Sanders Corps of Cadets Center

Sanders Corps of Cadets Center Exhibits addressing the famous Aggie traditions, born in the Corps, make it easy to understand why Aggies are so loyal.
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Inextricably linked in history, Texas A&M University and its Corps of Cadets honor their past, acknowledge the present, and look to the future through exhibits in the Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center. As you step through the doors, it’s obvious that you have entered a special place that strives to preserve the history, flavor, and mystique of the Texas A&M Corps of Cadets from its beginn

ing in 1876 to today. Recognition of Aggie contributions to state and nation is a common thread. In addition, the Metzger-Sanders Fi****ms Collection is one of the most important antique and commemorative firearm collections available to the public. Its value lies in the number and condition of the collection. The collection, with weapons dating back to the 14th century, presents a physical timeline of the history of fi****ms. The Sanders Corps of Cadets Center is a must-see for truly understanding what makes Texas A&M a unique American institution.

This new exhibition at the Bush Library and Museum features some 55 items from the collections of the Corps Center!
09/15/2023

This new exhibition at the Bush Library and Museum features some 55 items from the collections of the Corps Center!

For a limited time, the George H.W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum invites visitors to view its football exhibit encompassing Texas A&M’s almost 130-year history on the field.

Great documentary released by 12th Man Films; Standing Room Only: The Legend of the 12th Man.
11/08/2022

Great documentary released by 12th Man Films; Standing Room Only: The Legend of the 12th Man.

Standing Room Only: The Legend of the 12th Man for Texas A&M Aggies Football

Happy 30th Anniversary Corps Center!  And information about upcoming plans!
09/27/2022

Happy 30th Anniversary Corps Center! And information about upcoming plans!

Sam Houston Sanders Corps of Cadets Center Celebrates 30th Anniversary August 24, 2022 by rnelson Current view of the Corps Center Current view of the Corps Center Digital rendering of proposed renovations for the Corps Center Digital rendering of proposed renovations for the Corps Center Digital re...

On Monday, the Corps Center hosted the Texas Aggie Baseball Team for a tour highlighting the history of the Corps and Te...
09/16/2022

On Monday, the Corps Center hosted the Texas Aggie Baseball Team for a tour highlighting the history of the Corps and Texas A&M. The Corps Center Guard did a great job of touring the athletes around. Thanks to Texas A&M Athletics for sharing photos of the event!

08/24/2022
Want to find your brick at the Corps Center?
07/05/2022

Want to find your brick at the Corps Center?

07/05/2022
Our own Carly Davis is highlighted in an A&M IT article for her work in getting the brick database searchable from your ...
07/03/2022

Our own Carly Davis is highlighted in an A&M IT article for her work in getting the brick database searchable from your phone! Thank you Carly for all your hard work!

Mark Matusek and his son Kyle discover a brick remembering his uncle Marvin Matusek ’51. For 30 years the plaza outside the Sanders Corps of Cadet Center has been systematically paved brick

The Sanders Corps of Cadets Center has been nominated for best museum category on the Insite A-List Best of the Brazos V...
04/12/2022

The Sanders Corps of Cadets Center has been nominated for best museum category on the Insite A-List Best of the Brazos Valley! To help us, please vote April 11-May 13!
https://insitebrazosvalley.com/a-list #/gallery?group=407331

Corps Center Guard Volunteers at Museum of the American GISeveral members of the Corps Center Guard spent last Saturday ...
03/31/2022

Corps Center Guard Volunteers at Museum of the American GI
Several members of the Corps Center Guard spent last Saturday and Sunday volunteering at the Museum of the American GI’s Living History Weekend. Throughout the event, these cadets assisted the museum with parking, admission, and crowd control efforts. In their free time, the cadets were also able to ride in some of the museum’s military vehicles including tanks and participate in the other Living History Weekend activities!

We would like to thank the Corps Center Guard for using their weekend to assist in this event! Their efforts were greatly appreciated, and they went above and beyond in helping the local community with such a large event!

Well done, Corps Center Guard!

The Sam Houston Sanders Corps Center recently received assistance from current Corps Center Guard cadets and members of ...
03/17/2022

The Sam Houston Sanders Corps Center recently received assistance from current Corps Center Guard cadets and members of the Quad Moms organization. The volunteers helped with a number of tasks, including maintenance, cleaning and updating exhibits. The Quad Moms also made a significant contribution to the Corps Center’s Loan Program, with a generous donation of funds to purchase additional items. Many thanks to our cadets and the members of Quad Moms that took the time to assist the Corps Center. Their hard work and commitment to the success of the Corps of Cadets is greatly appreciated.

06/27/2018

The latest pair of boots to arrive at the Corps Center for the boot loan program has quite a back-story.

