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A Historic Filipinotown marker in Los Angeles is set to be unveiled this year, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) s...
05/25/2021
Historic Filipinotown marker set to rise in Los Angeles – Manila Bulletin

A Historic Filipinotown marker in Los Angeles is set to be unveiled this year, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said on Wednesday.

In a statement, Los Angeles Commissioner for the Board of Public Works Jessica Caloza said the gateway, which will be the largest and “most famous Filipino-American artwork,” will be unveiled in October this year.

Consul General Edgar Badajos called Caloza to discuss the Historic Filipinotown Eastern Gateway Project on May 17.

The gateway was designed by Eliseo Silva who is best known for his Gintong Kasaysayan mural at Unidad Park at the Historic Filipinotown.

The mural was also described as the largest, “most famous Filipino American artwork” in the United States.

Historic Filipinotown is a neighborhood that offers a mix of traditional and trendy Filipino eateries.

Caloza also discussed the upcoming activities of the Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Committee (APAHMC) where she was appointed as one of the co-chairmen.

Badajos, meanwhile, expressed his support to Caloza and her committee’s projects, especially those that will address the rising number of hate crimes against Asian and Asia-Pacific Islander communities in the US.

News / World / Historic Filipinotown marker set to rise in Los Angeles SHARE 0 Share it! [mashshare] News, World Historic Filipinotown marker set to rise in Los Angeles Published May 20, 2021, 8:41 AM by Jaleen Ramos A Historic Filipinotown marker in Los Angeles is set to be unveiled this year, the....

This week, the Philippines is marking a significant event in the history of European colonialism in the Asia-Pacific reg...
04/27/2021
Ferdinand Magellan's death 500 years ago is being remembered as an act of Indigenous resistance

This week, the Philippines is marking a significant event in the history of European colonialism in the Asia-Pacific region — the 500th anniversary of the death of Portuguese explorer Fernão de Magalhães (more commonly known as Ferdinand Magellan).

The Philippines government is hosting a series of events to mark the role that Indigenous people played in Magellan’s contested first circumnavigation of the earth in the 16th century.

European history books celebrate the expedition as a three-year Spanish-led voyage, carrying 270 men on five ships. But Filipino commemorations remind audiences that Magellan died halfway through the expedition in the Philippines and that only one ship with just 18 survivors limped home to Seville.

In particular, Filipinos remember how Lapu Lapu, the datu (leader) of the island of Mactan, inspired a force of Indigenous warriors to defeat Magellan’s crew — and the Spanish threat to their sovereignty — on April 27, 1521.

The Filipino commemorations show what an Indigenous-centred government approach to imperial history in the Pacific can look like. They also sit in stark contrast to the exhibitions, reenactments and publications that marked the 250th anniversary of James Cook’s arrival in Australia and New Zealand in recent years.

These commemorations mostly upheld the unique bravery of the British navigator, sidelining potentially deeper discussions of the violence to Indigenous people he and his crew also brought.

Despite these serious concerns, the Filipino approach to the era of European expansion offers a refreshing contrast to the dominant stories about Cook in Australia and New Zealand. It is not simply adding in Indigenous voices or awarding Indigenous people co-star status on commemorative occasions.

Rather, the Filipino attitude to Magellan flips colonial history on its head by focusing on Indigenous resistance.

The promise of decolonised public histories in the Pacific is not to punish, shame or settle scores. It is instead intended to help forge as-yet undreamed futures for the region that place original sovereigns at their heart.

The Philippines is taking an Indigenous-led approach to remembering European colonialism in the Pacific — a refreshing contrast to the dominant stories about James Cook in Australia and New Zealand.

Timeline Photos
04/25/2021

Timeline Photos

Congratulations Eugene Torre! What an honor for our country as well! 🇵🇭

You're in a league of your own! 💯

#POC #WorldChess #HallOfFamer

📷 Wikimedia Commons

04/23/2021

Rob Bonta has got what it takes to become a household name representing and embodying the Filipino American Story in the United States!

