Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society

Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society Preserving, protecting, and promoting the historic, architectural, cultural, and aesthetic attributed of the Park Cities since 1982.
The roots of Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society (PCHPS) reach back to 1982 with the creation of Park Cities Historical Society to preserve, protect and promote the historic, cultural and aesthetic attributes and traditions of the Park Cities. The Society originally was active in four distinct areas of historical interest: * an extensive photographic survey of Park Cities residences * a landmark designation program for buildings and sites * an educational program about the history and heritage of the Park Cities * saving one of the Park Cities' oldest homes by moving it to Old City Park Founded in 2000, Preservation Park Cities worked to preserve the character and legacy of our community, encompassing the preservation of our trees, parks, and pedestrian-friendly streets. This organization also instituted a recognition program for preservation-minded homeowners, an annual Historic Home Tour attended by over 1,000 people each year, and a survey of a portion of the Hackberry Creek neighborhood for possible Texas Historic Preservation designation. In 2006 the Historical Society and Preservation Park Cities recognized that they were working for similar purposes and merged. Together the organizations have recognized over 165 homes and building sites, through rigorous evaluation, with bronze plaques posted on each site. The current community-led Society is an active, cohesive organization that continues to protect and promote the historic, architectural, cultural and aesthetic legacy of the Park Cities.
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HIGHLAND PARK | 4300 ARMSTRONG PARKWAY Italian Renaissance styleThe Dallas Morning News - 04 26 2020By MARY GRACE METHEN...
04/26/2020

HIGHLAND PARK | 4300 ARMSTRONG PARKWAY Italian Renaissance style
The Dallas Morning News - 04 26 2020
By MARY GRACE METHENY Staff Writer
[email protected]
This is the first time since 1939 that this Highland Park property at 4300 Armstrong Parkway has been on the market. Edwin Cox, Dallas businessman and primary benefactor of Southern Methodist University’s Cox School of Business, bought the property to build a family home.

Current owners Jeanne and Berry Cox bought the property from his grandparents and planned to remodel and redesign the original home. But when they tried to design the remodel, they found it didn’t suit their needs and decided to build the existing home in its place.

Listing agent Penny Cook said that she thinks the property is a rare find, first because it sits on such a large lot in Highland Park but also because it has been in one family for 81 years.

The 11,702-square-foot home sits on 1.6 acres with four large bedrooms, four bathrooms and three half-bathrooms. Designed by Richard Drummond Davis, the sprawling house has an Italian Renaissance style with vines covering the exterior of the home and stylized details on the interior.

A winding staircase and large windows make a grand entrance that leads into a formal living area and a nearby dining area. The dining room walls are covered with a canvas wallpaper that was hand-painted with a scene of the home from the exterior.

All of the rooms on the back side of the house — both the living and family rooms — open to expansive outdoor seating areas. Outside, there’s a large pool. The kitchen, a library, a guest bedroom and a game room are also on the first floor.
The master suite is on the second floor with a large bathroom and two walk-in closets. The master suite includes its own separate living space, an office and a coffee bar.

Two more bedrooms with en suite bathrooms and walk-in closets and an exercise room are also upstairs. Cook said the design is versatile and provides many ways for the next owners to reinvent the space.

“It’s a classic design that someone else, if they wanted to change it a little bit, they could make it more of a Santa Barbara feel,” Cook said. “But it’s truly a timeless design. I anticipate that, because of the quality, it will be a timeless home forever.”

Read our AXIS Magazine with many informative historical articles about the Park Cities. Download a copy to keep! Thank y...
04/15/2020

Read our AXIS Magazine with many informative historical articles about the Park Cities. Download a copy to keep! Thank you to our many sponsors who made this magazine possible!

http://pchps.org/resources/Documents/AXIS%202020.pdf

This is one of the magnificent homes you would have seen on the home tour! Stay tuned - it will be on the tour next year...
04/14/2020

This is one of the magnificent homes you would have seen on the home tour! Stay tuned - it will be on the tour next year ! 3400 Drexel - Homeowners: Jason and Leonore Owsley

Built by Walter William Whitley, a prominent local builder, in 1924. Shortly after completion, the home was occupied by Robert Chalmers, who arrived from Scotland to become the dean of St. Matthews Episcopal Cathedral. The symmetrical front façade with accented doorway and evenly spaced windows has characteristics of Colonial Revival architecture, which was popular from 1885-1955. The home was in disrepair when the current owners bought it. They honored the original footprint of the home and renovated the spirit of the home.

