Kansas Oil Museum

Kansas Oil Museum 100 Years of History on 10 Acres! The rich history of Butler County and El Dorado come alive at the Butler County History Center and Kansas Oil Museum.
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Visit the museum today for inspiring exhibits on the Flint Hills, the history of Kansas oil discovery, and much more. An outdoor Oil Boom Town represents the height of 1920s oil towns that sprang up overnight to provide housing for the droves of people that came to Butler County to find their fortunes in black gold. Working antique oil equipment is featured on the ten-acre grounds as well as the oldest log cabin in the county, a garage full of early 20th century automobiles, and stately representations of our beautiful state tree, the Cottonwood. Indoors, our main gallery boasts a stunning exhibition on the Flint Hills, Butler County history, and oil development. The Rolla A. Clymer Research Library serves as a valuable research tool for anyone looking for more information about family, local, or state history. A small admission is charged to see the museum. Our museum is wheelchair accessible, although some outdoor buildings are not.

Operating as usual

11/25/2020

Albert Hogoboom was a big part of the El Dorado and Butler County community. Tonight, hear from Albert's daughter and son in law, Kathy and Loren Jack, the current owners and operations of Hogoboom Oilfield Trucking.

Enjoy and thanks to Loren, Kathy and the Hogoboom family.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liWTLZd2KAo

11/24/2020

Join us tonight at 7 as we share the story of Albert Hogoboom, shared by Loren and Kathy Jack, the daughter and son in law of Mr. Hogoboom. Loren and Kathy now run Albert Hogoboom Oilfield Trucking. The company started in 1956 but the Hogoboom family has had a great impact upon El Dorado as well as the Oil industry.

As you watch our video tonight, please like our page, our YouTube page and share it with others. We've done several interviews this year with people in Butler County and about Butler County and we'll be sharing parts of those interviews on our YouTube page in the months and years to come. Once you can return to our museum, you'll also be able to watch and access full interviews that we're conducted by the museum from 1995-2005 with countless Butler County citizens.

As a “Thank You” to those who served there are new policies in place at our museum. 1st, there’s a new parking place res...
11/11/2020

As a “Thank You” to those who served there are new policies in place at our museum.
1st, there’s a new parking place reserved for Veterans marked with a sign.
2nd, this week during our open to the public hours, Thursday & Friday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm and Saturday 12:00 noon to 5:00 pm Veterans will enjoy free admission to the museum.
3rd, Veterans receive half price admissions (Butler Co Resident price) to the museum when they visit at other times.

Known as the “Flower of Remembrance”, the red poppy  was adopted as the official memorial flower. This comes from the po...
11/11/2020

Known as the “Flower of Remembrance”, the red poppy was adopted as the official memorial flower. This comes from the poem “In Flanders Fields” by John McCrae written in 1915. McCrae was a Canadian doctor and teacher serving in WWI. The day before he wrote the poem, one of his closest friends was killed. His friend was buried in a shallow grave with a makeshift wooden cross. Wild poppies were beginning to blossom in the field.
The stark contrast between natural life and death through battle gave McCrae the inspiration to write this poem and to give a voice to all who died on the battlefield.

Join us tonight at 7 pm as we share an interview with John Schuster. The Schuster family was a rare group of folks in th...
11/10/2020

Join us tonight at 7 pm as we share an interview with John Schuster.

The Schuster family was a rare group of folks in the Oil industry. John's grandfather and father made, developed and participated in the use of nitroglycerine to "shoot" oil wells. An extremely dangerous and possibly very lucrative profession. They worked throughout the Midwest and had a nitro factory in Pawhuska, Oklahoma. John participated in these shoots and rode with his father on several jobs until the family got out of the business in the mid 1960s. John donated the truck that his dad used to the Kansas Oil Museum and it is now on display here at the museum. To our knowledge, it is one of only two at a museum that can be viewed. In the past six months, we have conducted countless interviews with the people of Butler County and those involved in the Oil Industry. These interviews will be preserved as part of our mission and you will have the opportunity to come and listen to these unique and one of a kind voices. Join us tonight at 7 as you hear from one of the last Nitroglycerine "shooters."

