Eliseo Art Silva Studios

Eliseo Art Silva Studios #LAfilipinotownMural #ARTtivist/author of #FilipinosofGreaterPhiladelphia/ artist of PH #NationalityRoom of UPitt /founderof #LarryItliongDay Committee

"A weaver of history and heritage." "Art is poetry without words." Eliseo Art Silva is a contemporary artist, teacher, and author of Filipinos of Greater Philadelphia (Arcadia Publishing, 2012). He is internationally-known for the “Gintong Kasaysayan” Filipinotown mural, recognized by LA Weekly as one of the 20 iconic murals of Los Angeles. Silva has taught mural art at California State Dominguez Hills, the School District of Philadelphia in partnership with the Mural Arts Program and the California Polytechnic University Pomona. Silva was born in Manila in 1972, the same year Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law. A martial law baby, Silva completed his first mural on February 28, 1986 at the age of 14, just a few days after becoming part of the EDSA People Power Revolution. He received his high school education under full-time scholarship at the Philippine High School for the Arts where he was recognized with the Most Outstanding Student Award, the MARIA Arts Scholarship (for free art college education) and the Gold Medallion for the most outstanding visual artist. Silva also received the 2014 Alumni Achievement Award from Colegio De San Juan de Letran (Intramuros, Manila), where he completed his elementary education. He immigrated to the United States at the age of 17 in 1989, the same year Marcos passed away in Hawaii. He began his undergraduate art education at Otis College of art and Design in Los Angeles the same year the LA Riots erupted in 1992. Silva's work directly addresses the dehumanization of his culture by reconciling the history of his lineage with the history of painting. He completed his BFA at Otis College of Art and Design, was an artist-in-residence at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, and received his MFA at the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) Hoffberger School of Painting in Baltimore, MD. His work has been featured at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, Sweeney Art Gallery in Riverside, D.C`s Conner Contemporary Art, Cue Art Foundation in NY, the Nehru Gallery in India, the Piramide Cultural Center in Mexico, the Cultural Center of the Philippines, Canada`s Plug-In Gallery and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Silva is the recipient of the Award of Design Excellence from the Department of Cultural Affairs Los Angeles, a Visual Arts Fellowship Travel Grant from the Independence Foundation in Philadelphia and the Joan Mitchell Foundation, Inc. MFA Grant Award. He is the artist behind the “La Sierra Passages” 91 Freeway underpass murals in Riverside, CA; the Carlos Bulosan Memorial in Seattle, WA; the “Colton Crossings” underpass murals, the “a shenere un besere velt” Jewish/ Yiddishkeit mural in LA; the Philippine Nationality Room at the University of Pittsburg, PA; the “Price of Freedom” US Veterans Memorial in Lompoc, CA, the “Manifest Diversity” mural at California State University Dominguez Hills, and “Alab ng Puso: My Heart`s Sole Burning Fire”, the first outdoor Filipino-themed mural on the East Coast. He also designed significant landmarks in LA’s Historic Filipinotown. These include: the western gateway marker for the district and Unidad Park’s unique architectural features honoring Filipino heritage. During the Philippine Centennial celebrations, he designed the Rose Parade floats representing the Philippines in 1997 and 1998 (both of which were awarded the International Trophy); and his works were included in the Philippine Centennial capsule, Rizal Park, Philippines. He is the founding president of the Pennsylvania chapter of the Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS-PA), served as events coordinator for Gawad Kalinga Philippines Community Development Foundation in Pennsylvania, established and organized LIDC (Larry Itliong Day Committee), and serves as the project leader and artistic director of the Annual Larry Itliong Day Parade and Festival in LA`s Historic Filipinotown since it began in 2015.

Philippines:Urduja, ca. 1350–1400 AD) a legendary warrior princess who is recognized as a heroine in Pangasinan, Philipp...
06/19/2020

Philippines:
Urduja, ca. 1350–1400 AD) a legendary warrior princess who is recognized as a heroine in Pangasinan, Philippines. The name Urduja appears to be Sanskrit in origin, and a variation of the name "Udaya", meaning "arise" or "rising sun", or the name "Urja", meaning "breath". A historical reference to Urduja can be found in the travel account of Ibn Battuta (1304 – possibly 1368 or 1377 AD), a Muslim traveler from Morocco.

The legendary women warriors in Southeast Asia History. 🔱

Indonesia :
Admiral Keumalahayati, (fl. 16th century), an admiral in the navy of the Aceh Sultanate, which ruled the area of modern Aceh Province Sumatra, Indonesia. She was the first woman admiral in the modern world. Her troops were drawn from Aceh's widows and known as the "Inong Balee", after the Inong Balee Fortress near the city of Banda Aceh.

Philippines:
Urduja, ca. 1350–1400 AD) a legendary warrior princess who is recognized as a heroine in Pangasinan, Philippines. The name Urduja appears to be Sanskrit in origin, and a variation of the name "Udaya", meaning "arise" or "rising sun", or the name "Urja", meaning "breath". A historical reference to Urduja can be found in the travel account of Ibn Battuta (1304 – possibly 1368 or 1377 AD), a Muslim traveler from Morocco.

Thailand :
Thao Thep Kasattri (ท้าวเทพกระษัตรี) and Thao Sri Sunthon (ท้าวศรีสุนทร) were styles awarded to Than Phuying Chan (ท่านผู้หญิงจัน), wife of the then recently deceased governor, and her sister, Khun Muk (คุณมุก), who defended Phuket Province in the late 18th century. According to popular belief, they repelled a five-week invasion by Burmaese in 1785, by dressing up as male soldiers and rallying Siamese troops. Chan and Muk were later honored by King Rama I with the Thai honorific Thao, as Thao Thep Kasattri and Thao Sri Sunthon, respectively. The "Heroine's Monument" honouring them is situated on the main highway (402) between the Phuket International Airport and Phuket town.

Vietnam :
The Trung Sisters, (c. 12 - 43 AD), known in Vietnamese as Hai Bà Trưng ("the two Trưng ladies"'), and individually as Trưng Trắc (Traditional Chinese: 徵側; pinyin: Zhēng Cè) and Trưng Nhị (Traditional Chinese: 徵貳; pinyin: Zhēng Èr), were two first century AD women leaders who repelled Chinese invasions for three years, winning several battles against considerable odds, and are regarded as national heroines of Vietnam.

Myanmar :
Shin Sawbu (Burmese: ရှင်စောပု, pronounced [ʃɪ̀ɰ̃ sɔ́ bṵ]; Mon: သေဝ်စါဝ်ပေါအ်; 1394–1471) was queen regnant of Hanthawaddy from 1454 to 1471. Queen Shin Sawbu was also known as Binnya Thau (ဗညားထောဝ်) or Old Queen in Mon. Queen Shin Sawbu and Queen Jamadevi of Haripunjaya are the two most famous among the small number of queens who ruled in mainland Southeast Asia.

Malaysia :
Tun Fatimah was a well-known heroine and daughter of Tun Mutahir the Malaccan bendahara (prime minister) who lived during the 16th century. She was married to Malacca's Sultan Mahmud Shah.

Cr. to owners
Ar. Admin.

FILIPINO organizations, businesses, artists, local elected officials, and community leaders unveiled a new mural on the ...
06/19/2020
‘Mabuhay’ mural paying tribute to front line workers unveiled in Queens’ Little Manila

FILIPINO organizations, businesses, artists, local elected officials, and community leaders unveiled a new mural on the southeast corner of 69th Street and Roosevelt Avenue known as “Little Manila” on Friday, June 12.

FILIPINO organizations, businesses, artists, local elected officials, and community leaders unveiled a new mural on the southeast corner of 69th Street and Roosevelt Avenue known as “Little Manila” on Friday, June 12. The ceremony extended its appreciation to Filipino businesses and healthcare w...

Lapulapu in Da Haus! Woot-woot!
06/16/2020
People Share 29 Statues That Are Better Than The Ones Torn Down By The Protesters

Lapulapu in Da Haus! Woot-woot!

If you’re following the news, you probably heard that protestors took down the statue of Edward Colston, an English merchant who was known for being involved in slave trade, in Bristol. Well, the takedown of this statue actually inspired other protesters to tear down numerous other statues who dep...

Congratulations To the artist-team, and all Filipino Americans in NY!As I always say during my mural dedications: "Where...
06/15/2020
New Mural in Woodside Honors Its Filipino Community | Jackson Heights Post

Congratulations To the artist-team, and all Filipino Americans in NY!

