Pritzker Military Museum & Library

Pritzker Military Museum & Library The PMML features books, exhibits, live webcasts, and audio podcasts about the military history and affairs.
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We are so proud with how our first ever Mid-Day Muster went yesterday! We were delighted to see so many members in atten...
02/28/2020

We are so proud with how our first ever Mid-Day Muster went yesterday!

We were delighted to see so many members in attendance, attentively listening to Dr. Havers present upon his dissertation. Our Assistant Director of Development, Linda Sterling, gave a brief introduction to the event in which she thanked members for the attendance and walked everyone through this new type of programming. She was followed by Dr. Havers’ discussion, which lasted around 25 minutes, and focused on the Japanese POW experience, specifically within the Changi POW Camp from 1942-1945, which was an outlier in the typical POW experience of the time.

We look forward to our next Mid-Day Muster with Education Outreach Coordinator at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, Jessica Hulton. Hulton’s discussion will take place on Tuesday, April 21st and will focus on the Holocaust and liberation efforts that took place following World War II. To reserve yourself a seat to this next Mid-Day Muster click this link here: https://bit.ly/399m6Zn

Take a look at this unique item from our collection! This clock is made of both wooden and metal materials and features ...
02/27/2020

Take a look at this unique item from our collection!

This clock is made of both wooden and metal materials and features two metal on either side of the wooden body of the clock that have floral designs. At the top of the clock there lives a thin metal piece in the shape of a circle with wings and a crown at the top. Within the circle, a laurel wreath and “RAF” is engraved, symbolizing the Royal Air Force of Great Britain. The clock portion itself has numbers 1-12, but also reads “8 Days” and “WALTHAM ROLLS-ROYCE”. The latter to seem to be indicating that the clock has to be wound every 8 days and that the clock was made by the Waltham Watch Company for Rolls Royce.

At the bottom of the clock, there’s a plague that reads, "CRASHED AT MASHAM NEAR RIPON, YORKSHIRE 27-2-18.". Additionally, if you turn the clock over it reads, “Made from a propeller hub of a B.E. (British Experimental) 2C observation 2-seater biplane which was made at the Royal Air-Craft Factory in Farnborough, England. Crashed at Masham near Ripon, Yorkshire, on Feb. 27, 1918.” This being said, it’s safe to say that the clock has been made from two wooden airplane propellers that were part of a plane that crashed #OnThisDay in 1918.

Learn more about what we have in our collection by visiting our website: https://bit.ly/2T5nt5E

We were honored to host yesterday’s Operation Herstory  ceremony in celebration of the first all-women honor flight. A l...
02/26/2020

We were honored to host yesterday’s Operation Herstory ceremony in celebration of the first all-women honor flight. A large group of women veterans, from every branch of the U.S. military, filed into our auditorium and saluted their male counterparts before sitting in on a press conference that detailed the evolution in Honor Flight Chicago’s wonderful mission. Among the group of male veterans participating in the ceremony was Angel Melendez, our Production Coordinator, who assisted some of the female veterans to the chairs, symbolizing the formal recognition of each women’s contributions.

This honor flight will host veterans who served in WWII, Vietnam and Korea. We are proud to be a part of this historic moment and honored to celebrate women’s stories of service through our books and Oral History Programs that highlight women’s contributions to military history.

Learn more about the ceremony: https://bit.ly/2Vqws34

Photo Credit: The Chicago Sun-Times

Did you know the first African American to serve in the United States Congress had served as a U.S. Army chaplain during...
02/25/2020

Did you know the first African American to serve in the United States Congress had served as a U.S. Army chaplain during the American Civil War?

#OnThisDay in 1870, Hiram Rhodes Revels became the first African American to be seated in the U.S. Senate, having been elected by the Mississippi legislature to fill the U.S. Senate seat once held by Jefferson Davis. Mississippi was granted Congressional representation the day before Revels was seated, after Mississippi met the criteria set forth for readmittance of states that had seceded. Senator Revels would subsequently be joined by fifteen other African Americans in Congress during Reconstruction.

Hiram Rhodes Revels was born in 1827 in Fayetteville, NC, a free person of color, the term used for those of mixed African, European and often Native American descent. Hiram later moved to Indiana in the early 1840s where he attended a Quaker school. He subsequently attended Darke County Seminary in western Ohio, becoming an ordained minister in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Hiram was second cousin to Lewis Sheridan Leary, an African American from Oberlin, Ohio. Leary would later be killed participating in John Brown’s 1859 Harpers Ferry raid. Reverend Revels traveled throughout the Midwest preaching during the early 1850s; his trips extended to Tennessee, Missouri and Kansas.