In 1845, Congress established Election Day. Tuesday was selected for a specific reason. Any guesses on why?The selected ...
11/03/2020

In 1845, Congress established Election Day. Tuesday was selected for a specific reason. Any guesses on why?

The selected items are from the Butler County Historical Society collections and include a 1910s ballot box from Spring township and a 1902 general ballot from Rosalia Township.

10/31/2020

And we have a winner...

Lined up and enjoying trick or treating on a beautiful fall evening
10/31/2020

Lined up and enjoying trick or treating on a beautiful fall evening

10/31/2020

Socially distanced Trick or Treat event going on now till 6pm.

This story was submitted by Suzanne Rausch.I live in the old poor farm. The building was originally built in 1898 as an ...
10/31/2020

This story was submitted by Suzanne Rausch.
I live in the old poor farm. The building was originally built in 1898 as an infirmary. The house is on top of a hill, and there are long porches on the west side where they would wheel patients outside for a breath of fresh air.
In 1926, a large front room was added onto the house. Bathrooms were installed and so was electricity.
That's when it became a poor farm. Before welfare, if people couldn't afford to support themselves, they would move to the poor farm. Work would be arranged for them, and half of the money that they earned would go to the poor farm for their upkeep while they kept the other half. There was 25 bedrooms in the house. The north and south wings held 11 bedrooms each with a bathroom at the end of the hall with multiple stalls which were communal. The three bedrooms upstairs belonged to the caretaker and his family.
In WWII, it was a prisoner of war camp. There was no fence, because none of the prisoners wanted to escape and rejoin the war effort in a more active role.
In the 1960's, it was turned into a nursing home. Two more smaller houses were brought in across the drive way.
In the 1980s, it was converted into a private home with a daycare in the basement.
We bought it in 1999.
Immediately, I would have strangers come up to me at WalMart and offer to exorcise the house for me for free. I also had several people tell me that their elderly relatives died in my house.
I went on a walking tour that the Oil Museum held a few years ago in October. The guide spoke of all the grisly murders that had occurred in the downtown area of El Dorado. One of the ladies in the group was taking pictures of the night sky. I was curious, so I approached her and asked her what she was taking pictures of.
"Spirit balls." She told me. She went on to show me the evidence of several tiny balls of light surrounding and above the buildings our guide was showing us. I took several of my own. There were at lease 2 or 3 balls of light around every building on the tour. When we went back home, I took pictures of my house. There were dozens if not hundreds of balls of light above my house! I took pictures of the little houses across the driveway, and there were about a dozen spheres above them!
Later, I had a friend, Chriss, offer to bring her Ouija board over and try to contact some of the spirits. I agreed. We both put our fingers on the pointer, and it moved across the board to say that we had over 2500 ghosts living in our house. I thought she was pushing it around to make things more interesting. She left the room to take a phone call, and I sat back in my chair. The pointer moved all on its own!
There is no heating or air conditioning in the north wing. We use it mostly for storage. There have been several times in the smoldering heat of summer when I have been walking down the hall to get something, and a small puff of frigid air had gone through me.
I have had several carpenters who have worked on my house tell me that they felt something in the basement. One could hear breathing. I have heard a heartbeat.
My friend, Sharon, has said she saw an old man shuffling down the hall. He looked at me, and I looked up right where he was, but I didn't see him.
Doors across the room open slowly or slam shut, and there is no one else home but me. One time I heard a dead bolt turn on the door to the back porch and it swung open.
Once when I had been dozing in front of the television late at night, I awoke to see a wind-up toy walking across the floor. I was alone in the house.
My children have woken up in the night several times, and have seen what they call shadow people standing at the foot of their beds. My children tell them to leave, and they do.
I don't know if something or someone or multiple entities are living in our house with us, but they have never harmed us in any way, so I say live and let live!

(Picture shown is from The El Dorado Times Sept 26, 1974.)

