadie Roach from the album 'Tryin' Times' by Michael Roach with Sadie Roach on vocals, piano/keyboard, Roger Inniss on bass, Rod Yo...

Voter intimidation is illegal. If you're voting in person, please read, share & document any incidents. You can take a p...
11/01/2020
What to Do if You Experience Intimidation at the Polls - Advancement Project

Voter intimidation is illegal. If you're voting in person, please read, share & document any incidents. You can take a photo of your ballot & check later to see if your vote was received & recorded. Keep the phone# handy. Election Protection: 1-866-OUR-VOTE

If you’re a voter wondering what you should do if you feel intimidated or targeted at the polls, you are not alone.

Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation
10/31/2020

Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
10/30/2020

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

After the Civil War the former Confederate States passed laws intended to restrict the rights of African Americans. These “black codes” punished vagrancy, forced freedmen to sign labor contracts, and blocked their right to vote. Violators were subject to arrest, and the labor of prisoners was auctioned off to the highest bidder. In the end black codes created an oppressive system of customs and laws intended to tightly restrict the civic and economic rights of African Americans. #VoteHistory #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory

TODAY is the final day to report.  Please spread the word.
10/15/2020
English

TODAY is the final day to report. Please spread the word.

Learn about the 2020 Census - how to respond, and why it matters. Shape your future. START HERE.

It's Amazon Prime Day & your purchases can make a difference with  your purchases through Amazon Smile.  There’s no cost...
10/13/2020

It's Amazon Prime Day & your purchases can make a difference with your purchases through Amazon Smile. There’s no cost to you and THHF will reap the benefit. Select Tinner Hill as your charity of choice on your PC and download the app to your iPhone or Android…and THANKS!

Vote before Election Day! Starting Oct 14th, there will be additional early in-person voting locations throughout the co...
10/12/2020

Vote before Election Day! Starting Oct 14th, there will be additional early in-person voting locations throughout the county, with extended weekday and Saturday hours. Bring a friend and VOTE!

For more information visit fairfaxcounty.gov/elections

#NoExcuses #NAACPvotes #VoteEarly

Vote before Election Day! Starting Oct 14th, there will be additional early in-person voting locations throughout the county, with extended weekday and Saturday hours. Bring a friend and VOTE!

For more information visit fairfaxcounty.gov/elections
#NoExcuses #NAACPvotes #VoteEarly

Timeline Photos
09/16/2020

Timeline Photos

Chilly bears, a.k.a. flips, a.k.a. honeydrippers, a.k.a huckabucks, are a frozen treat that embodies the twinned culinar...
09/05/2020
Summer Is for Chilly Bears: A Frozen Treat Packed With History

Chilly bears, a.k.a. flips, a.k.a. honeydrippers, a.k.a huckabucks, are a frozen treat that embodies the twinned culinary histories of frozen desserts in America and the traditional red drinks of the African-American diaspora

Chilly bears, a.k.a. flips, a.k.a. honeydrippers, a.k.a huckabucks, are a frozen treat that embodies the twinned culinary histories of frozen desserts in America and the traditional red drinks of the African-American diaspora.

The Awakening | tawnychatmon
09/05/2020
The Awakening | tawnychatmon

The Awakening | tawnychatmon

“The Awakening” is a celebration of the beauty of Black childhood and culture, and the delicate intricacies of protecting and raising a Black child in today’s world. Loosely inspired by the work of Marianne Stokes whose portraits often showed the fine details of garments that were floor-len...

On Aug. 28, 1955, Emmett Till was brutally murdered after a white woman falsely accused him of inappropriate behavior. S...
09/02/2020

On Aug. 28, 1955, Emmett Till was brutally murdered after a white woman falsely accused him of inappropriate behavior. Sixty-five years later, his lynching stands as a harrowing example of the evils of racism, still alive today. (AOL News)

September 2, 1955: In Chicago, Mamie Till arrives at the Illinois Central Terminal to receive Emmett Till's casket.

She is surrounded by family and photographers who snap her photo collapsing in grief at the sight of the casket. His body is taken to the A. A. Rayner & Sons Funeral Home.

The Jackson [Mississippi] Daily News decries the "brutal, senseless crime" but complains that the NAACP is working "to arouse hatred and fear" by calling Till's murder a lynching.

In Belgium, the newspaper Le Drapeau Rouge (the Red Flag), publishes a brief article entitled: "Racism in the USA: A young black is lynched in Mississippi."

It's not too late!. This will take you directly to the link for your response. https://2020census.gov/en.html
09/01/2020
English

It's not too late!. This will take you directly to the link for your response. https://2020census.gov/en.html

Learn about the 2020 Census - how to respond, and why it matters. Shape your future. START HERE.