This is the page for "Texas Aggie Ring." It has long been foretold that, "One Aggie Ring Shall Rule Them All!"

The first Texas A&M "Aggie" ring was made in 1889. After a few changes the ring was standardized to its current design in 1899.

05/30/2018

A big thank you and shout out to the Quad Moms for donating another 5 Sam Brownes to the Corps Center loan program! We appreciate your generosity and kindness so much.

01/04/2018

Briggs Hall, Dorm 3. To continue our series to bring you the historical information on the namesakes of the Corps Dorms.

10/25/2017
Hitchhiking home to A&M

Article in The Battalion about Aggie Bags. What fun!

Although it has always been slightly dangerous to pick up hitchhikers, Aggie Bags were once a way for students to carry their belongings while also indicating that they were respectful

10/24/2017

Kiest Hall, Dorm 2. To continue our series to bring you the historical information on the namesakes of the Corps Dorms.

10/20/2017

The Texas Wanderer

10/20/2017

Thank you Texas Wanderer for the great shots of the Metzger Collection!

02/09/2017
Philo Hoope DuVal Jr.'s Obituary on Shreveport Times

Sad news to report. The author of "The Last Corps Trip" has taken his. "It's just another Corps Trip boys...."

Read the Obituary and view the Guest Book, leave condolences or send flowers. | Philo Hooper DuVal, Jr. Benton, LA - Mr. Philo Hooper DuVal, Jr., born June 10, 1930, passed away peacefully in his home at the age of 86 on Monday, February 6, 2017, after a lengthy illness.

11/07/2016

Thank you to the Quad Moms for sponsoring Sam Brownes for the loan program!

10/11/2016

We are all familiar with the Corps dorms by number. But do we know about the individuals for whom the dorms are named? We are starting a series to tell you a little bit more about these gentlemen. If you did not know, part of the renovation of the dorms on the Quad is a board recognizing each of the dorm namesakes with pictures and a biography. Our first featured namesake is Professor David W. Spence (Dorm 1).

10/07/2016

Our museum curator, Lisa Kalmus, was recognized this morning by the Texas A&M Bookstore in their First Friday Faculty Focus.

This month we are starting First Friday Faculty Focus! Our first winner is Lisa Kalmus, she is the curator of the Corps of Cadets Museum located in the Sanders Corps of Cadets Center. She has been the curator for 15 years. The museum is more than just the history of the Corps of Cadets but the origins of the University itself. It is Open to the Public Monday Through Friday from 8am-5pm. Feel free to stop by and say hi to Lisa and the other staff members at any time! Thank you so much Lisa for all that you do! We are so excited to start this Faculty Focus! If you want to nominate your favorite faculty member please email your nominations to [email protected] With their name and why you want to nominate them! Have a great Friday everyone!

02/16/2016

Congratulations to the cadets selected to become the senior leaders of the Corps of Cadets for the 2016-2017 school year! Cadets selected to lead our Corps next year are:

Corps Commander – Cecille Sorio

Deputy Corps Commander – Justin Martinez

Chief of Staff – Samuel Simmons

1st Brigade Commander – Zachary Butler

2nd Brigade Commander – Ian Greenhalgh

3rd Brigade Commander – Zachary Lanctot

1st Regiment Commander – Stuart Seelman

2nd Regiment Commander – Christopher Akin

3rd Regiment Commander – Austin Collard

1st Wing Commander – Daniel Schultz

2nd Wing Commander – Ricky Hill

3rd Wing Commander – Kenneth Griffing

Aggie Band Commander – Matthew Rollins

We are proud of all of our senior Corps leaders for next year, and look forward to working with all of them in what we are confident will be another successful year for our Corps!

12/07/2015

Exactly 100 years ago today...Looks like they decorated with Spanish moss.

11/12/2015

The Corps Center will be open this Saturday, noon-5:00 pm. BTHO WCU.

10/13/2015

The Corps Center will be open this Saturday, 10-1:30 pm. BTHO Alabama!

08/20/2015
Lt. General Hollingsworth Exhibit to be Moved

Corps Center was in The Eagle yesterday highlighting the Hollingsworth exhibit!

The display case of Lt. General James Hollingsworth, A&M class of '40, will be seen in different places on campus in the near future. During the next week, several pieces of the exhibit will be taken to a display at the Ash Leadership Learning Center, which is between dorms 5 and 7 at the cadets's…

08/18/2015

Countdown to FOW tomorrow! Expecting over 900 fish!

06/10/2015
Click here to support Lisa Kalmus & Mark Smith Scholarship by Brynn Biggs

Please take a look at the fundraising effort by a former Corps Center Guard commander.

Lisa Kalmus has been an important part in many cadets Corps Career while at Texas A&M. Unfortunately Lisa's husband, Mark Smith, lost his fight with on going health issues this past week. He leaves behind his wife, 2 daughters, a sister, his parents, and many more friends and family. Mark and...