Future US Senator? Future US Vice President? Future US President?

The question is no longer why not? The real question is when?

What is most interesting to note, however, is that the first bread introduced to the Philippines was none other than the...
04/18/2021
Is pandesal really Filipino?

What is most interesting to note, however, is that the first bread introduced to the Philippines was none other than the Eucharistic bread.

The rajahs of both Limasawa and Butuan—Rajah Siagu and Rajah Colambu—and the other natives with them partook of this at the Easter mass presided by Fr. Pedro de Valderrama, the chaplain of Magellan’s fleet.

This was real bread, not the round flat host that Catholics today know, as pointed out by Fr. Mark Vincent Salang of the diocese of Maasin when I interviewed him and Fr. Johnrey Sibi about the first Easter mass recorded by Pigafetta on a show I host on the Catholic site Dominus Est.

I asked, “Father, considering that Magellan’s fleet had been travelling since 1519 and they only landed in the Philippines in 1521, how did Fr. Pedro Valderrama ensure that there would be enough hosts to last them that long?”

Salang pointed out that most likely, Valderrama baked a fresh batch of unleavened bread for the Easter morning mass. After all, the hostia or sacramental bread is easy to make using just flour, water and salt.

Now that I think about it, pandesal or pan de sal translates to salt bread. For all we know, it could have its origins from that very first bread baked by Valderrama for the first Easter mass in Limasawa.

Whatever its origins, we know for sure that pandesal is 100-percent Pinoy, not Portuguese, not Mexican, not even Spanish.

Dining guide Eater even has this to say, “The soft and airy flour roll is as close as it comes to a national dish.” While this statement is a bit of a stretch—it’s just bread, not a dish—I think we can agree that it is definitely, unarguably Filipino.

More from the author on Instagram @margauxsalcedo, margauxsalcedo.com or dominusest.ph/breadandwine.

Previously, I wrote about the food chronicled by Antonio Pigafetta, the Italian historian who was with Ferdinand Magellan when he landed in the Philippines. Wanting to learn more about this, Fr.

In a surprising move, the Philippines sent its strongest response yet against China’s expansion into the West Philippine...
04/18/2021
China Backs Away as Philippines and U.S. Send Impressive Fleet to West Philippine Sea

In a surprising move, the Philippines sent its strongest response yet against China’s expansion into the West Philippine Sea. Not since 2012 has the Philippines moved its naval forces to the West Philippine Sea to challenge China’s militarization of the area.

In March, the Philippines reported the presence of 220 Chinese vessels at Julian Felipe Reef. That number has been reduced to fewer than 10 as of April 13.

Below are photos taken by the Philippine Coast Guard on April 13 and 14 showing Philippine and Chinese vessels at Julian Felipe Reef.

The Philippines sent four of its most advanced warships to the West Philippine Sea to challenge China’s increasing activities at Julian Felipe Reef. Among the units it deployed are its two brand-new missile-guided frigates, the BRP Jose Rizal and the BRP Antonio Luna. It also deployed warplanes to monitor the area.

By April, the Chinese vessels have dissipated to a couple of dozen, a clear sign of China backing down in response to the forceful reaction from the Philippines and the U.S.

China used the same strategy in the past whenever it wanted to militarize a Philippine reef: It would send a large flotilla of paramilitary “fishing boats” to the area to scare away other vessels, then its dredgers would follow, destroying precious corals to create artificial islands over the reef. Julian Felipe Reef would have ended up with the same fate.

An Unexpected Philippine Response
Ever since the 2012 standoff at Scarborough Shoal between China and the Philippines, the latter has opted not to send warships from the navy but relied on vessels from the Philippine Coast Guard instead to assert its presence in the West Philippine Sea. It was because of the ongoing international arbitration with China that the Philippines eventually won in 2016—the Philippines did not want to jeopardize its case and be construed as an aggressor.