08/26/2020
She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers
08/18/2020

She Changed the World: NC Women Breaking Barriers

Cornelia Petty Jerman, leader of the North Carolina woman suffrage movement and Democratic party official, was born near Carthage in December 1874. She moved to Raleigh shortly after her marriage in 1898. She became active in the city’s social life, and was very involved with the Woman’s Club of Raleigh and state and national organizations of women’s clubs.

Jerman’s social involvement soon became political. She helped organize the Raleigh Equal Suffrage League, served as president of the North Carolina Suffrage League and lobbied the General Assembly extensively for women’s right to vote and other causes. She also helped organize, and served as president of, the Raleigh League of Women Voters.

Becoming active in Democratic Party politics after 1920, Jerman campaigned for Al Smith and Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1928 and 1932, respectively, and was appointed to a position with the Internal Revenue Service in Greensboro.

#19SuffrageStories

Friday, August 14, 5:00 -6:00 PM, along Broad Street (Route 7)The Social Justice Committee of Falls Church & Vicinity, a...
08/13/2020
Friday, August 14 - Silent Witness Against Unjust Incarceration

Friday, August 14, 5:00 -6:00 PM, along Broad Street (Route 7)The Social Justice Committee of Falls Church & Vicinity, an initiative of THHF, will join Falls Church Presbyterian and Falls Church Episcopal as faith-based communities and their neighbors continue the Silent Witness Against Racism. This week we Stand Against Unjust Incarceration.

07/31/2020

John Lewis: "Together, You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation" ~ NY Times July 30, 2020

“Though I am gone, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe."

While my time here has now come to an end, I want you to know that in the last days and hours of my life you inspired me. You filled me with hope about the next chapter of the great American story when you used your power to make a difference in our society. Millions of people motivated simply by human compassion laid down the burdens of division. Around the country and the world you set aside race, class, age, language and nationality to demand respect for human dignity. That is why I had to visit Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, though I was admitted to the hospital the following day. I just had to see and feel it for myself that, after many years of silent witness, the truth is still marching on.

Emmett Till was my George Floyd. He was my Rayshard Brooks, Sandra Bland and Breonna Taylor. He was 14 when he was killed, and I was only 15 years old at the time. I will never ever forget the moment when it became so clear that he could easily have been me. In those days, fear constrained us like an imaginary prison, and troubling thoughts of potential brutality committed for no understandable reason were the bars.

Though I was surrounded by two loving parents, plenty of brothers, sisters and cousins, their love could not protect me from the unholy oppression waiting just outside that family circle. Unchecked, unrestrained violence and government-sanctioned terror had the power to turn a simple stroll to the store for some Skittles or an innocent morning jog down a lonesome country road into a nightmare. If we are to survive as one unified nation, we must discover what so readily takes root in our hearts that could rob Mother Emanuel Church in South Carolina of her brightest and best, shoot unwitting concertgoers in Las Vegas and choke to death the hopes and dreams of a gifted violinist like Elijah McClain.

Like so many young people today, I was searching for a way out, or some might say a way in, and then I heard the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on an old radio. He was talking about the philosophy and discipline of nonviolence. He said we are all complicit when we tolerate injustice. He said it is not enough to say it will get better by and by. He said each of us has a moral obligation to stand up, speak up and speak out. When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something. Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.

Ordinary people with extraordinary vision can redeem the soul of America by getting in what I call good trouble, necessary trouble. Voting and participating in the democratic process are key. The vote is the most powerful nonviolent change agent you have in a democratic society. You must use it because it is not guaranteed. You can lose it.

You must also study and learn the lessons of history because humanity has been involved in this soul-wrenching, existential struggle for a very long time. People on every continent have stood in your shoes, though decades and centuries before you. The truth does not change, and that is why the answers worked out long ago can help you find solutions to the challenges of our time. Continue to build union between movements stretching across the globe because we must put away our willingness to profit from the exploitation of others.

Though I may not be here with you, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe. In my life I have done all I can to demonstrate that the way of peace, the way of love and nonviolence is the more excellent way. Now it is your turn to let freedom ring.

When historians pick up their pens to write the story of the 21st century, let them say that it was your generation who laid down the heavy burdens of hate at last and that peace finally triumphed over violence, aggression and war. So I say to you, walk with the wind, brothers and sisters, and let the spirit of peace and the power of everlasting love be your guide.

Join us for Silent Witness Against Racial Injustice Friday, July 31 • 5:00 - 6:00 PM Broad Street (Route 7) • Falls Chur...
07/29/2020

Join us for Silent Witness Against Racial Injustice
Friday, July 31 • 5:00 - 6:00 PM
Broad Street (Route 7) • Falls Church, VA

Rain or shine • Bring a sign &water
Wear a mask • Social distance of 6-10 feet
Parking available at Falls Church Presbyterian

From THHF & THMF, our sincere condolences to the family & friends of Dan Sze. A longtime resident of Falls Church, Sze h...
07/29/2020
F.C. Council Member Dan Sze Dies After Battle With Cancer - Falls Church News-Press Online

From THHF & THMF, our sincere condolences to the family & friends of Dan Sze. A longtime resident of Falls Church, Sze held multiple positions with the city over the years. https://fcnp.com/2020/07/28/f-c-council-member-dan-sze-dies-after-battle-with-cancer/daily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter

Highly-regarded Falls Church City Councilman Dan Sze died last night after a battle with esophageal cancer.