02/24/2015

Full view of the exhibit for 40th anniversary of women in the Corps.

02/24/2015

Exhibit for 40th reunion of women in the Corps in Duncan for the weekend.

11/11/2014

Corps Center will be open Saturday, November 15 from 12:00-5:00. Look forward to seeing you there!

10/31/2014

Because of the 11:00 am kickoff this week, the Corps Center will not be open. Step-off will be at 9:30 am. Alternate route is scheduled for this Saturday.

10/08/2014

We've already gotten a call from Mississippi about coming for a visit. This Saturday, the Corps Center will be open from 12:00 noon to 6:00 pm. Hope to see you there! BTHOOM!

Address

Texas A&M University, 1400 TAMU
College Station, TX
77843

Opening Hours

Monday 8am - 5pm
Tuesday 8am - 5pm
Wednesday 8am - 5pm
Thursday 8am - 5pm
Friday 8am - 5pm

Telephone

+19798622862

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The evil Texas Fighting Aggie Band (FTAB) “magical witch” Rachel Talkington who works in the Corps Centre provided me these Corps Center Honor Guard names. “Douphrate, Blanchard, Emr, Rojo, and Curda”. Left to right.

The trumpet playing FTAB Aggie sophomore Bandsman on the far right knows how to operate a trumpet as well as any man or woman. I paid $100.00 last year for an Aggie Bandsman to play a trumpet of an Aggie Band alumnus buddy at a home game. My most awesome Alamo Basement Fighting Texas Aggie Ring says that he’ll pay the Aggie Band boy $200.00 to march and play our 1947 custom-made Rudy Mück Jazz Trumpet at a football game of our choice.

Alamo Basement Aggie Ring said, “Aggie Band Trumpet Boy best play first chair and have memorized the Aggie War Hymn and Noble Men of Kyle. There’s no place on a jazz trumpet for a sheet music holder.”
I’ve been carrying Paul W. Stanley’s ’42 A&M College of Texas Ring for almost two decades since his passing in 2003. The Sanders Corps Center at Texas A&M University graciously allowed me to donate this ring to be placed in their Corps Aggie Ring Collection.

I attended the “installation” of Paul Stanley’s Aggie Ring this morning. Select members of the Corps Center Honor Guard were present and performed the labor of opening the ring cases and reorganizing all of the rings so that the ring I donated had a permanent place at Texas A&M.

[While I have posted the following background information before, I shall post it again…]

Thanks to the help of the New York Public Library, I was able to track down a copy of “The History of the 30th Infantry Regiment” during World War II. A short summary of Lieutenant Paul W. Stanley’s actions follow:

During the third phase of the Anzio, Italy Campaign (3 March - 22 May 1944), an attack “Operation Mr. Green” was planned on a German stronghold northeast of Carano, Italy with 1LT Stanley’s F Company taking the lead for 25th April at 0330 hours. His orders were to “attack frontally against enemy positions at 0500 hours, cleaning out the positions and capture prisoners of war.” Then, they were to withdraw from the captured position, leaving one platoon to cover their withdrawal.


According to “History of the 30th Infantry Regiment,” “All excavation preparations for the operation were made noiselessly and under cover of darkness according to schedule.” Company E, 30th Infantry was tasked with the smoke mission to provide concealment for the Infantry. The signal for initiating the smoke was to be two red parachute flares fired by 1st Lieutenant Paul W. Stanley, F Company Commander. After a two-minute artillery barrage on the objective, F Company attacked. The tanks moved through gaps in enemy wire and opened fire on German automatic weapons.”

“Rising from their holes, shouting defiance, the men of F Company led by 1LT Stanley, began a headlong charge towards the enemy, believing him to be more or less stupefied by the tremendous shelling which had been placed on his positions shortly before. However, such was not the case; the enemy opened fire with machine guns, machine pistols, rifles, and mortars, inflicting many casualties forcing the company to approach by a series of rushes. The assault became a mass of individual advances on the part of the determined men, who, even flat on the ground, continued to worm their way forward.”

“When the assault was re****ed by intense, grazing machine-gun fire, Lieutenant Stanley ran and crawled 75 yards through that fire to the nearest tank and directed the destruction of the machine-gun nest. With shells bursting around him, [Lieutenant Stanley] moved fearlessly along his 250-yard front, encouraging his men and pressing the attack forward. Knocked off his feet by a close shell burst [Lieutenant Stanley] picked himself up, ran to his radio operator, and still, under artillery fire, directed the destruction of an enemy tank. This accomplished, he led the assault which overwhelmed the German line, and captured nine prisoners.”

