The Art Complex Museum

The Art Complex Museum The museum is a center for the arts and for the collections of the Carl Weyerhaeuser family known for Shaker furniture, prints, American and Asia art. Open Wednesday through Sunday, 1:00 - 4:00 p.m. Entrance to exhibits is always free of charge.
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Thomas Hart Benton, The Little Fisherman, 1967,  lithographThe lithograph by Thomas Hart Benton, Little Fisherman, depic...
07/08/2020

Thomas Hart Benton, The Little Fisherman, 1967, lithograph

The lithograph by Thomas Hart Benton, Little Fisherman, depicts a young boy wearing a straw hat while preparing his bamboo fishing pole to catch fish, an activity that many children enjoy doing with their father’s, especially on Father’s Day. The boy’s elongated, stylized hands and feet are typical features of Benton’s figures.

Thomas Hart Benton was one of the key interpreters of American life from the late 1920s through the mid-twentieth century, having created more than four thousand paintings and lithographs. Benton loved to trek through the back roads of the country and create pencil sketches of rural areas and the people who lived in them. Fishing was a favorite pastime of country life. His compositions celebrate America’s land, history, people and beauty.

While demonstrating Sekino Jun'ichirô’s mastery of composition and skill in printmaking, this print also exhibits the ar...
06/19/2020

While demonstrating Sekino Jun'ichirô’s mastery of composition and skill in printmaking, this print also exhibits the artist’s paternal love and admiration for his family (pets and all).
Sekino Jun'ichirô studied under Onichi Koshiro, one of the great founders of the Sōsaku-hanga, or “creative prints,” movement. Motivated by desires of self-expression, Sōsaku-hanga stressed the artist as the singular creator. This was in contrast to the Shin-hanga, or “new prints,” movement, which revived traditions of Ukiyo-e printmaking and nurtured a fundamentally collaborative philosophy.

🎨: Jun'ichirô Sekino (Japan, 1914-1988), "My Family," 1957, color woodcut on paper

#japaneseprintmaking #sosakuhanga #creativeprints #junichirosekino #japanesewoodblockprint #reliefprint #woodblockprint #blockprinting #artistsfamily #familyportrait #dogsinart #petportrait #catsofinstagram #artcomplexmuseum

Happy Father’s Day, from The Art Complex Museum to dads everywhere! We wish you a day filled with respect, adoration, an...
06/19/2020

Happy Father’s Day, from The Art Complex Museum to dads everywhere! We wish you a day filled with respect, adoration, and relaxation!
This lithograph by Thomas Hart Benton might remind some of us of our fathers and their resolute labors of love. No matter the “dad hobby” to which they dedicate themselves, whether it be woodworking, collecting, running or mechanics, a father’s stoic determination is often unshakable and something to be admired.
“Repairing the Sloop” depicts the artist’s son, T.P., working on his boat in Chilmark, Massachusetts. Following Thomas Hart Benton’s first arrival on Martha’s Vineyard in 1920, he and his wife Rita spent over fifty years summering on the island.
🎨 Thomas Hart Benton (United States, 1889-1975), “Repairing the Sloop,” 1973, lithograph

#happyfathersday #fathersday2020 #thomashartbenton #chilmark #marthasvinyard #sloop #boating #boatlife #boatrepair #printmaking #lithograph #americanregionalism

06/12/2020

The Board of Trustees of The Art Complex Museum have decided to close the museum until June, 2021 or until such later time as the Trustees determine the museum can be reopened safely to the public and in reasonable furtherance of its mission. This was done due to the impact of COVID-19 and concerns about the safety of visitors, volunteers and staff. The uncertain trajectory of the pandemic and the evolving nature of government restrictions on museum operations make it difficult to plan for public operations for the next several months.
In addition, a number of capital projects to enhance the museum’s facilities and grounds had previously been approved. The time will be used to implement a number of projects which will enhance the visitor experience and upgrade the facilities to lay the groundwork for the museum’s next fifty years. Finally, the museum will celebrate its fiftieth anniversary in June, 2021. Plans are that the museum will reopen to the public with an exhibition of its collections.
The Trustees express their gratitude to the members of the museum community, who may be affected by the extended closure, for their patience and understanding. They also express their gratitude to the many volunteers who donate their time and energy and hope that they will return when the museum reopens to celebrate the museum’s fiftieth year. To the visual artists, performing artists, and community organizations who may have had exhibits, performances, or events planned during the coming year, the Trustees appreciate their ongoing partnership and support during these uncertain times and look forward to resuming public activity next year. And finally, the Trustees thank each member of the staff for their flexibility, support, and ongoing commitment to the museum’s mission.

MUSING AROUND AT HOME!Museums around the world are inviting people who are staying at home during quarantine to reinterp...
06/11/2020

MUSING AROUND AT HOME!
Museums around the world are inviting people who are staying at home during quarantine to reinterpret artworks from their collection. Using themselves, their pets and items from the house, people are coming up with clever and amusing photographs and sharing them on social media.

We decided to jump on the bandwagon and have some fun!

Our Education Coordinator, Sally Dean Mello, arranged this still life after the color etching from the museum’s collection.

We have chosen five images from our permanent collection for you to try. Have some fun! We will spotlight a few of them in our museletter. Email your images to [email protected], or post on Instagram- please tag us @theartcomplexmuseum and use the #inspiredbyacm.

This week the Duxbury Public Schools Art Department and The Art Complex Museum collaborated in a drive-by student art sh...
06/09/2020

This week the Duxbury Public Schools Art Department and The Art Complex Museum collaborated in a drive-by student art show installed on the museum grounds. The theme of the show was “Socially Distant” and each student portrait was remarkable. The paintings were well installed for those who wanted to view them while staying in their cars. And, even the parking lot was decorated! Those students who participated were: Kade Breiling, Audrey Ryan, Layla Frederico, Lydia Chesley, Adelyn Hovey, Charlotte White, Molly Bresnehan, Olivia O’Neil, Sydney Ropes, Katedyn Zamboni, Anna O’ Sullivan, Jillian Berry, and Cate Rosenberger.

On June 8th, starting at 2:00 p.m., drive through the parking lot at the museum and see the exhibit "Social Distance" by...
06/03/2020

On June 8th, starting at 2:00 p.m., drive through the parking lot at the museum and see the exhibit "Social Distance" by Duxbury High School art students. The event, “Front Yard Art Show,” is a collaboration between the museum and the Duxbury Public School Art Department, #DPSAoutside

The Art Complex Museum has played an important part in the area’s cultural history for almost fifty years.  Visitors hav...
06/03/2020

The Art Complex Museum has played an important part in the area’s cultural history for almost fifty years. Visitors have been offered events such as exhibit receptions, tea ceremony presentations, concerts, and educational activities.
Now, in the current COVID-19 climate, members of the staff continue to attempt meeting the needs of our community with a newly designed web site, additions to social media such as Face Book and Instagram and such new offerings as a new Museletter, Flashback Fridays and publishing information about highlights from our collection. Please remember that the museum is here for you - all be it virtually, right now. And, we hope that our offerings bring inspiration and enjoyment to you all.
Caption: masks created by Duxbury Middle School students which are the subject of just one of the many articles in the museum’s new Museletter.

Flashback Friday! One more gallery pic from our Wood as Muse exhibition in 2016. Guest curated by the Myth Makers, Andy ...
05/29/2020

Flashback Friday! One more gallery pic from our Wood as Muse exhibition in 2016. Guest curated by the Myth Makers, Andy Moerlein and Donna Dodson. Some Pat Keck, Donna Dodson and Venessa German on the left. #flashbackfriday #patkeck #mythmakers, #donnadodsonartist #artcomplexmuseum #woodasmuse #vanessagerman
Flashback Friday! Looking past some of Pat Keck’s work, to some more of Pat Keck’s work. From our Wood as Muse, exhibition in 2016. Guest Curated by the Myth Makers, Andy Moerlein and Donna Dodson. #flashbackfriday #patkeck #mythmakers #donnadodsonartist, #artcomplexmuseum #woodasmuse #andymoerlein
Flashback Friday! Another gallery shot from our Wood as Muse exhibition in 2016. Guest curated by the Myth Makers, Andy Moerlein and Donna Dodson. These are by Cape artist Breon Dunigan. #flashbackfriday #patkeck #mythmakers #donnadodsonartist #artcomplexmuseum, #woodasmuse #breondunigan #andymoerlein
Flashback Friday! One of Mike Wrights pieces from the Wood as Muse, exhibition in 2016. Guest curated by the Myth Makers, Andy Moerlein and Donna Dodson. Mike works with found materials and the assorted flotsam and jetsum she collects around her Truro home. #flashbackfridays #patkeck #mythmakers #donnadodsonartist #artcomplexmuseum #woodasmuse #breondunigan #mikewright #truro #andymoerlein

Current events have affected just about every aspect of our lives, including our perception of time. We experience time ...
05/26/2020

Current events have affected just about every aspect of our lives, including our perception of time. We experience time subjectively, thus we rely on clocks for an objective measurement. Today, they’re hardly ever out of reach, but they were once a luxury.

In early Shaker communities, watches and clocks were seldom used. Sunrise and sunset were the principal timekeepers and, in order to meet the needs of their industrious and community-focused lifestyle, bells were typically rung to summon community members from sleep, to meals and to meetings. Shaker timepieces, while relatively uncommon, were still produced and the Youngs family of craftsmen were the primary producers of those made at Watervliet, New York. The Dwarf Tall Clock in the museum’s permanent collection is a premier example.