But ever since then, the country had downplayed Chinese incursions into the West Philippine Sea.

The latest development proves significant, not only because the Philippines actually challenged China, but also because it is the first time it has sent a weapon of war to assert itself. To the Chinese generals, that is something to be very serious about. Historically, China respects force, no matter how seemingly small it is.

China's pulled out most of its ships at Julian Felipe Reef.

NEW YORK — A play by Filipino American Luis Francia exploring the profound consequences and culture clashes that resulte...
04/18/2021
Fil-Am poet-historian pens new play on Magellan

NEW YORK — A play by Filipino American Luis Francia exploring the profound consequences and culture clashes that resulted from Ferdinand Magellan’s arrival in the Philippines in 1521 will be presented by New York University (NYU).

In “Black Henry,” the Portuguese explorer’s disastrous encounter with people of the islands complicates the life of his Malay slave, Enrique, who serves as a go-between for the Spanish conquistadors and the islands’ peoples, and irrevocably alters the archipelago’s character and destiny.

Author of the book History of the Philippines: From Indios Bravos to Filipinos, Francia’s other plays include “The Strange Case of Citizen de la Cruz.”

He is adjunct professor of Filipino on faculty at the university’s Department of Social and Cultural Analysis. Francia writes the column “The Artist Abroad” for INQUIRER.net USA and Canada. He’s also a published poet.

Global

The virtual presentations are produced by the university’s Sulo: Philippine Studies Initiative (Sulo) and the school’s King Juan Carlos Center (KJCC). The play is part of a program of events commemorating the quincentennial of the 1521 voyage.

Mirroring the voyage’s circumnavigation of the globe, the cast is comprised of actors from across oceans: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Seattle, and the Philippines.

Directed by Claro de los Reyes, founding artistic director of Atlantic Pacific Theater with costume, scenic and graphic designs by Cynthia Alberto, Francis Estrada and Charles Reynoso.

The presentation on April 25, 6:30pm EST, will be followed by a talkback with the playwright, director and Nerissa Balce from State University of New York (SUNY) Stony Brook’s Department of Asian and Asian American Studies.

In “Black Henry,” the Portuguese explorer’s disastrous encounter with people of the islands complicates the life of his Malay slave, Enrique.

Confronting racism in America: past, present and futureBY BEA RODRIGUEZ-FRANSENI encountered excerpts from letters of Am...
04/18/2021
Confronting racism in America: past, present and future - NCClinked

Confronting racism in America: past, present and future
BY BEA RODRIGUEZ-FRANSEN

I encountered excerpts from letters of American soldiers writing home, one of which hit close to home, literally: “We bombarded a place called Malabon, and then we went in and killed every native we met, men, women, and children.” Malabon is my hometown, where I went to elementary school and learned that the Americans were our allies and saviors from the oppressive Spanish colonizers.

To this day, many Filipinos regard white Americans as culturally superior. I, for one, grew up ashamed of my flat nose; my sister continues to whiten her skin with all sorts of lotions; English remains the language of power; and many prefer American goods over native ones. This cultural inferiority complex, coined as colonial mentality, remains deep-seated in the Filipino psyche. It is an expression of the profound pain that Filipinos have internalized; a result of the trauma we collectively experienced during and long after the abusive American regime.

When I asked fellow Filipinos and my American friends about this war, no one knew about it. Imagine that: Americans WON this major war, and they didn’t know about it. They knew a lot about the Spanish-American War—where Filipinos fought as American allies—but not about the war that happened immediately after it, which propelled the United States to become full-fledged imperialists.

What makes this period in our shared history especially horrifying is the deceit that remains unacknowledged to this day. In January 1899, President McKinley proclaimed the “Benevolent Assimilation” policy, stating that they arrived in the Philippines as friends, to teach the Filipinos the art of self-government. The US refused to acknowledge the independent Philippine Republic, established by its first President Emilio Aguinaldo, who had led the Filipinos to gain independence by defeating Spain. Instead, they chose to infantilize and call us indios and savages (See political cartoons.)