“Lieutenant Stanley then ordered the planned withdrawal to take place.” The 30th Infantry History records, “During this withdrawal numerous additional acts of heroism were recorded. Lieutenant Stanley himself saw one of his platoons becoming disorganized under artillery and mortar concentrations and run into a minefield. Oblivious of his personal danger, Lieutenant Stanley dashed 100 yards through the shell fire to the platoon and directed his men to a prepared gap through the mines and barbed wire. As the withdrawal proceeded, Lieutenant Stanley was knocked unconscious by concussion from a shell burst. When he regained consciousness, Lieutenant Stanley searched the impact area for other casualties and although injured in his side, proceeded 350 yards through harassing artillery fire to rejoin his men and lead them in completing the withdrawal.”

Company F completed its “Mr. Green” mission with glory, killing an estimated 30 to 50 enemy soldiers and knocking out enemy strongpoints as ordered. His company’s casualties during the action were 3 killed, 25 wounded, 2 missing in action and one injured in action. “Throughout the entire infantry attack, F Company’s action was inspired. There were no stragglers; not one man so much as lagged behind during the assault and subsequent fire fight. Each man had been throughly briefed and knew what was expected of him individually and performed his task to the utmost of his ability.”

For his extraordinary heroism in this attack, 1st Lieutenant Stanley was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism. (Note: The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest military award that can be given to a member of the United States Army for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the DSC must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor.)

U.S. Army Archives:

“Award Synopsis: Captain (Infantry) Paul W. Stanley, United States Army, was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company F, 30th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 25 April 1944. Captain Stanley's outstanding leadership, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 3rd Infantry Division, and the United States Army.”

General Orders: Headquarters, Seventh U.S. Army, General Orders No. 16 (1945)

(Note: The Distinguished Service Cross is the second highest military award that can be given to a member of the U.S. Army for extreme gallantry and risk of life in actual combat with an armed enemy force. Actions that merit the Distinguished Service Cross must be of such a high degree that they are above those required for all other U.S. combat decorations but do not meet the criteria for the Medal of Honor.)

The second award listed for him was the “Silver Star Medal (SSM)” while assigned to the same unit and same position on 29 February 1944 in the same geographical location.

I should also explain that further research showed me that he was a First Lieutenant at the time both of these awards were earned and had become the Company Commander of F Company, 30th Infantry Regiment after his company commander and several of the other officers were killed in action.

===============

Paul W. Stanley’s Post-War Life:

On 7 May, 1943, while on leave, Paul W. Stanley married a woman who would be his wife for 60 years. Her name was “Ruth Anna Longlet” Ruth Anna died a few months after her husband Paul in 2003.

After being released from the military service in 1945, Paul Stanley worked for Pan American Oil Company as a mechanical engineer for over 20 years before his retirement. In 1955, he built their house at 2012 29th Street, Galveston, Texas performing much of the work himself and they both apparently lived there until shortly before their deaths. As of 2015, it is officially designated a Galveston landmark due to it’s unique design and architecture significance as a structure built in the Modernistic/International style typified by smooth wall surfaces, flat roof and a small ledge (coping) at the roof line.

Newspaper clippings from local Galveston papers over the years provided additional information:
Both Paul and his wife loved german shepherds and had several over the years. One of his shepherds was named “Prince.”

He spent four and a half years building his own airplane in his garage. He flew it for the first time on September 17, 1973. The newspaper clipping stated that Mr. Stanley reported, “The only problem after the first three hours was a heavy left wing.” Apparently, it had no electrical system and weighed only 752 pounds.

n 1977, Paul and Ruth Stanley were seen driving around Galveston in their new car, a rust and white colored Chevrolet Blazer.

Paul and Ruth had no children and were avid travelers. The two of them used to frequently visit the elderly in Galveston, Texas nursing homes.

Paul W. Stanley ’42 died on Feb 23, 2003 at the University of Texas Medical Branch Hospital, Galveston, Texas. He was 84 years old!

Ronald Claiborne
Texas A&M ’84
Trust us — our Summer ‘22 EBVers have “Howdy” down! We’ve hit them hard with all things A&M and even more Aggie entrepreneurship this week, and they’ve jumped in with both feet and a “Gig ‘em!” So, how does the water from the firehose taste so far, EBVers? 🌟

Thank you to a few more of our sponsors and partners who have hosted and welcomed these “vetrepreneurs” this week in a variety of ways, including Reynolds & Reynolds, Aggieland Outfitters, the Don & Ellie Knauss Veteran Resource and Support Center, Advent GX, the Sanders Corps of Cadets Center, and Southwood 4-H Club!
Advent GX Southwood 4-H Club Brazos County, TX Sanders Corps of Cadets Center Reynolds & Reynolds Aggieland Outfitters Don & Ellie Knauss Veteran Resource & Support Center at TAMU