More good news for tricker treaters at the Museum October 31 at 4:00 - 6:00 pm. Come out and you have a chance to win a ...
10/31/2020

More good news for tricker treaters at the Museum October 31 at 4:00 - 6:00 pm. Come out and you have a chance to win a FREE one year Family Museum Membership sponsored by the Stephanie Thomas Agency, American Family Insurance. ($35 Value) All participants have a special one night only discounted Membership opportunity.
Drawing at 6:00 pm.
No trick! This treat is another fun part of our “old fashioned” candy sticks & vintage style postcards Halloween giveaway.
We will be following safety guidelines and ask that you do too please!
See you at the Museum, 383 East Central, El Dorado.

This may be the most unique Halloween in history, so what better way to celebrate than by stopping by your Museum to Tri...
10/30/2020

This may be the most unique Halloween in history, so what better way to celebrate than by stopping by your Museum to Trick or Treat?!?
We will be set up outside by our front door with “old fashioned” stick candy & postcards depicting the history of Butler County & the Oil Industry.
Each tricker treater will receive 2 yummy sticks of candy and a fun postcard until 6:00 pm or our supply is deleted. (Please be sure to tell us your favorite flavors!)
We will follow safety guidelines & ask that you do too please.
We are at 383 E. Central, El Dorado. Look for the big bison statue with a mask!
See you Saturday, Oct 31 from 4:00 - 6:00 pm!

This “spirited” story was submitted by Eddie Stackley of El Dorado.HAUNTED HOUSE ON PINE STREET Back in the late 1990's ...
10/30/2020

This “spirited” story was submitted by Eddie Stackley of El Dorado.

HAUNTED HOUSE ON PINE STREET

Back in the late 1990's I was getting ready to move into a charming, older craftsman style home to rent. There was a mature canopy of trees that hung over the front porch. The small yard was manicured by a neighbor who took care of several landscapes on the block. It was a quaint, cozy home for me and my youngest son.

Before we moved in I had heard of several happenings that occurred with previous reputable renters. Most started, "did you know that house was haunted?'' We were not deterred.

One "haunting" was from a young, single woman employed at Butler Community College. She had gone out one evening, leaving the house with everything in order. When she returned later that night, the pictures hanging on her walls were no longer hanging on the walls. She didn't recall an earthquake or storm or such an unsettling that would cause this. Instead, she found the frames not in a pile, none broken, but neatly up against the wall, setting on the floor as if they had been taken down and placed with care. I was told there were other incidents that had occurred while she lived there but I don't recall knowing the stories.
The couple who lived there after her, also told of an unexplained "haunting" late one night after going to bed. They had a new baby and would turn a musical mobile on to help her go to sleep. After all had settled in and was quiet, they woke up to music coming from the nursery. Knowing the mobile had stopped earlier, they went to find out what was happening. When they entered the room, the baby was sound asleep, all was well and in place, but the musical mobile was playing. They too believed there was something strange taking place in their home that they couldn’t explain.

As I was moving in, there were guys moving stuff out from the previous renter for a sale. I knew one of the young men helping carry boxes up from the basement. A strong athlete, not someone who might have difficulty with the task, kept tripping up the stairs. They were all laughing how he was stumbling in the same spot. The stairs were sturdy and no one else seemed to be having the same problem. He later told me it felt like something or somebody would grab his ankle as he stepped up a certain place on the staircase.

After getting settled into our cozy house, I thought it strange how many pennies I would find on the floor as I swept the carpet. There was an inch edge on the floor molding, so I would set the pennies on the ledge. The next time I swept, I would find more pennies on the floor. I thought my son was playing a prank on me. When I asked him if he had knocked the pennies off, he said "no Mom, see, the pennies are still on the ledge". And so they were. We continued to stack pennies until they would fall over and would put them in a jar. I had to jest that the carpet was growing pennies.

Unfortunately, I barely recall stories preceding our stay, of a little girl who once lived in this house. There were no tragedy or “untimely” happenings to the stories, just something of a little girl’s presence.

Strange, but not frightening, we were never afraid. In fact it was almost a comforting presence that we were content with.