News outlets are reporting that "Virginia has removed from its iconic state capitol the busts and a statue honoring Conf...
07/25/2020
Virginia Evicts Confederate Monuments From Its State Capitol

News outlets are reporting that "Virginia has removed from its iconic state capitol the busts and a statue honoring Confederate generals and officials. That includes a bronze statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee..." https://www.newsmax.com/us/confederate-statues-virginia-capitol/2020/07/24/id/978923/

Virginia has removed from its iconic state capitol the busts and a statue honoring Confederate generals and officials. That includes a bronze statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee positioned in the same spot where he stood to assume command of the state's armed forces in the Civil...

07/24/2020

The Virginia Comm. for Historical Statues in the U.S. Capitol voted to recommend the removal of the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee from the Capitol's National Statuary Hall. Last night, the Fairfax County School Board, in an unanimous vote, will rename Robert E. Lee High School after civil rights icon Congressman John Lewis who died last week.

Barack Obama
07/18/2020

Barack Obama

America is a constant work in progress. What gives each new generation purpose is to take up the unfinished work of the last and carry it further - to speak out for what's right, to challenge an unjust status quo, and to imagine a better world.

John Lewis - one of the original Freedom Riders, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the youngest speaker at the March on Washington, leader of the march from Selma to Montgomery, Member of Congress representing the people of Georgia for 33 years - not only assumed that responsibility, he made it his life's work. He loved this country so much that he risked his life and his blood so that it might live up to its promise. And through the decades, he not only gave all of himself to the cause of freedom and justice, but inspired generations that followed to try to live up to his example.

Considering his enormous impact on the history of this country, what always struck those who met John was his gentleness and humility. Born into modest means in the heart of the Jim Crow South, he understood that he was just one of a long line of heroes in the struggle for racial justice. Early on, he embraced the principles of nonviolent resistance and civil disobedience as the means to bring about real change in this country, understanding that such tactics had the power not only to change laws, but to change hearts and minds as well.

In so many ways, John's life was exceptional. But he never believed that what he did was more than any citizen of this country might do. He believed that in all of us, there exists the capacity for great courage, a longing to do what's right, a willingness to love all people, and to extend to them their God-given rights to dignity and respect. And it's because he saw the best in all of us that he will continue, even in his passing, to serve as a beacon in that long journey towards a more perfect union.

I first met John when I was in law school, and I told him then that he was one of my heroes. Years later, when I was elected a U.S. Senator, I told him that I stood on his shoulders. When I was elected President of the United States, I hugged him on the inauguration stand before I was sworn in and told him I was only there because of the sacrifices he made. And through all those years, he never stopped providing wisdom and encouragement to me and Michelle and our family. We will miss him dearly.

It's fitting that the last time John and I shared a public forum was at a virtual town hall with a gathering of young activists who were helping to lead this summer's demonstrations in the wake of George Floyd's death. Afterwards, I spoke to him privately, and he could not have been prouder of their efforts - of a new generation standing up for freedom and equality, a new generation intent on voting and protecting the right to vote, a new generation running for political office. I told him that all those young people - of every race, from every background and gender and sexual orientation - they were his children. They had learned from his example, even if they didn't know it. They had understood through him what American citizenship requires, even if they had heard of his courage only through history books.

Not many of us get to live to see our own legacy play out in such a meaningful, remarkable way. John Lewis did. And thanks to him, we now all have our marching orders - to keep believing in the possibility of remaking this country we love until it lives up to its full promise.

Address


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Learn more: Our website: https://www.tinnerhill.org/ Our twitter: @tinnerhillHF Our other active Facebook Account: Tinner Hill Music Festival

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Add some Smile to Tinner Hill

Great news! You can support Tinner Hill Heritage Foundation [a 501(c)3 non-profit] with your purchases through Amazon Smile. There’s no cost to you and THHF will reap the benefit. Select Tinner Hill as your charity of choice on your PC and download the app to your iPhone or Android…and THANKS!

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My father-in-law was telling a story about collecting for the newspaper back in the 1920's. He mentioned a woman named Matilda Denny or Matilda Detty who had a sandwich shop in Tinner Hill off Annandale Road. Does anyone remember the sandwich shop or Matilda?
This is Phil's family.... His mom was a Tinner.... and I understand the first rural NAACP chapter was created here.
December 7-8, 2017 Grant Management Class Hosted by Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments