Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct

Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct is a private, non profit volunteer organization formed to protect and preserve the Old Croton Aqueduct and Trail that runs from Manhattan up to Croton, NY.
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Operating as usual

Thursday, September 10th at 10:00amSleepy Hollow Loop Walk along the Aqueduct and within the Rockefeller PreserveFree, s...
08/28/2020

Thursday, September 10th at 10:00am

Sleepy Hollow Loop Walk along the Aqueduct and within the Rockefeller Preserve

Free, small group, open-air 5-mile walk.

Required: pre-registration (limited number); masks, and social distancing.

We will walk north and discuss the Aqueduct and view some of its structures, including a weir, a 90-foot high embankment carrying the Aqueduct over the Pocantico River, the ghostly remnants of an old Keeper’s House, and touch upon Rockefeller history and the monument in nearby Sleepy Hollow Cemetery to those in the NY Guard’s First Provisional Regiment who perished during the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic while guarding the Aqueduct during The Great War.

New Walk!  Croton Reservoir & Dam Hike Friday, September 4 - 10:00amFree, small group, open-air 2-mile (total) hike nort...
08/28/2020

New Walk! Croton Reservoir & Dam Hike

Friday, September 4 - 10:00am

Free, small group, open-air 2-mile (total) hike north along the Aqueduct and atop the beautiful Croton Dam.

Required: pre-registration (limited number); masks, and social distancing. Walk will be rescheduled if weather does not cooperate. Co-led by Tom Tarnowsky.

A three in one win: Adopting a part of the Aqueduct Trail, a meadow of native pollinator plants and fewer Invasives.Than...
08/06/2020

A three in one win: Adopting a part of the Aqueduct Trail, a meadow of native pollinator plants and fewer Invasives.

Thank you Daria!
https://aqueduct.org/news/adopting-part-trail

(Photos by Daria Gregg/Videos by Daria Gregg and Diane Alden)

New!  Wed July 22 - 10:00amZoom Meeting Tour of the Audubon Mural Project, with Leigh Hallingbyhttps://aqueduct.org/even...
07/17/2020
Zoom Meeting Tour of the Audubon Mural Project, with Leigh Hallingby

New! Wed July 22 - 10:00am

Zoom Meeting Tour of the Audubon Mural Project, with Leigh Hallingby

https://aqueduct.org/events/zoom-meeting-tour-audubon-mural-project-leigh-hallingby

This event is free and open to the public. Registration required

Please join us for this stimulating and engaging online program. The Audubon Mural Project Virtual Tour is one hour, with time for questions and answers at the end. We will see about 40 murals - significantly more than can be seen on an actual walking tour.

The Audubon Bird Mural Project is an impressive effort to create, in NYC, murals of over 300 North American birds. Most of the murals are in the Harlem neighborhoods of Hamilton Heights and Washington Heights, where John James Audubon lived the last ten years of his life. Since all of the birds painted are threatened by climate change, the Project is designed not only to display the birds’ beauty, but also to make us aware of the challenges that they face...

This event is free and open to the public. Please join us for this stimulating and engaging online program. The Audubon Mural Project Virtual Tour is one hour, with time for questions and answers at the end. We will see about 40 murals - significantly more than can be seen on an actual walking tour....

New Walk! Tuesday, July 21 - 10:00amhttps://aqueduct.org/events/sleepy-hollow-loop-walk-along-aqueduct-and-within-rockef...
07/14/2020

New Walk! Tuesday, July 21 - 10:00am

https://aqueduct.org/events/sleepy-hollow-loop-walk-along-aqueduct-and-within-rockefeller-preserve

"Sleepy Hollow Loop Walk along the Aqueduct and within the Rockefeller Preserve".

We will walk north and discuss the Aqueduct and view some of its structures, including including a weir, a 90-foot high embankment carrying the Aqueduct over the Pocantico River, the ghostly remnants of an old Keeper’s House, and touch upon Rockefeller history and the monument in nearby Sleepy Hollow Cemetery to those in the NY Guard’s First Provisional Regiment who perished during the 1918 Spanish Influenza pandemic while guarding the Aqueduct during The Great War.

Free, small group, open-air walk. Pre-registration (limited number); masks, and social distancing.

Sleepy Hollow Closure and DetourSleepy Hollow High School is a massive construction site. According to the construction ...
07/02/2020

Sleepy Hollow Closure and Detour

Sleepy Hollow High School is a massive construction site. According to the construction signs, the construction will not end until August 31st.

Please scroll down on the web page to download a printable version of the Detour Map!

https://aqueduct.org/news/sleepy-hollow-closure

New on the  Friends Website: "Openings and Closings Along the Trail"As always, the 41 miles of the Old Croton Aqueduct T...
07/02/2020

New on the Friends Website: "Openings and Closings Along the Trail"

As always, the 41 miles of the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail is open to the public! In order to help visitors understand current openings and restrictions the Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct have put together a list of information for parks and sites along the Aqueduct Trail.

https://aqueduct.org/openings-and-closings-along-trail

Covid-19 Update: NYS Parks now advises that we may begin a cautious resumption of safely controlled walks and tours. We ...
07/02/2020

Covid-19 Update: NYS Parks now advises that we may begin a cautious resumption of safely controlled walks and tours. We will begin to offer open-air walks and tours involving small groups, with masks and proper social distancing required. Participation will be by reservation only. Notices of any such walks and tours will appear on our website, Facebook, Instagram and in our eBlasts.
The Keepers House is still closed until further notice. Maps of the Westchester and New York City portions of the trail are available for purchase at https://aqueduct.org/store/maps. Retail locations also are listed at https://aqueduct.org/maps/retail. Of course, the Aqueduct trail is still available for personal use and enjoyment, consistent with whatever the current health advisories are at the time. We are especially lucky to have the trail readily at foot during this time.

aqueduct.org

More Treasures of the OCA!These colorful hand painted stones were found at the base of the ventilator at Pinecrest in Ha...
06/22/2020

More Treasures of the OCA!

These colorful hand painted stones were found at the base of the ventilator at Pinecrest in Hastings on Hudson. Many thanks to the wonderful community members who created these cheerful treasures.

06/10/2020
What is this world if full of careWe have no time to stand and stare"- W H DaviesSo many walkers have called or written ...
05/28/2020

What is this world if full of care
We have no time to stand and stare"
- W H Davies

So many walkers have called or written to say how much they treasure the trail especially through this difficult time. Please take the time to look around you as you walk. A visual treasure is there!

https://aqueduct.org/news/treasures-oca

Please share your own treasures at #treasuresoftheoca

The Keeper's House is patiently awaiting the time when we can all enjoy our wonderful visitors again!
05/07/2020

The Keeper's House is patiently awaiting the time when we can all enjoy our wonderful visitors again!

For those of you who have not had a chance to experience our exhibit at the Keeper's House, we now have an virtual versi...
05/07/2020

For those of you who have not had a chance to experience our exhibit at the Keeper's House, we now have an virtual version for you to enjoy!

How New York Became the Empire City: ONLINE EXHIBIT

https://aqueduct.org/how-ny-became-empire-city

It is a beautiful day!  If you are on the OCA Trail, please don't forget your masks.  Enjoy!....and please help us keep ...
05/02/2020

It is a beautiful day! If you are on the OCA Trail, please don't forget your masks.

Enjoy!.

...and please help us keep the Trail Open.

From our Blogs: "A 41 Miler Reports""Over several days during the holiday week of 2019-2020, I was inspired to achieve a...
05/02/2020

From our Blogs: "A 41 Miler Reports"

"Over several days during the holiday week of 2019-2020, I was inspired to achieve a goal that I have often thought about: walking the entire 41 mile length of the Old Croton Aqueduct historic trail..."

https://aqueduct.org/news/41-miler-reports

If you have walked (or run!) the 26 Miles of the OCA Trail in Westchester or the entire 41 Miles of the Trail, including Manhattan please let us know so you can get your patch!

https://aqueduct.org/26-and-41-mile-walkerrunner-recognition

Many us are increasingly turning to the outdoors and nature for exercise, comfort, and a breath of fresh air on the Old ...
04/30/2020

Many us are increasingly turning to the outdoors and nature for exercise, comfort, and a breath of fresh air on the Old Croton Aqueduct Trail. Please remember the words from the Appalachian Trail. “Pack in and pack out” and please take your trash with you. It is important to all of us to keep one of our most precious resources safe and clean during this time. Enjoy the Trail!

aqueduct.org

04/23/2020
Just emerged Black Swallowtail Butterfly

This is a Black Swallowtail butterfly I raised last season, drying its wings as it emerges from its chrysalis. I am posting this in celebration of Earth Day Lower Hudson PRISM I celebrate the earth in all of its aspects, for we are one with all of its wonderful creatures; I cherish the opportunity to be out in nature and to encounter what I consider to be my friends and family. I also want to give tribute to all of the mentors who have taught me over the years how to truly see what I am observing. Thoreau said: It’s not what you look at, it’s how you look and whether you see. Doug Tallamy said “In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we only understand what we are taught.” My mentor Gary Lincoff taught me how to see the features of fungi; now I will not go into the woods without a loupe to see the small details. Taro Ietaka taught me how to look at lichens and mosses and now I can identify a few of them; he also recommended what has become my favorite book, Gathering Moss by Robin Wall Kimmerer. Carol Levine taught me how to observe twigs to identify trees, who knew? Terminal buds, bud scale scars, phyllotaxy, the manner in which the leaves are arranged on branches and so much more including How to Identify Wildflowers in Winter. Carol Gracie taught me how to look at the details of flower structure in person and with her special field guide and other books. Bill Yule taught me to understand how the fungi nourish the trees and plants and help them communicate with each other. Jim Miller taught me how to look at caterpillars and moths. Linda Rohleder taught me how to identify many invasive plants. And so many more. Studying and sharpening my observational skills enhances and gives meaning to my life. This is what then motivates me to be a nature activist, planting native plants, removing invasive ones and teaching and motivating others. Diane Alden

04/18/2020

Address

15 Walnut St
Dobbs Ferry, NY
10522

You can access the aqueduct trail from Metro-North railroad, Hudson line to Hastings-on-Hudson, Dobbs Ferry, Irvington, or Tarrytown.