This story was submitted by Sheila Yrjanainen, Customer Service Representative at Coutts Museum of Art.   The Coutts Mus...
10/29/2020

This story was submitted by Sheila Yrjanainen, Customer Service Representative at Coutts Museum of Art.
The Coutts Museum of Art is housed in a very grand, 103-year-old building. Many visitors have asked if the building is haunted. If I tell them “yes”, then the experience becomes more about the building’s history than the wonderful art we have on exhibit here. I understand art and history do have a romance, but if I answer that I feel it is haunted, do I lose credibility? I won’t talk about it unless someone asks.
So because I am asked, I reply that we definitely have “paranormal” activity happening in this building. I am good at figuring out weird noises and strange bumps without assigning it to ghosts. This building conducts sounds from outside and projects them up on the third floor, so I have gotten used to that. Pigeons on the roof sound like people having a conversation when no one is there. The third floor, west room is pitch black with the lights out, even during the daytime. Despite being armed with the ability to reason, some things cannot be explained.
A visiting family talked to a man on the third floor. There was no one else in the building but the director and myself. Papers shuffle in the second floor office any time it is empty. I haven’t solved that one yet. The alarm goes off several times a week for no reason. We have had the security people here A LOT, still not sure if that one is paranormal, but they cannot figure it out. A small boy visiting with his family got shushed by his mother for telling me he saw a shadow person.
There are two people who have had a deep connection to this building, Warren Hall Coutts, Jr and John Bunyan Adams. Our building started life out as a bank in 1917. It was the Butler County State Bank. John Bunyan Adams was the bank president. On March 12 of 1921, Mr. Adams shot himself four times, near his heart, in this building. He died seven hours later at the local hospital.
Mr. Coutts bought this building in 1963. He and his son ”Bud” were attorneys and were starting a new venture together. The sign above our door still says “Coutts and Coutts, Lawyers.” Sadly, Bud was killed in a plane crash January 22, 1964. Mr. Coutts memorialized his son by creating this wonderful museum we have now. Mr. Coutts passed away in1988.
Could one of those men be the cause of our mysterious occurrences? I guess we will never know. Come and visit our wonderful museum for the art exhibits, enjoy the history of the building, and if you talk to a strange man on the third floor, please take his picture, just in case….

In the "spirit" of Halloween, we will be posting stories shared with us about various buildings and homes in the area th...
10/29/2020

In the "spirit" of Halloween, we will be posting stories shared with us about various buildings and homes in the area that have a spooky twist.

Read along with us over the next few days and enjoy!

You don't have to go out tonight in the bad weather. Join us right here on our page at 7 pm as our volunteer Ca...
10/27/2020

You don't have to go out tonight in the bad weather. Join us right here on our page at 7 pm as our volunteer Carol Turner gives us a tour of the Grandma Anderson house on the grounds of the Kansas Oil Museum and Butler County History Center.

10/22/2020

The Butler County Historical Society needs your help.
We are currently in search of photos showing housing provided to railroad workers in El Dorado. It may have been known as Tower B housing. From descriptions shared there were 3-4 small yellow houses located off of Oak St between 10th and 11th.
Please contact [email protected] if you have photos you are willing to share/donate.

10/13/2020
Rachelle Meinecke

Rachelle Meinecke, Director of the Lowell Holmes Museum of Anthropology and native Augustan discusses the history of Augusta, Butler County, KS.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-eBvmgxV0f4

Anthropologist and historian Rachelle Meinecke discusses the history of Augusta, Butler County, Kansas

10/13/2020

Tune in tonight at 7 pm, as Rachelle Meinecke, Director of the Lowell Holmes Museum at Wichita State discusses the history of Augusta. Another talk in our year long speaker series on Butler County.

If you miss the talk, you can check out our Kansas Oil Museum YouTube page for Rachelle's talk and other talks as well.

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383 E Central Ave
El Dorado, KS
67042

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Comments

Great glow-in-the-dark tee-shirts. Exclusive only to the Kansas Oil Museum.
What an amazing place with a staff that really cares about their mission. We need more treasures like this museum! I for one plan to do everything I can to help them, especially with their fantastic photographic archive- bringing it to life so that those that are still alive can see and comment on the images for future generations. Without an understanding of history what hope is there for future generations to know what to do in the future? If you don't know where you are going, any path takes you there.