Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park

Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park preserves the site and stories of major historic events that shaped the state of Tennessee and our nation.

Operating as usual

10/07/2021

In honor of the 241st anniversary of the Battle of Kings Mountain, park staff fired a volley at 3:00 pm to commemorate the start of that decisive patriot victory and the turn of the tide in the American Revolution. HUZZAH!

Join us today, on the 241st anniversary of the Battle of Kings Mountain, for an interpretive display inside the park vis...
10/07/2021

Join us today, on the 241st anniversary of the Battle of Kings Mountain, for an interpretive display inside the park visitor center. Park staff will be available for questions and stories on this historic day!

Stop by anytime between the hours of 12:00 -4:00.

Come share in the glorious cause of liberty!

This Day in Sycamore Shoals HistoryOctober 7, 1780 - The Battle of Kings Mountain October 7, 1836 - Death of Catherine S...
10/07/2021

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
October 7, 1780 - The Battle of Kings Mountain
October 7, 1836 - Death of Catherine Sevier

After departing from Sycamore Shoals on September 26th, the Overmountain Men trekked through the mountains and foothills of North and South Carolina in pursuit of British Major Patrick Ferguson and his loyalist force. After gathering more militia support along the way, they finally encountered Ferguson on October 7th at Kings Mountain. The battle lasted just over an hour, and when the smoke had cleared Ferguson was dead and his loyal militia defeated. Twenty-eight patriot lives were lost in the engagement. Historians have called the battle of Kings Mountain the turning point of the Revolutionary War.

In a somewhat odd twist of fate, Catherine “Bonny Kate” Sevier, wife of Col. John Sevier who fought at the battle, passed away on October 7th, 1836 the 56th anniversary of the battle of Kings Mountain.

10/06/2021

Down The Trail!
Day 9
10 miles

The Patriot frontiersmen finally approached what they thought was Ferguson’s headquarters: the well-known plantation known as Gilbert Town, just north of current Rutherfordton, North Carolina. They were disappointed however to learn that Ferguson had left several days prior and had escaped them for now.

One of the trailing additional groups, William Chronicle and a small force, are able to join the Overmountain and Yadkin Valley Men at Probit’s Ford, but the other nearby groups gathered together to plan their next move.

The Georgia Patriot Elijah Clarke heard about the combined militias chasing Patrick Ferguson and spared 30 men under William Candler to meet with them and help with the pursuit.

#DownTheTrail #OVNHT #OVTA #OVT #OvermountainVictory #southerncampaign #Liberty #FindYourPark #EncuentraTuParque #NationalParkService #NationalTrailsSystem #AmericanRevolution #RevolutionaryWar #AmericanHistory

Image: A black metal sign on a white post stands in front of a green meadow. The field is a steep rolling hill, closely edged in by mature tall trees covered in bright green leaves. The sign reads in white letters "King's Mountain Campaign." Photo: NPS.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History September 26, 1780The Overmountain Men Depart Sycamore Shoals On the morning of Sept...
09/27/2021

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 26, 1780
The Overmountain Men Depart Sycamore Shoals

On the morning of September 26th, the Overmountain militia were addressed by Reverend Samuel Doak with a stirring sermon and prayer in which he beseeched the men to "Wield the sword of the Lord and of Gideon". With their powder horns topped off with Mary Patton's gun powder, and the words of Reverend Doak resounding in their minds the Overmountain men set out from Sycamore Shoals in their search for Major Patrick Ferguson.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 26, 1780
The Overmountain Men Depart Sycamore Shoals

On the morning of September 26th, the Overmountain militia were addressed by Reverend Samuel Doak with a stirring sermon and prayer in which he beseeched the men to "Wield the sword of the Lord and of Gideon". With their powder horns topped off with Mary Patton's gun powder, and the words of Reverend Doak resounding in their minds the Overmountain men set out from Sycamore Shoals in their search for Major Patrick Ferguson.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History September 25, 1780Muster of the Overmountain MenFollowing a threat of annihilation b...
09/25/2021

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 25, 1780
Muster of the Overmountain Men