We mourn the loss of PCHPS member Virginia Savage McAlester. Please keep her family in your thoughts and prayers during ...
04/11/2020

We mourn the loss of PCHPS member Virginia Savage McAlester. Please keep her family in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time.

From: Amy Talkington
Virginia Savage McAlester May 13, 1943 - April 9, 2020
I’m heartbroken to share the news that my mother passed away.
Like her maiden name Virginia Savage, mom was a study in contrasts – an oxymoron. She was fierce, yet gentle. Brilliant, yet spacey. Wildly accomplished, yet so unpretentious you may not have known that. She was the toughest person I have known, and yet a sweet southern lady. She was not terribly “maternal”, yet she was the most wonderful mother I know of.

My mother’s lifelong passion was to preserve historic houses and buildings in her hometown of Dallas. She came up with an inventive way to restore neighborhoods – she got a bank loan and created a “revolving fund” to restore and sell homes, not for profit but for the benefit of her community – a model that was replicated throughout the country. She was also an activist who’s been known to park her car in front of bulldozers to keep them from tearing down historic buildings. I remember a local newscaster on the scene saying “It’s ‘COPS’ meets ‘This Old House’!!” She once brought me and my brother, as young children, parking us in front of an imperiled old house, daring the bulldozer to do it. Yes, it was terrifying but it got the job done. For these acts and many, many more she won great recognition including an honorary PhD from S.M.U. and “The Keys to the City” awarded by Mayor Rawlings.

When mom was trying to designate her neighborhood as Dallas’ first historic district, the application required her to name the “style” of each home. But she found that there was no guide to help her identify the house styles. So… she decided to write that guide herself. The result was “A Field Guide to American Houses,” published in 1984 and revised in 2013. It was the country’s first, and most definitive, guide to typical American architecture, an evergreen, "crown jewel" at her publishing house Knopf.

Mom and I hit our mother-daughter stride, of all things, filling out applications for boarding schools. First, though, she would have it known she did NOT ship me off to boarding school – she didn’t want me to go but contended that I was “sufficiently difficult” that she finally relented to my begging. But once she decided to help me apply, she went full tilt (as she did everything). She photographed all of my artwork and helped me create a portfolio. Taking such time and care, she helped me recognize that my body of work was worthy. We put together portfolios again as I applied to college, then to transfer college... and then for graduate school. Reflecting with her recently, we both remembered these as some of our most special times. I told her maybe that was why I went to so many schools – so I could do more applications with her.

Mom cheated death several times in her life. She lived through polio as a child, aggressive cancer as a young mother and, more recently, myelofibriosis (a rare blood cancer) for which she underwent a stem cell transplant in 2013, determined to finish her Field Guide revisions (and have more years with her grandchildren). She fought the disease like a warrior and never once complained but, now, almost seven years later, her body succumbed to the complications. I will miss her dearly every single day.

If you knew mom, please join our Virginia Savage McAlester (May 13, 1943 - April 9, 2020) Memorial Group & share memories and thoughts.

3318 Beverly is a treasure of the neighborhood. You may see it when you are out taking a walk.
04/09/2020

3318 Beverly is a treasure of the neighborhood. You may see it when you are out taking a walk.

Your support of the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society is vital to preserving community awareness regarding t...
04/08/2020

Your support of the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society is vital to preserving community awareness regarding the importance of protecting and promoting visual history along with architectural and cultural legacies of the Park Cities. Please consider joining or renewing your membership today. www.pchps.org

PCHPS membership benefits and activities for 2019-2020 year are listed below:

-Three educational meetings during the year
Landmarking events honoring significant homes for architectural, historical or restoration merit
-Holiday Party in a historically significant home
PCHPS annual spring Home Tour
-Distinguished Speaker Luncheon
-Fifth Annual Classic & Antique Car Show
-July 4th Parade and booth

The fundraising events that allow PCHPS to give back to the community are the Distinguished Speaker Luncheon, Home Tour, and the Classic & Antique Car Show. Funds raised help preserve and maintain:

The Park Cities House at Dallas Heritage Village
Support the new PCHPS archives at the University Park Library, Fund the Society’s landmarking initiatives, Award scholarships to Highland Park High School graduating seniors planning to study architecture or history, Fund the Distinguished Chair for History at Highland Park High School.