As I always say during my mural dedications: "Where there is ART there is change".....as this is the first public art Filipino mural in the Big Apple! The 2nd one in the east coast.

***
Artists and community members Princes ‘Diane’ De Leon, Ezra Undag, Hannah Cera, Jaclyn Reyes, and Xenia Diente painted the mural, borrowing details from Philippine culture. For example, the typography is based on lettering found on iconic jeepneys, colorfully painted jeeps used for public transportation in the Philippines.

The community has tried to create a Philippine mural in the Little Manila neighborhood for more than 10 years, according to organizers. The “Mabuhay” mural finally came to fruition thanks to the Little Manila Queens Bayanihan Arts, a year-long project that seeks to create public art installations in Woodside.

Woodside community members unveiled a new mural Friday honoring the Filipino neighborhood and the efforts of Filipino healthcare workers and businesses during the height of the coronavirus pandemic.

The mural reads “Mabuhay,” a Philippine expression that has several meanings, including “cheers”, “welcome” and “may you live.”

It was painted on the side wall of the restaurant Amazing Grace on the southeast corner of 69th Street and Roosevelt Avenue in the Filipino section of the neighborhood known as “Little Manila.”

Filipino organizations, businesses, artists, community leaders and local elected officials unveiled the mural Friday, on Philippine Independence Day.

The mural is a special thanks to Filipino healthcare workers who risked — and gave — their lives on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Community leader, Sockie Laya Smith, read names of Filipino healthcare workers who died from COVID-19 during the unveiling ceremony.

“This is to remember them as human beings—not simply as a labor percentage, a deceased statistic, or an immigration number,” she said. “We thank you, say thy name. Mabuhay!”

June 15, 2020 By Allie Griffin Woodside community members unveiled a new mural Friday honoring the Filipino neighborhood and the efforts of Filipino

We defeated Spain in 1898. June 12, is the true Independence Day of the Philippines. July 4, 1946 did not have a Declara...
06/15/2020

We defeated Spain in 1898.

June 12, is the true Independence Day of the Philippines.

July 4, 1946 did not have a Declaration of Independence. The document was the Treaty of Manila which states that the USA “recognizes” Philippine Independence.

That document restored June 12,1898 as Independence Day. That’s because our freedom and Independence was never theirs to grant. They stole our freedom and independence on Feb 4,1899 and violently forced the Americanization Movement of the Philippines on all of us for 14 years at the cost of more than a million lives.

Only Filipinos themselves can declare independence and assert their birthright to liberty and self-determination.

Recognizing July 4, 1946 would be the equal of the US celebrating the day France recognized their Independence- as their Independence Day. February 6,1778 was the date "The Treaty of Amity and Commerce" which recognized the United States as an independent nation was signed by France and the USA.

That Treaty is the US counterpart of the July 4,1946 Treaty of Manila which recognized and restored Philippine Independence.

Would the US ever do that? Celebrate the 6th of February 1778 as their independence day? Why would we?

Was USA and Mexico “independent” on the day they celebrate their respective independence days? NO.

It would take almost 9 years before England departed and Mexico 12 years after Spain ended their rule.

So what is celebrated on INDEPENDENCE DAY?

We honor and celebrate the document and collective action of our ancestors- "THE PEOPLE" as the main event and protagonist of the story. When the signers backed the war to embolden our soldiers, they were in essence replacing the Spanish Empire as the “new nation” through their bold step and the act of treason of the 176 signers- our Founding Fathers.

That was the sacred day when we launched our "Filipinization Movement" and proclaimed to the world that “THE. PHILIPPINES IS FOR FILIPINOS!”. For all generations thereafter and for all time. It is the singular, most significant date in our nation's history.

JUNE 12,1898 is our ONE AND ONLY INDEPENDENCE DAY, and will always be so as long as our archipelago is still on the map of the world.

“The only ones that celebrate July 4th as Independence Day are Americans”.- Emil Guillermo (responding with an essay regarding the debate whether 4th of July or June 12 should be Philippine Independence Day, Filipinas Magazine, June 12,1998).

❤️🇵🇭❤️

Friday, June 12 marks the 122nd Anniversary of the Declaration of Philippine Independence.⠀

With the theme “Kalayaan 2020: Tungo sa Bansang Malaya, Nagtutulungan, at Ligtas (Freedom 2020: Towards a Free, United, and Safe Nation), the day will be observed with a virtual flag-raising ceremony by all of the Philippine Diplomatic Missions in the U.S. ⠀

• • •⠀
A quick history lesson on Philippine Independence Day traces back over a century ago when the Philippines — after close to four centuries under Spain’s rule — declared independence on June 12, 1898.⠀

But June 12 didn’t mark the true liberation for the Philippines as the country in less than a year found itself under United States rule.⠀

It took years for the Philippines to gain independence from the U.S. Sometime during the Philippine-American War, U.S. President Teddy Roosevelt declared victory over the Philippines ironically on the fourth of July in 1902.⠀

After giving into the pressure of granting the Philippines independence and proclaiming amnesty between the two countries, William Howard Taft was elected as president and decided to put a halt on granting the Philippines independence.⠀

Despite being defeated in 1912 by President Woodrow Wilson, who favored Philippine independence, plans for a sovereign Philippines weren’t made until the mid-1930s.⠀

After one last set back due to World War II and the Japanese invasion of the Philippines, the Philippines was finally declared independent on July 4, 1946 through the Treaty of Manila.⠀

For 15 years, the Philippines celebrated its independence annually on July 4 until 1962 when Philippine President Diosdado Macapagal officially changed the date back to June 12. Finally on August 4, 1964, Macapagal signed Republic Act No. 4166 declaring the holiday.
#PhilippineIndependenceDay #Kalayaan2020 #ArawngKalayaan

NHCP Research & Resource Center
06/14/2020

NHCP Research & Resource Center

#NgayongArawSaKasaysayan

Tired and weary from after about a fortnight of constant travel from what is now Tagaytay in Cavite to the mountains of Montalban, Emilio Aguinaldo (then nursing a high fever suspected to be caused by Malaria) and his party managed to find sanctuary in to Licerio Geronimo's mountain stronghold in Puray. They were at that time making their way north towards Biak-na-Bato in San Miguel de Mayumo in Bulacan, where Mamerto Natividad has set up headquarters.

But their respite was short-lived, as the Spanish authorities were able to find their position and deployed two battalions to apprehend them. But the Spaniards got more than what they bargained for: their gross underestimation of the large number of revolutionary forces stationed in Puray (which at that time was headquarters for the Departmental Government for Central Luzon under Father Pedro Dandan), as well as the unfamiliar mountainous terrain of Montalban, led to their eventual defeat.

Three eyewitness accounts of the battle were written down for posterity: that of Aguinaldo (in his "Mga Gunita ng Himagsikan"), that of his secretary Carlos Ronquillo ("Ilang Talata tungkol sa Paghihimagsik nang 1896-1897") and that of the Spaniard Manuel Sastron ("La Insurreccion en Filipinas y Guerra Hispano-Americana"). All three books are part of the collections of the NHCP Serafin D. Quiason Library and Resource Center.

-------------------

Pagod matapos ang halos dalawang linggong paglalakbay mula Tagaytay patungong Montalban, nakahanap ng kanlungan si Emilio Aguinaldo (na noo'y inaapoy ng lagnat na bunsod ng hinihinalang malarya) at mga kasama sa himpilan ni Licerio Geronimo sa kabundukan ng Puray. Paparoon sana sila sa Biak-na-Bato sa San Miguel de Mayumo sa Bulacan, kung saan naghihimpil si Heneral Mamerto Natividad.

Ngunit sandali lamang ang kanilang naging pahinga, dahil agad silang natunton ng mga Espanyol na agad na nagpadala ng dalawang batalyon upang sila'y hulihin. Ngunit hindi inasahan ng mga ito ang dami ng mga rebolusyonaryong nagkukuta sa Puray (na siyang himpilan ng Gobierno Departmental ng Gitnang Luzon sa pamumuno ni Padre Pedro Dandan) pati na ang kasukalan ng mga bundok ng Montalban, dahilan upang sila'y matalo sa labanan.