Following a threat of annihilation by British Major Patrick Ferguson, militia leaders in the overmountain settlements devise a plan to gather a frontier army and go in search of Ferguson and his loyalist forces. The muster date was set for Sept. 25th and on that day roughly 1,000 men answered the call. These men were under the command of Col. William Campbell of Washington Co. VA, Col. Isaac Shelby of Sullivan Co. NC, Lt. Col John Sevier of Washington Co. NC, Charles McDowell of Burke Co. NC, and Col. Andrew Hampton of Rutherford Co. NC. Oral tradition states that every seventh man was chosen to stay behind and protect the settlements as a home guard. As evening approached and campfires were kindled the militiamen settled in for what was probably a restless night full of anxious anticipation as the hunt for Ferguson would begin the following day.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 25, 1780
Muster of the Overmountain Men

Following a threat of annihilation by British Major Patrick Ferguson, militia leaders in the overmountain settlements devise a plan to gather a frontier army and go in search of Ferguson and his loyalist forces. The muster date was set for Sept. 25th and on that day roughly 1,000 men answered the call. These men were under the command of Col. William Campbell of Washington Co. VA, Col. Isaac Shelby of Sullivan Co. NC, Lt. Col John Sevier of Washington Co. NC, Charles McDowell of Burke Co. NC, and Col. Andrew Hampton of Rutherford Co. NC. Oral tradition states that every seventh man was chosen to stay behind and protect the settlements as a home guard. As evening approached and campfires were kindled the militiamen settled in for what was probably a restless night full of anxious anticipation as the hunt for Ferguson would begin the following day.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History September 24, 1815Death of John SevierJohn Sevier is most closely associated with Sy...
09/24/2021

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 24, 1815
Death of John Sevier

John Sevier is most closely associated with Sycamore Shoals as the commander of the Washington Co. NC Militia which he mustered at the Shoals along with other militia units that subsequently defeated Maj. Patrick Ferguson at the Battle of Kings Mountain in South Carolina.

Throughout the 1780s and 90s Sevier launched campaigns against the Cherokee which resulted in the destruction of several Cherokee towns in present day Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia.
He served as the only governor of the short-lived State of Franklin, an early attempt at statehood by the overmountain settlers. This movement resulted in the Battle of Franklin at John Tipton’s farm in present day Johnson City, TN from which Sevier retreated leaving behind casualties and several captured including two of his sons. In a last ditch effort to save the State of Franklin, Sevier entertained the idea of allying with Spain, but the ill fated state soon dissolved.

After swearing allegiance back to North Carolina, he later represented Greene Co. and eventually the state’s 5th congressional district in the first US Congress. He served as brigadier general of the Southwest Territory militia during the early 1790s, and later served six two-year terms as Tennessee's governor: from 1796 to 1801, and 1803 to 1809. After his last term as governor, Sevier was elected to three terms in the United States House of Representatives from Tennessee, serving from 1811 until his death in 1815.

John Sevier died in the Alabama Territory while conducting a survey and was buried along the Tallapoosa River near Fort Decatur. In 1889, at the request of Governor Robert Love Taylor, his remains were re-interred in the Knox County Courthouse lawn in Knoxville. A monument was placed on the grave in 1893. In 1922, the remains of his second wife, Catherine Sherill, were re-interred next to Sevier's. A monument recognizing his first wife, Sarah Hawkins, was placed at the site in 1946.

To learn about Sevier’s early life read yesterday’s post on his birthday.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 24, 1815
Death of John Sevier

John Sevier is most closely associated with Sycamore Shoals as the commander of the Washington Co. NC Militia which he mustered at the Shoals along with other militia units that subsequently defeated Maj. Patrick Ferguson at the Battle of Kings Mountain in South Carolina.

Throughout the 1780s and 90s Sevier launched campaigns against the Cherokee which resulted in the destruction of several Cherokee towns in present day Tennessee, North Carolina, and Georgia.
He served as the only governor of the short-lived State of Franklin, an early attempt at statehood by the overmountain settlers. This movement resulted in the Battle of Franklin at John Tipton’s farm in present day Johnson City, TN from which Sevier retreated leaving behind casualties and several captured including two of his sons. In a last ditch effort to save the State of Franklin, Sevier entertained the idea of allying with Spain, but the ill fated state soon dissolved.

After swearing allegiance back to North Carolina, he later represented Greene Co. and eventually the state’s 5th congressional district in the first US Congress. He served as brigadier general of the Southwest Territory militia during the early 1790s, and later served six two-year terms as Tennessee's governor: from 1796 to 1801, and 1803 to 1809. After his last term as governor, Sevier was elected to three terms in the United States House of Representatives from Tennessee, serving from 1811 until his death in 1815.