Before joining the sect in 1792, Benjamin Youngs, Sr. (1736-1818) learned his trade from his father, a Connecticut clockmaker. At Watervliet, Benjamin Youngs, Sr. continued his craft and, with the help of a joiner, the clockmaker’s mechanics were housed in cases that incorporated characteristic attributes of Shaker furniture. A reflection of the Shaker’s values, these attributes include simplicity and practicality. This piece features movements by Youngs and, it’s believed, the case may have been made by his nephew, Brother Freegift Wells. Though narrow and stately, the clock is only four feet and six inches tall, hence the “Dwarf Tall Clock” name.

Benjamin Youngs, Sr.

United States (1736-1818)

Dwarf Tall Clock, 1814, Watervliet, New York Shaker Community

Cherry case, pine back, glass, brass works and pendulum

30.29

Sarah Meyers Brent, "Bird Song," 2020, broken toys, studio debris, found objects, and mixed media. One of four women art...
05/22/2020

Sarah Meyers Brent, "Bird Song," 2020, broken toys, studio debris, found objects, and mixed media.
One of four women artists with solo exhibitions in 2021.

This is an excellent opportunity to see the DAA Winter Juried Show with Contemporary Curator Craig Bloodgood as your gui...
05/19/2020
Join our Cloud HD Video Meeting now

This is an excellent opportunity to see the DAA Winter Juried Show with Contemporary Curator Craig Bloodgood as your guide!

Elizabeth Dondero is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.
Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/5681474926?pwd=SjVYaGRQRDhHcUFOZzI4RmJKVkhXZz09
Meeting ID: 568 147 4926
Password: duxbury1

Zoom is the leader in modern enterprise video communications, with an easy, reliable cloud platform for video and audio conferencing, chat, and webinars across mobile, desktop, and room systems. Zoom Rooms is the original software-based conference room solution used around the world in board, confer...

Many of us find comfort in a cup of tea and, in many cases, this sensation may derive, not just from the contents of the...
05/18/2020

Many of us find comfort in a cup of tea and, in many cases, this sensation may derive, not just from the contents of the cup, but from the cup itself.

A vessel’s well-matched functionality and appearance might offer its user a sense of ease and contentment, in turn revealing the object’s inherent beauty. “Yo-no-bi," meaning “beauty through use,” is all about this concept, and it’s a driving notion in Mingei tradition.

The Japanese folk art movement, Mingei, was developed by Yanagi Sōetsu in the late 1920s and 30s. Through close collaboration with Yanagi, potters Hamada Shōji and Kawai Kanjirō deliberately practiced their craft with Mingei in mind.
Now is a better time than ever to appreciate the beauty of use in everyday objects.
Share with us, in which useful objects do you find beauty?

Kawai Kanjirō, Bottle-Shaped Vase, Showa period ca.1961-65, stoneware and three-color glaze.
Hamada Shōji, Tea Bowl, 1971, clay and glaz

A peek at Jackie Reeves’ work space at the Chalkboard Studios in Barnstable. Jackie is one of four women artists with so...
05/15/2020

A peek at Jackie Reeves’ work space at the Chalkboard Studios in Barnstable. Jackie is one of four women artists with solo exhibitions in 2021.

On Flashback Fridays, Craig Bloodgood, Contemporary Curator, provides  behind-the-scene photos of what happens during an...
05/09/2020

On Flashback Fridays, Craig Bloodgood, Contemporary Curator, provides behind-the-scene photos of what happens during an installation.
Captions: One of our more creative installation situations from last year’s "Draw the Line" exhibition. This is Zach Horn installing "Cave," his 8 ½ ‘ by 12 ‘ drawing on canvas. We actually had to heighten the wall for this.
Its hard to believe it’s been almost a year since we installed "Draw the Line" here at the museum. This is step two.
This is step 3.
Gallery photo of last falls "Draw the Line," exhibition. This view shows Zach Horn’s, "Cave,"drawing as well as work by Michele Lauriat on the back wall, John Roman to the left and Leslie Cohen on the right. Rotations Gallery. wall.