Tatlong saksi sa labanan ang nakapag-ulat nito sa kanilang mga gunita: Si Aguinaldo (sa kanyang "Mga Gunita ng Himagsikan"), ang kanyang kalihim na si Carlos Ronquillo ("Ilang Talata tungkol sa Paghihimagsik nang 1896-1897") at ang kastilang si Manuel Sastron ("La Insurreccion en Filipinas y Guerra Hispano-Americana"). Tatlong sipi ng mga naturang aklat ay bahagi ngayon ng mga koleksiyon ng Aklatang Serafin D. Quiason ng Pambansang Komisyong Pangkasaysayan ng Pilipinas.

We are very honored, thrilled and grateful that the City of Los Angeles has finally fulfilled our cherished dream of a H...
06/14/2020

We are very honored, thrilled and grateful that the City of Los Angeles has finally fulfilled our cherished dream of a Historic Filipinotown Welcome Archway to become a reality.

This would not have come into fruition and blossomed the way it did without our beloved 'diwatas' (angels) to bless us and honor us with this wonderful gift: Councilmember Mitch O'Farrell and Commissioner Jessica Caloza. 💗💗💗

A new city landmark and destination that would signal to all that "We Are Here!" and "We have Arrived!"

Together with my co-designer (and former classmate from Letran College, Manila), Architect Celestino Geronimo, we offer this work as a gift to our alma mater's 400th anniversary (Letran), the 18th year anniversary of the designation of Historic Filipinotown, LA, along with the 122nd Independence Day of the Philippines!

Our heartfelt gratitude also goes to the HIFI Neighborhood Council led by Ms. Cecilia Ramos and Leonardo Pano Pandac for initiating the design competition several years ago.

This is our humble tribute to all our Frontliners who sacrificed, delivered and saved thousands of lives, not only in the City of Angels, but all over the world.

We salute you! Thank you for your selfless sacrifice! 💗💗💗

Happy Independence Day! Mabuhay ang Pilipinas! 🇵🇭🥳🇺🇸

(We named the new LA monument after the Philippines' iconic landmark, the 'Jose Rizal Monument' which is called "Motto Stella", from the Italian translation of 'Guiding Star'.)

#easterngateway #historicfilipinotownla #salakot #parol #sarimanok #gumamela #capiz #quemahouse #philippinenationalityroom #beverlyblvd #mitchofarrell #eliseoartsilva #el1zy #frontliners #phindependenceday #filipinoamericans #isangbagsak #talanggabay #mottostella #guidingstar #northstar #gikgik #torogan #maranao #pilotis #bahayngmaginoo #baybayin #siyemprearribasitempreletran #letrancollege

We are very honored, thrilled and truly grateful that the City of Los Angeles has finally fulfilled our decades-long che...
06/13/2020

We are very honored, thrilled and truly grateful that the City of Los Angeles has finally fulfilled our decades-long cherished dream of a Historic Filipinotown Welcome Archway to become a reality.

This would not have come into fruition and blossomed the way it did without our beloved 'diwatas' (angels) to bless us and honor us with this wonderful gift: Councilmember Mitch O'Farrell and Commissioner Jessica Caloza. 💗💗💗

A new city landmark and destination that would signal to all that "We Are Here!" and "We have Arrived!"

Together with my co-designer (and former classmate from Letran College, Manila), Architect Celestino Geronimo, we offer this work as a gift to our alma mater's 400th anniversary (Letran), the 18th year anniversary of the designation of Historic Filipinotown, LA, along with the 122nd Independence Day of the Philippines!

Our heartfelt gratitude also goes to the HIFI Neighborhood Council led by Ms. Cecilia Ramos and Leonardo Pano Pandac for initiating the design competition several years ago.

This is our humble tribute to all our Frontliners who sacrificed, delivered and saved thousands of lives, not only in the City of Angels, but all over the world.

We salute you! Thank you for your selfless sacrifice! 💗💗💗

Happy Independence Day! Mabuhay ang Pilipinas! 🇵🇭🥳🇺🇸

(We named the new LA monument after the Philippines' iconic landmark, the 'Jose Rizal Monument' which is called "Motto Stella", from the Italian translation of 'Guiding Star'.)

Link 1: https://www.welikela.com/heres-what-the-historic-filipinotown-eastern-gateway-will-look-like/

Link 2: https://www.asianjournal.com/usa/southerncalifornia/gateway-landmark-to-be-erected-in-los-angeles-historic-filipinotown-later-this-year/

A 'Gateway Guide' is still in the works and will be made available soon.