John Sevier died in the Alabama Territory while conducting a survey and was buried along the Tallapoosa River near Fort Decatur. In 1889, at the request of Governor Robert Love Taylor, his remains were re-interred in the Knox County Courthouse lawn in Knoxville. A monument was placed on the grave in 1893. In 1922, the remains of his second wife, Catherine Sherill, were re-interred next to Sevier's. A monument recognizing his first wife, Sarah Hawkins, was placed at the site in 1946.

To learn about Sevier’s early life read yesterday’s post on his birthday.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History September 23, 1745Birthday of John SevierBorn in Augusta County, Virginia, near what...
09/23/2021

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 23, 1745
Birthday of John Sevier

Born in Augusta County, Virginia, near what is now the town of New Market, John Sevier was the oldest of seven children of Valentine Sevier and Joanna Goad. His father had immigrated from England to Baltimore in 1740 and gradually made his way to the back country and Shenandoah Valley. At an early age, he opened his own tavern, and helped found New Market.
In 1761 at age 16, Sevier married Sarah Hawkins and initially settled into a life of farming. Sevier served as a captain in the Virginia colonial militia, under George Washington, in Lord Dunmore's War in 1773 and 1774.

John Sevier eventually settled in what is now Northeast, TN. Among his many patriotic adventures and not-so-savory exploits he is most closely associated with Sycamore Shoals in that he served on the court of the Watauga Association, defended Fort Watauga during the siege of 1776, and mustered the Washington Co. NC militia here as part of the force gathered to answer Maj. Patrick Ferguson’s threat to the overmountain people.

This Day in Sycamore Shoals History
September 23, 1745
Birthday of John Sevier

Born in Augusta County, Virginia, near what is now the town of New Market, John Sevier was the oldest of seven children of Valentine Sevier and Joanna Goad. His father had immigrated from England to Baltimore in 1740 and gradually made his way to the back country and Shenandoah Valley. At an early age, he opened his own tavern, and helped found New Market.
In 1761 at age 16, Sevier married Sarah Hawkins and initially settled into a life of farming. Sevier served as a captain in the Virginia colonial militia, under George Washington, in Lord Dunmore's War in 1773 and 1774.

John Sevier eventually settled in what is now Northeast, TN. Among his many patriotic adventures and not-so-savory exploits he is most closely associated with Sycamore Shoals in that he served on the court of the Watauga Association, defended Fort Watauga during the siege of 1776, and mustered the Washington Co. NC militia here as part of the force gathered to answer Maj. Patrick Ferguson’s threat to the overmountain people.

The Taylor House recently recieved a good exterior wash down and is gleaming on top of Sabine Hill. We have also added a...
09/16/2021

The Taylor House recently recieved a good exterior wash down and is gleaming on top of Sabine Hill. We have also added a beautiful reproduction late 18th/early 19th century sofa to the West Room.

Upcoming tours of Sabine Hill State Historic Site...
Saturday, September 25th - 11:00 am
Saturday, October 16th & 30th - 11:00 am

Pre-registration and fee required
https://tnstateparks.com/parks/events/sycamore-shoals

09/16/2021

Due to the rising numbers of Covid-19 cases in our area, and the inability to offer proper social distancing for this particular program, we have made the unfortunate but necessary decision to cancel the Lanterns & Legends Candlelight Tours originally scheduled for the evening of September 25th. The safety of our guests, volunteers, and park staff are always of utmost importance.

The Overmountain Muster and River Crossing events, set to take place throughout the day on September 25th and 26th, will continue as scheduled. These events are held entirely outdoors and individual social distancing is easily achieved. Thank you for your patience and understanding as we navigate these uncertain times.

“Its not about the Destination, It's about the journey.”-Ralph Waldo EmersonPhoto credit: Emry Lee Photography
09/13/2021

“Its not about the Destination, It's about the journey.”
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Photo credit: Emry Lee Photography

“Its not about the Destination, It's about the journey.”
-Ralph Waldo Emerson

Photo credit: Emry Lee Photography

09/01/2021

All the Monarch Caterpillars in our visitor center have went into chrysalis. In approximately 10 days, the Monarch Butterflies will be emerging to take part in the great migration to Mexico. Stop by to check them out!