The museum is fortunate to have in its permanent collection work relating to our historic region, among which is a portr...
05/01/2020

The museum is fortunate to have in its permanent collection work relating to our historic region, among which is a portrait by American physician and folk painter Rufus Hathaway. 2020 marks the four hundredth anniversary of the founding of Plymouth Colony. In 1629, Colonists, including notable settlers John Alden and Myles Standish, were granted land to the north, along the coast. Later, in 1637, Duxborough was incorporated, becoming the second town in the Commonwealth.
There are certain names that have been known and recognized throughout the long history of Duxbury. They can be seen on street signs and buildings throughout town. Winsor is one of them.
The portrait of Judith Winsor as a young woman was painted by Rufus Hathaway in 1795, a time when Duxbury was rising in prominence as one of the world’s most renowned ship-building towns. In it, the sitter is depicted in the artist’s idiosyncratic style, marked by naively rendered forms and emphasized elements of pattern and design. Hathaway may have worked as an apprentice ship-carver but was presumably self-taught as an artist, traveling through southern Massachusetts creating portraits. It is thought that the sitter and artist fell in love while this portrait was being made!
After their marriage, Hathaway took up medicine, studying under Dr. Isaac Winslow of Marshfield. He spent the rest of his life in Duxbury, serving as the town’s only physician.

Caption: Rufus Hathaway, American, 1770–1822, “Judith Winsor,” 1795, oil on canvas

After her husband Rufus died in 1822, Judith Winsor Hathaway, at the age of forty-four, was left responsible for their nine children. Her modest circumstances forced her to board ship’s carpenters in her home on Washington Street which has since been destroyed. She was admired for her courage and resilient efforts to keep her children together.
That courage can be seen in a daughter of Judith Winsor Hathaway and Rufus Hathaway, Judith Winsor Smith. She went on to become an American women's suffrage activist, social reformer, and abolitionist.

Caption: Judith Winsor at age 102, 1880, photographed by M. Chandler, Marshfield Massachusetts

The museum is fortunate to have in its permanent collection work relating to our historic region, among which is a portr...
05/01/2020

The museum is fortunate to have in its permanent collection work relating to our historic region, among which is a portrait by American physician and folk painter Rufus Hathaway. 2020 marks the four hundredth anniversary of the founding of Plymouth Colony. In 1629, Colonists, including notable settlers John Alden and Myles Standish, were granted land to the north, along the coast. Later, in 1637, Duxborough was incorporated, becoming the second town in the Commonwealth.
There are certain names that have been known and recognized throughout the long history of Duxbury. They can be seen on street signs and buildings throughout town. Winsor is one of them.
The portrait of Judith Winsor as a young woman was painted by Rufus Hathaway in 1795, a time when Duxbury was rising in prominence as one of the world’s most renowned ship-building towns. In it, the sitter is depicted in the artist’s idiosyncratic style, marked by naively rendered forms and emphasized elements of pattern and design. Hathaway may have worked as an apprentice ship-carver but was presumably self-taught as an artist, traveling through southern Massachusetts creating portraits. It is thought that the sitter and artist fell in love while this portrait was being made!
After their marriage, Hathaway took up medicine, studying under Dr. Isaac Winslow of Marshfield. He spent the rest of his life in Duxbury, serving as the town’s only physician.

Caption: Rufus Hathaway, American, 1770–1822, “Judith Winsor,” 1795, oil on canvas

After her husband Rufus died in 1822, Judith Winsor Hathaway, at the age of forty-four, was left responsible for their nine children. Her modest circumstances forced her to board ship’s carpenters in her home on Washington Street which has since been destroyed. She was admired for her courage and resilient efforts to keep her children together.
That courage can be seen in a daughter of Judith Winsor Hathaway and Rufus Hathaway, Judith Winsor Smith. She went on to become an American women's suffrage activist, social reformer, and abolitionist.

Caption: Judith Winsor at age 102, 1880, photographed by M. Chandler, Marshfield Massachusetts

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PO Box 2814 189 Alden St
Duxbury, MA
02332

Opening Hours

Wednesday 13:00 - 16:00
Thursday 13:00 - 16:00
Friday 13:00 - 16:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

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(781) 934-6634

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The Art Complex Museum takes the health and safety of our staff, volunteers, and visitors seriously. In response to the growing concern around the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) we are closely monitoring the recommendations of the Massachusetts Department of Public Health and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We have decided to postpone the upcoming events and classes: March 18 Yoga with Kezia Bacon Oil Painting with Laura Tryon Jennings March 19 Gallery Talk, Meet the Artists from the DAA Winter Juried Show Watercolor Painting with Jack Haran March 22 Artist Demonstration with Stephanie Roberts-Camello & Emily Gibson We will remain open to the public during our regular museum hours, Wednesday-Sunday, 1-4 pm. We are carefully tracking the coronavirus situation, and will notify you should we decide to take additional precautions.
Lovely Laura! Sally
Hello Art Complex Museum ,,,FYI...! Come join our 180 year old Pairpoint Glass Company in Sagamore by celebrating the opening of our new glass making school. We will now be offering glassblowing and flame working classes within our remodeled facility. LAUNCH PARTY SAT Nov 10th. 6-9pm "Create Something Great @ Pairpoint" https://www.facebook.com/events/2202146063190174/?active_tab=about
Do you still have yoga on Wednesdays there?
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