The Home Tour, Speaker Luncheon and Car Show will all be rescheduled for the Fall. We will keep you posted when the date...
04/01/2020

The Home Tour, Speaker Luncheon and Car Show will all be rescheduled for the Fall. We will keep you posted when the dates are confirmed. Wonderful story in Estate Life Magazine about the homes and the owners of homes that will be featured on the Home Tour.

HOME TOUR WILL BE RESCHEDULED - This is one in series about the homes that were to be featured on our home tour. The tou...
03/20/2020

HOME TOUR WILL BE RESCHEDULED - This is one in series about the homes that were to be featured on our home tour. The tour and other events are being rescheduled and will let you know dates as soon as they can be confirmed.

4412 Lakeside - Homeowners: Jeffrey and April Manson

Preeminent architect, Hal Thomson, built this grand dame of eclectic Italian Renaissance architecture in 1918. Deep bracketed eaves, Roman arch windows, a gracious front terrace with balustrade and the unique decorative medallions combine in a distinctive manner. The owners undertook major cosmetic updates in 2018 to restore the interior Venetian plaster, fireplaces, gates, and pool. This family elected to live with prior renovations to this three-story, 103 year-old residence. Bold color, modern art, antiques, elegant fabrics, and other surprising interior design elements make this home feel exciting and intriguing. This classic Hal Thomson residence is a century old exquisite envelope that once opened reveals a modern world inside.

HOME TOUR WILL BE RESCHEDULED - This is one in  series about the homes that were to be featured on our home tour. The to...
03/19/2020

HOME TOUR WILL BE RESCHEDULED - This is one in series about the homes that were to be featured on our home tour. The tour is being rescheduled and will let you know dates as soon as they can be confirmed.

7000 Vassar - Homeowners: James and Betsy Sowell

Surrounded by magnificent towering oak trees, this residence in Volk Estates is situated on approximately two acres. In 1890 the Volk family started their department stores and by 1927 owned a 77-acre area called Brookside, now known as Volk Estates. Architect Gayden Thompson and builder C.B. Christensen completed this eclectic Neoclassical style home in 1940 for Mr. & Mrs. Harold Volk, and The Dallas Morning News selected it as Dallas’ Best Modern House in 1940. The full-height entry porch and four impressive Roman Tuscan columns with Doric capitals define the front elevation as classical, but the interior has countless contemporary touches.

Homes Slated for Demolition: 2824 Purdue St, 3538 Caruth Blvd, 3545 Southwestern Blvd, 3605 Bryn Mawr Dr, 3629 Bryn Mawr...
03/18/2020

Homes Slated for Demolition: 2824 Purdue St, 3538 Caruth Blvd, 3545 Southwestern Blvd, 3605 Bryn Mawr Dr, 3629 Bryn Mawr Dr, 3637 Greenbrier Dr, 3817 Stanford Ave, 4217 Hanover St, 4300 Lorraine, 4304 Lorraine, 4309 Stanford Ave, 4333 Emerson Ave, 4350 Rheims

While our Society seeks to preserve this heritage, we should also make every effort to encourage new architecture that is of equal or better quality than the older homes they replace. In most places where preservation flourishes, it is because it increases the value of property in a declining neighborhood. In the Park Cities, we have increasingly higher land values that make the economics of preservation more difficult to justify. The challenge is to preserve the best and encourage the highest quality new development.There are many advantages that we enjoy as residents of the Park Cities: responsive police and fire protection, excellent schools, vibrant churches and beautiful parks that provide venues for Y sports programs. But we sometimes overlook the neighborhoods in which we live. Because our homes have been built over a period of almost 100 years, we have a diversity of styles that are representative of what was fashionable during various eras. This provides a rich mosaic of homes that reflect the tastes of the individual owners as well as their architects. Few neighborhoods are developed in this way today, nor do they have the heritage that only time can give.

PCHPS schedule in light of COVID-19 health concernsDue to the recent events related to the Coronavirus, Park Cities Hist...
03/16/2020

PCHPS schedule in light of COVID-19 health concerns

Due to the recent events related to the Coronavirus, Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society will SUSPEND the planned events for April which include the Distinguished Speaker Luncheon, Home Tour, and Classic & Antique Car Show.

More to come when these events are re-scheduled!

We value our members safety and well-being and would like to encourage you to take the appropriate measures to stay healthy. In this time of uncertainty, it is best to rely on information from reliable sources. Please reference these organizations for information:

-Dallas County Health and Human Services
-Texas Department of State Health Services
-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
-World Health Organization

Thank you so much for your support of our events. We will keep you informed on any developments.

More to come when these events are re-scheduled!

Stay safe!

Marla Boone
President

The Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society (PCHPS) landmarked five significant homes recently: 4229 Arcady, home ...
03/10/2020

The Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society (PCHPS) landmarked five significant homes recently: 4229 Arcady, home of Susan and James Gibbs; 3913 Miramar Avenue, home of Nancy Shelton; 3400 Drexel Drive, home of Leonore and Jason Owsley – which is on the PCHPS Historic Home Tour on Saturday, April 18, 2020; 3220 Daniel, Wesley House, Sarah and Rev. Andrew Beard, Highland Park United Methodist Church; 3404 Southwestern Blvd., home of Mardi and Allen Myers.
PCHPS members and friends joined Marla Boone, PCHPS president, Jane Fitch, PCHPS Historic Home Tour chair and Taylor Armstrong, advisory board member. As the ceremonies began at the Gibbs’ home, Taylor welcomed the crowd saying, “The Park Cities is blessed with an abundance of architectural and historically significant houses and our Society strives to preserve them for future generations to enjoy and appreciate.” As everyone visited each home, they
enjoyed conversations with the homeowners and some inside peeks at the renovations and interior design.
Also joining the crowd were Landmark Advisory board members and co-chairs Paul Willey and Cele Johnsen and other members of the board, including Bruce Harbour and Mike Sanders. Moving from home to home made for an educational and entertaining morning of fellowship topping it all off with a delicious buffet hosted by the Myers, along with a personal tour of their home.
In addition to the Historic Home Tour, PCHPS spring events include the Distinguished Speaker Luncheon and the Classic & antique Car Show.
Highland Park Village is the Preservation Sponsor for the events. “As one of our city’s historic landmarks, Highland Park Village is pleased to support the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society and all they continue to do in our community,” says Ray Washburne, managing director of Highland Park Village.
The Distinguished Speaker Luncheon, chaired by Meg Jones Boyd and Sally Jones, happens on Wednesday, April 15, 2020 at the Brook Hollow Golf Club. Featured speakers are Christine Allison, CEO, D Home and Gillea Allison, President, D HOME, Presenting Magazine Sponsor. Tickets for the luncheon start at $150 each and will be available in 2020. Patron single seating starts at $300 each and include a Patron Party invitation. Other levels include more benefits. Sponsorships and table underwriting are available beginning at $1,500 up to $10,000.
Homes on the Historic Home Tour are: 3400 Drexel, 3429 Drexel, 4412 Lakeside and 7000 Vassar. The purpose of the annual Historic Home Tour is to showcase architecturally and historically significant homes of the Park Cities and illustrate how these homes have been restored or remodeled and updated to serve the lifestyle needs of families today. The Society landmarks architecturally and historically significant homes in the Park Cities, some of which are on the Historic Home Tour. Tom Thumb is the Ticket Sponsor. Tickets are $20 each purchased in advance and $25 when purchased at the door. Checks, cash and charge cards will be accepted. Advance tickets will be available online at www.pchps.org All tickets purchased online will be mailed. They will also available at these Tom Thumb stores beginning March 15, 2020: Snider Plaza, Preston Center, Greenville/Lovers Lane, Inwood/University, Lincoln Center.
The Classic & Antique Car Show will be on Saturday, April 25, 2020 at Burleson Park, 3000 University Boulevard, and is chaired by Polly and Dan McKeithen. This event is free and open to the public, so drop by and enjoy visiting with the vehicle owners and auto enthusiasts. There are show vehicles in multiple classes and trophies will be awarded in different categories TBD. Day-of event registration for car owners begins at 8:30 a.m. Fee is $25 in advance and $35 at the door. Registration will also be available online in early 2020. For more information, email [email protected]
Membership in the Park Cities Historic and Preservation Society is open to the public. Community support is vital to preserving community awareness regarding the importance of protecting and promoting visual history along with architectural and cultural legacies of the Park Cities.
PCHPS membership benefits and activities for 2019-2020 year include:
Three educational meetings during the year, landmarking events honoring significant homes for architectural, historical or restoration merit, Holiday Party in a historically significant home, PCHPS annual spring Home Tour, Distinguished Speaker Luncheon, Fifth Annual Classic & Antique Car Show, July 4th Parade and booth.
The fundraising events that allow PCHPS to give back to the community are the Distinguished Speaker Luncheon, Home Tour, and the Classic & Antique Car Show. Funds raised help preserve and maintain The Park Cities House at Dallas Heritage Village, support the new PCHPS archives at the University Park Library, fund the Society’s landmarking initiatives, award scholarships to Highland Park High School graduating seniors planning to study architecture or history and fund the Distinguished Chair for History at Highland Park High School.
Visit the website to join and for more information at www.pchps.org

Address

25 Highland Park Vlg, # 286, Ste 100
Dallas, TX
75205

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(214) 528-0021

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Urgent request for your help: Proposed House Bill that Would Curtail Power to Landmark Historic Properties Going to a Vote Your help is needed! Our friends at Preservation Austin have alerted us that HB 2496 has been scheduled for a vote by the House next Wednesday. This is the bill that a previous alert was sent out for due to how it would negatively impact the process for designating historic properties at the local level. We need your help again, even if you sent something before. Please see below for details on the bill and how to oppose it before the hearing. We need you to oppose HB 2496, the bill co-sponsored by Rep. John Cyrier and Rep. Sheryl Cole that would fundamentally weaken our ability to save important historic places across the state. It will be up for vote on the House floor this coming Wednesday, April 24. As currently written, the bill will require that all municipalities in Texas get the vote of 3/4 of their landmark or planning commissions to recommend historic zoning over owner objection. Additionally, companion bill SB 1488 - introduced by Sen. Dawn Buckingham - which would ban all historic zoning without owner consent, is still pending in the Senate's Natural Resources & Economic Development Committee. HB 2496 and SB 1488 seek to fix a problem that does not exist, and to change standard preservation and zoning laws that have been upheld by courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, for decades. These bills would have a disastrous effect on preservation efforts across the state, and here's why: 1. Requiring a "super-majority" vote of a landmark or planning commission sets a higher bar for historic zoning than for any other zoning category. Landmark and planning commissions do not make final decisions on zoning changes, they simply make recommendations to their city councils. State law already requires city councils to have a 3/4 majority vote to re-zone a property over owner objection, but does not impose a 3/4 majority vote by commissions for any other zoning classification. That means that HB 2496 and SB 1488 would place a greater burden on historic zoning, which could lead to the loss of important historic resources. 2. The municipalities that do allow historic zoning over owner objection are not abusing that power. In fact, the City of Dallas has only designated 3 properties over owner objection in 46 years. 3. This bill would create a "one size fits all" for communities across Texas, taking away their power to decide how to regulate and protect their historic assets. Control of land use decisions is best decided at the local level, by the officials elected by those voters. Please contact your state elected officials BEFORE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 to let them know that you oppose HB 2496 and SB 1488. Legislators need to hear from people across the state so that they know we don't want unnecessary restrictions on how our community decides to protect our heritage assets. You may copy and paste any of the above, and make sure to tell them why preserving our community's heritage is important to you! Or you can call their office. Please email the bill authors below along with your representative. Rep. John Cyrier - [email protected] - (512) 463-0682 Rep. Sheryl Cole – [email protected] - (512) 463-0506 Sen. Dawn Buckingham – [email protected] - (512) 463-0124 To find out how to contact your legislators go to the “Who Represents Me” web site and enter your address. From there you can click on your legislators’ names to access their webpages and get contact information.