PRESS RELEASE:

COUNCILMEMBER O’FARRELL, BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS UNVEIL DESIGN RENDERINGS FOR HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN EASTERN GATEWAY PROJECT

This forthcoming landmark will celebrate the culture and contributions of the Filipino American community while greeting visitors to this vibrant neighborhood in the 13th District.

HISTORIC FILIPINOTOWN - In recognition of Philippine Independence Day, Councilmember Mitch O’Farrell unveiled the renderings for the forthcoming Historic Filipinotown Eastern Gateway Project, a long-awaited milestone in the Filipino American community that will serve as a welcome to this officially designated neighborhood in the City of Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles region is home to over half a million Filipinos, the largest population outside the Philippines. This gateway serves to honor Filipino heritage, and is just one of the many projects that Councilmember O’Farrell has worked on with local residents to improve the quality of life and cultural visibility in the neighborhood.

“This project represents a continuation of creating landmarks celebrating the diversity of the 13th District and the City,” said Councilmember O’Farrell of the gateway. “Once completed later this year, Historic Filipinotown will have a permanent reminder that showcases the beauty and storied history of the Filipino community. I’m proud to have partnered with Commissioner Jessica Caloza, Bureau of Engineering, one of the great Filipino artists of our time Eliseo Art Silva, and community members who have contributed their efforts, creativity, and ideas toward this soon-to-be point of pride for the neighborhood.”

After years of planning, conversations with the community accelerated this past year: Meetings and webinars were held with non-profit organizations, community leaders, small businesses, and neighbors that culminated in the proposed design.

“The key to building and enhancing the beautiful neighborhood we all know as Historic Filipinotown has always been community. The community has worked hard and was committed to bringing the Eastern Gateway to life, and with Councilmember O’Farrell’s leadership, we are finally making it happen,” said Commissioner Jessica Caloza. “Being the first historic cultural designation in the U.S. for the Filipino American community means so much to us in Los Angeles. As a first generation Filipina American, I am proud to see us celebrate and recognize our diversity and continue building it into the fabric of our City.”

In 2018, Councilmember O’Farrell initially committed $152,000 for the Eastern Gateway Project, however he identified additional funding through cost savings on another project. O’Farrell committed a total of $452,000 for this landmark.

This project is part of a larger plan, in collaboration with the Board of Public Works, to improve the 1st Street Bridge with a seismic retrofit and lane enhancements. The Eastern Gateway pays tribute to both the legacy and the bright future of the Filipino American community in the City of Los Angeles.

"My heartfelt gratitude to the City of Los Angeles and our esteemed Councilmember Mitch O'Farrell, the indefatigable collaboration with our Historic Filipinotown community organizations and neighbors, and the Department of Public Works through the invaluable leadership of Commissioner Jessica Caloza for giving us that rare opportunity to honor our Filipino American heroes and their stories,” said Silva. “This magnificent new gateway will welcome everyone to Historic Filipinotown. It’s a fitting tribute to the many courageous men and women on the frontlines - brave warriors such as our numerous Filipino healthcare workers. The Gateway not only signals that Filipino Americans have finally arrived, -- it also symbolizes the valor of the frontliners in our city.”

Silva says the name is fitting - ‘Talang Gabay: Our Guiding Star’. The design elements include: the Parol, the Gumamela flower, and the Sarimanok, all symbols with deep roots in the Filipino culture. The proposed location of the Eastern Gateway will span across Beverly Boulevard, near the Philippine mural at Unidad Park, also painted by Eliseo Silva.

Since being sworn into office, Councilmember O’Farrell has worked to improve the Historic Filipinotown community: he championed a street light and bus stop improvement project; he identified funding to improve pedestrian safety along Beverly Boulevard; he partnered with community groups and the Los Angeles Department of Transportation to slow traffic and improve the infrastructure for all users of Temple Street.