It is with sadness that we say goodbye to our dear friend and Liberty cast member, Dusty Sayers.  Each summer, for over ...
08/30/2021

It is with sadness that we say goodbye to our dear friend and Liberty cast member, Dusty Sayers.  Each summer, for over 25 years, Dusty has devotedly portrayed Reverend Samuel Doak during the Liberty drama. With an energy and a passion unlike any other, he inspired a multitude of park guests to love the history of the Watauga settlement.  Now, we pray, as did Reverend Doak on the morning of September 26, 1780, "Thou who promised to protect a sparrow in its flight, keep ceaseless watch by day and by night over Dusty's loved ones."

It is with sadness that we say goodbye to our dear friend and Liberty cast member, Dusty Sayers.  Each summer, for over 25 years, Dusty has devotedly portrayed Reverend Samuel Doak during the Liberty drama. With an energy and a passion unlike any other, he inspired a multitude of park guests to love the history of the Watauga settlement.  Now, we pray, as did Reverend Doak on the morning of September 26, 1780, "Thou who promised to protect a sparrow in its flight, keep ceaseless watch by day and by night over Dusty's loved ones."

Photos from Indian Creek Productions, Inc's post
08/27/2021

Photos from Indian Creek Productions, Inc's post

08/25/2021
Cherokee Heritage Day

Join us on August the 28th at Sycamore Shoals!

Indian Creek Productions, Inc

Sycamore Shoals is forever linked with the rich traditions and influence of the Native Cherokee. Join us for a day devoted to sharing Cherokee history and culture through traditional arts and historical presentations. Activities include traditional Cherokee dance, music, language, cooking demonstrations, and skills such as basketmaking, finger weaving, beadwork, and woodcarving. Contact the park for a detailed schedule.

Pre registration not required

Adults - $6.00
Ages 7 to 17 years - $3.00
6 and under free

Photos from Indian Creek Productions, Inc's post
08/24/2021

Photos from Indian Creek Productions, Inc's post

08/24/2021

Ray McCoy: "Ray first learned woodcarving from his father. In school he learned to do stone carvings from the late Amanda Crowe. Carving animals is mostly what he does. He learned to carve some basket handles as well as doing some flintknapping. Most of his wood carvings are of black walnut and wild cherry."

Visit with Ray and many other demonstrators at Cherokee Heritage Day, Saturday, August 28, 2021, at Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park in Elizabethton, TN.

08/24/2021
National honey Bee Day

Happy belated National Honey Bee Day!

Although we are a few days behind it’s always honey bee day here at Sycamore Shoals. Check out this video of our active bees early this morning bringing in pollen.

Have you ever seen honey bees use their pollen sacs or corbicula to collect and carry pollen?

Join us Saturday, August 28th to meet potter, Bradley Welch, and a host of other demonstrators and program presentations...
08/20/2021

Join us Saturday, August 28th to meet potter, Bradley Welch, and a host of other demonstrators and program presentations, for our 1st Annual Cherokee Heritage Day, from 10 am - 5 pm. Please call the park for additional information - 423-543-5808.

“Siyo my name is Bradley Welch. I am a 26-year-old and an enrolled member of the EBCI. I belong to the Paint Clan. I learned to make pottery from watching my two grandmothers. I watched their techniques and the way they worked the clay from start to finish. I began attempting to make my own. I am still learning but love what I do.” Join Bradley and many other demonstrators and presenters at the first annual Cherokee Heritage Day at Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park in Elizabethton, TN, on Saturday, August 28th.

Address

1651 W Elk Ave
Elizabethton, TN
37643

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 4pm
Tuesday 9am - 4pm
Wednesday 9am - 4pm
Thursday 9am - 4pm
Friday 9am - 4pm
Saturday 9am - 4pm
Sunday 1pm - 4:30pm

Telephone

(423) 543-5808

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Sycamore Shoals State Historic Park posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Elizabethton

Show All

Comments

Great place to explore history!
Trade Tn is having a festival Trade Mill & Native Heritage Days Sep 19th & 20th 2020. Is there anyone that would like to come dressed in period clothing?
Well preserved, beautiful area, trails and river walk, spent alot time exoring the area
I wish to thank folks of Sycamore Shoals for making me feel welcome while participating in the event “Seize of Fort Watauga”. This was my first time attending this park and event. I had a great time and will be back.
Is it true that this park, as well as Carter Mansion, is going to start charging a fee to photographers for taking pictures on the properties???
My family and I plan on being in TN the week of May 25th through June 1st. I am trying to plan what day would be best to visit Sycamorr Shoals. The online calendar does not have anything listed for that week. What do you recommend?