I am also working on a final project to complete my Master’s degree: a story cycle celebrating the richness of Philippine mythology. I intend to continue writing about the beauty of the Filipino culture, as a way to unlearn colonial mentality. For me, art is one of the most powerful ways to heal. It is also one of the ultimate weapons against societal problems.

After all, our Philippine national hero was a novelist whose books inspired a nation to revolt against its colonizers. As award-winning Filipino author Gina Apostol wrote once: “Some say the [Philippine] country is distinct because it was created by a novel—Jose Rizal’s Noli Me Tangere.” Just this past November, Apostol published Insurrecto, a groundbreaking novel about the Philippine-American War. I believe hers is one of the most powerful contributions by any artist to our current generation and to many more after ours.

“Ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinanggalingan ay hindi makararating sa paroroonan.” Translation: “One who does not know how to look back at where they came from will never get to their destination.” – Jose Rizal, Philippine novelist and national hero When I read the article by Jojo, Cynth...

Experience Authentic Filipino Flavors At This Vibrant Food, Art & Music Festival Coming To L.A.
04/16/2021
Experience Authentic Filipino Flavors At This Vibrant Food, Art & Music Festival Coming To L.A.

Experience Authentic Filipino Flavors At This Vibrant Food, Art & Music Festival Coming To L.A.

—L.A.’s authentic Southeast Asian experience. FAHMFest’s debut celebration will transform the historic Port of Los Angeles into a cultural mecca, brimming with food, art, dance, live music and fashion of the 7,640 islands. Get a taste of true Southeast Asian spirit brought to life through 500,...

1. A Golden Age when the country became widely known as the "Pearl of the Orient Seas" from 1821-1900.2. The Generation ...
04/16/2021
What Did Spain Contribute to the Philippines? | La Jornada Filipina in English

1. A Golden Age when the country became widely known as the "Pearl of the Orient Seas" from 1821-1900.

2. The Generation of 1896/1898 was the greatest generation of Filipinos. That era when our valiant forebears elevated "The Filipino Story" as a "main event" in the global narrative, which earned for our people an equal "seat at the table" of power and influence, to play a world-role as Asia's first democratic and constitutional republic.

3. Manila became the world's first "Global City" which connected continents and countries together via the 250 years of the Manila Galleon Trade.

One teacher cites the contributions of Spain to the Philippine after the lukewarm response of some Filipinos regarding the arrival of the Spanish navy ship Elcano in March.

On 27 April 2021, the Filipino nation will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Victory at Mactan. Lapulapu, the defia...
04/16/2021

On 27 April 2021, the Filipino nation will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Victory at Mactan. Lapulapu, the defiant leader of Mactan who refused to acknowledge the King of Spain, served as among the inspirations of the founders of the Filipino nation from 1896-1898.

Emilio Jacinto, the Brains of the Katipunan, in a poem in 1895, reminded the members of the Katipunan that in their veins ran the blood of Lapulapu.

During the proclamation of Philippine independence on 12 June 1898 at Kawit, Cavite, Lapulapu was remembered.

Click the link to join the celebration https://nqc.gov.ph/en/joinus/.

#VictoryAndHumanity
#Ph500

On 27 April 2021, the Filipino nation will celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Victory at Mactan. Lapulapu, the defiant leader of Mactan who refused to acknowledge the King of Spain, served as among the inspirations of the founders of the Filipino nation from 1896-1898. Emilio Jacinto, the Brains of the Katipunan, in a poem in 1895, reminded the members of the Katipunan that in their veins ran the blood of Lapulapu. During the proclamation of Philippine independence on 12 June 1898 at Kawit, Cavite, Lapulapu was remembered.

Click the link to join the celebration https://nqc.gov.ph/en/joinus/.

#VictoryAndHumanity
#Ph500

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