###
Celes GJr Frank Liongson Jhennie Caldito- Villar Noel Alumit Norman de los Santos Cheryl Castro Johnny Lee Anabel Bowen Kristine Silva Antonio Arambulo Dennis Singson Rhacel Salazar Parrenas Mel Orpilla Armyj Pangilinan Alwin Reamillo Awit Nadera Leonardo Gerry Betita Anuran Renz Marion D. Katigbak Joe Bernardo Lydia Golez Myra Viado Manalac Vincent Arambulo Vince A. Sales Carlito Camahalan Amalla Angelo Jarin Aguinaldo Ambeth R. Ocampo Edcel Grex Lagman J Melchor Quitain Jr. Cyriaco Lopes Ellen Altfest Ell Cruz Joe Santarromana Gayle Isa Edwin Ramoran Auie Serrato Paul Ian Serrato Helen Lee Bo Arambulo-Sanchez Mayee Arambulo Béjar Joe Silva Fely Santos Rodolfo L. Silva Christina S Flores Connie Arambulo-Agojo Maryann Sivak Tina Florendo Purpura Fernando Zialcita

Address

Corona, CA
92879

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Eliseo Art Silva Studios posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Eliseo Art Silva Studios:

Videos

An artist driven to bridge the intensity of the multiple golden ages of the Philippines with the American cultural landscape.

“Art is the progenitor of civilizations. Artists are driven to motivate people and their communities; and elevate the memories of the land in order to provide a 'seat at the table' for all.” Eliseo Art Silva is the artist behind the Gintong Kasaysayan Filipinotown mural of Los Angeles, the first artwork to honor Larry Itliong and the Filipino American farmworker's pivotal role as the catalyst of the 1965 Delano Grape Strike. It is recognized as the "most significant Filipino mural in the country" by the LA Times and as "one of the 20 iconic murals of Los Angeles" by LA Weekly. Created by Silva when he was 22 years old, the enduring impact of the 1995 LA Filipino mural as the earliest cultural landscape to depict the most significant Filipino American event (1965 Grape Strike), may have help clinch the designation of the neighborhood as Historic Filipinotown (seven years after its completion), the celebration of Larry Itliong Day in the City of Carson (fifteen years after its unveiling) and the state-wide, annual celebration of Larry Itliong Day in California (twenty years after its dedication). Though the mural was formally dedicated on June 24, 1995, it was completed and unveiled with a second celebration (only after eight months of work ever since actual painting commenced) on October 24,1995, the earliest Larry Itliong Day celebration in the country.

Silva was born in Manila in 1972, the same year Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos declared martial law. A martial law baby, Silva completed his first mural on February 28, 1986 at the age of 14, just a few days after becoming part of the EDSA People Power Revolution. In 1989, Silva emigrated to the United States at the age of 17, after graduating from the Philippine High School for the Arts (PHSA) with full honors.

Silva received his BFA at Otis College of Art and Design and received a Getty Multicultural Arts Management Internship at the Social and Public Arts Resource Center (SPARC), which started his journey in creating over a hundred public art installations throughout the United States. He obtained an MFA at Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) and received a Joan Mitchell Foundation MFA Grant. Silva was also a 2002 Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture fellow.

Eliseo's other public art projects beyond painted walls are also landmark destinations of Los Angeles. These include the Western Gateway Marker for Historic Filipinotown and the Filipino features of Unidad Park, which include the entrance walkway, the centerpiece gathering place (after the Cordillera Dap-ay) and the community garden honoring the rice terraces of the Philippine Cordilleras. Silva also co-designed two floats entered by the Philippines at the 1997 and 1998 Rose Parade in Pasadena to celebrate the Philippine Centennial. He has recently completed projects for the Philippine Nationality Room at the University of Pittsburgh and the Mabuhay Credit Union's "Philippine Masters Collection" series of oil on canvas paintings in Carson, CA.

His work has been featured at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History and the Conner Contemporary in Washington DC, the Cue Art Foundation Gallery in New York, the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, the Painted Bride Art Center in Philadelphia, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. His public art has been installed in Pittsburgh, PA; Los Angeles, CA; Sacramento, CA; Sitka, AK; and Seattle, WA.

He has been the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including an Artist's Travel Grant from the Independence Foundation, an Arts Scholarship from the Ahmanson Foundation and the National Arts Association, the Liquitex Excellence in Art Purchase Award from Binney and Smith, the International Trophy from the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, the Award of Design Excellence from the Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs, the 2014 Alumni Achievement Award, and as one of the recipients of the 400 “Grandes Figuras” award from Colegio De San Juan De Letran in celebration of the school's 400th anniversary in 2020.

eliseoartsilva.com

Nearby museums