Telephone

+9146934117

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Comments

Today, walking the trail between Irvington and Lyndhurst, I found a small brass(?) plate. If you believe it is yours, please describe. Of course, I will return the plate upon receiving a matching description. The plate does not appear to be antique or of much value, but I expect it would be a nuisance to replace.
I just realized I am working on( fiber art piece that has) Ventilator shaft # 8 ( on the Aqueduct trail)
Chat Conversation Start 1.7K people like this Park 11:21 AM What can we do about the littering on the OCA trails? Now that more people are home and with many discovering the trails I have seen more trash on the trails then usual. The ventilator #19 is located behind my backyard and people leave trash near and on it daily. The Untermeyer park is about a 5min walk from me and they have a trash can behind the welcome sign easy to reach from the gate even if the doors are locked. Last year one home south of mine off the trail fence caught on fire due to a cigarette.😔😥
Thank YOU to Sara and Pete, from the Guides Association Of New York City Our visit to the New Dam and the 1842 Tunnel was part of a great day. You are both top notch guides. All the way home and on social media, the members are still taking about our day. It was wonderful, educational and a pleasure to visit
A Thank you to Pete and Sara, at Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct That is from the Guides Association Of New York City. We enjoyed our visit, with 37 enthusiastic members. We visited the Ossining Weir and the Croton Dam. Pete and Sara were great!
With 60+ degree weather in NYC this weekend, my brother, his girls and I made a wonderful decision to visit the Old Croton Aqueduct Historic State Park in Dobbs Ferry, NY on Saturday. It's a main access point to an easy 26-mile scenic walking/hiking/biking trail atop the Old Croton Aqueduct. We parked and started at the 1857-built Keeper's House which is free, open to the public, where Mavis Cain, President of Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct taught us much about the history of the Old Croton Aqueduct, which went off-line and stopped supplying water to NYC in 1955. Constructed from 1837 to 1842 to supply Manhattan with fresh water, the Old Croton Aqueduct lies buried in a man-made sloping dirt berm. So, the trail runs right on top of the berm and therefore, the old aqueduct. The scenic trail runs atop the northernmost 26-miles, although the aqueduct itself is 41 miles long, and carried water by gravity from the source (Croton River) to Manhattan. The height of the gravity-fed aqueduct drops 1/4" per 100' (13 inches per mile), taking 22 hours for gravity to move the water down the 41 miles at a speed of 1.86 miles per hour to reach Manhattan. It was built because local water sources for Manhattan had become polluted and inadequate for the growing population – which was just 319,000 people living in Manhattan at the time (1842). There was no plumbing for fresh water, no wastewater or sewer systems. Wealthy people had water delivered to them by the Manhattan Company, a water company which eventually became Chase Manhattan bank. Much of the above info is from Wikipedia. We walked the trail about 3 miles. Many empty bird nests and squirrels in the trees along the way. A good day was had by all. We hope to return again once spring has sprung!
We loved the nature, history & unique facts about Ossining & stories about the aqueduct past & present that was exceptionally led by Friends of the Old Croton Aqueduct Star ⭐️ tour guide Leslie! It was called Weirs to Beers 🍻 & ended with Sing Sing Kills brewery stop in Ossining! We will definitely go again. I couldn’t believe how three hours in Ossining could be so great & free activity!
Does anyone have a gpx file or map of the section of the rtoue in NYC? Trying to plan a run of the whole 41 miles.
Never know what you’ll see on the trail!
Does Your Library Have a Library Telescope program? A Library Telescope is a telescope owned by a library that can be borrowed just like a book. Usually it’s a modified Orion 4.5” StarBlast Reflector Telescope. Shouldn’t your library have one? What better way to bring astronomy to the youth of today, than to give them access to a telescope? Having a parent, or other adult, borrow the telescope and amaze a child with views of the Moon or a planet, could make a lasting impression. Maybe even lead to a career in astronomy or some other science. Hundreds of libraries across the US have Library Telescope programs that have been remarkably successful. A library can get a telescope program going for under $400. Does your library have a Library Telescope? NO? You should get that fixed. See page: Library Telescopes for more information.
A tale about the trail.