Following further religious studies at Knox College in Galesburg, IL from 1855-1857, Reverend Revels moved to Baltimore, MD, where he served as a minister. After the outbreak of the Civil War, Reverend Revels joined the U.S. Army, serving as a chaplain. Once recruitment of African Americans was authorized for army service, Revels recruited and organized a regiment in Maryland and another in Missouri. Hiram’s brother, Reverend Willis Revels, a minister in Indianapolis, IN, recruited and raised Indiana’s only African American regiment, the 28th USCT.

Hiram was assigned to the African Brigade during the Vicksburg campaign. The African Brigade was comprised of the 8th, 9th, 11th and 13th Louisiana (African Descent) Regiments and 1st Mississippi and 3rd Mississippi (African Descent) Regiments. The brigade was assigned to the Department of Northeast Louisiana and was responsible for guarding the vital supply depot at Milliken’s Bend, LA, fifteen miles northwest of Vicksburg, MS.

Reverend Revels experienced the horrors of combat when Walker’s Texas Division attacked the African Brigade on June 7, 1863. The Confederate assault began at 3:00 am, driving in the Union pickets and flanking the African Brigade’s line. Enfilading the brigade’s line with a withering fire, the African brigade suffered heavy casualties and was driven back toward the Mississippi River. The African American soldiers rallied and stubbornly held as the fighting devolved into hand to hand combat. The Confederate assaults were finally broken, pounded by cannon fire from two Union gunboats at the riverbank, forcing the Confederates to withdraw at noon.

The National Park Service offers an interpretation of the Battle of Milliken’s Bend at the Vicksburg National Military Park Visitors Center; there is also an interpretive panel on the Louisiana side of the Mississippi River at Grant’s Canal. The battlefield now lies beneath the Mississippi River, as the river has changed course since the Civil War. You can read more about the Battle of Milliken’s Bend in Milliken’s Bend: A Civil War Battle in History and Memory by Lucinda Barnickel, part of PMML’s circulating collection: https://bit.ly/3afPRYL

In honor of #BlackHistoryMonth, we wanted to re-introduce our following to 1st Lieutenant Diana J. Ramsey, who served in...
02/24/2020

In honor of #BlackHistoryMonth, we wanted to re-introduce our following to 1st Lieutenant Diana J. Ramsey, who served in the U.S. Army Nurse Corps as an Operating Room Nurse in Vietnam from 1967 to 1968.

Originally born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1945 Diana Ramsey immigrated to the United States with her family in 1955 at the age of 10 so that she and her siblings could receive a good education. Her family decided upon relocating to Connecticut to join family that had already established there. The education that Ms. Ramsey would go on to receive is what influenced and compelled her to go school to become a Nurse. After graduating high school in 1963, she enrolled in the Nursing Program at St. Francis College in New York. Ms. Ramsey would eventually join the U.S. Army after her completion of that nursing program, following in the footsteps of family that served in the British military and U.S. Army.

She reported to Fort Sam Houston, Texas for Basic Officer Training in 1966 and was eventually assigned to Letterman Army Hospital in San Francisco for Advanced Operating Room Nurse Training. Slated to be stationed at Ft. Riley, Kansas after advanced training, she was actually mobilized to the 67th EVAC Hospital in Qui Nhon, Vietnam as an Operating Room Nurse in 1967. During her time there, Lt. Ramsey was promoted to the Assistant Head Operating Room Nurse and assisted in the 67th EVAC Hospital in Pleiku, Vietnam. She aided in countless surgeries for the causalities that were brought to the hospital, tending to wounds sustained in battle.

After Vietnam, Ms. Ramsey was transferred to the Army Hospital at Fort Belvoir, VA where she worked as a Nurse on the Pediatric Unit before being discharged from the Army in 1968. In 1969, she married her husband, who she met while stationed at Qui Nhon. The two settled in Kansas City, MS, where he completed his OB/GYN residency and she continued to work as an Operating Room Nurse. They would later settle permanently in the Houston, Texas area, were she would continue to work in the Operating Room and assist her husband in his OB/GYN practice.

Ms. Ramsey uses her Oral History Interview to discuss many of the experiences she had during this time of her military career. To learn more about the Oral History Program, please visit our website here: https://bit.ly/2HRsfNM

TOMORROW: Sunday, February 23rd, at 12 PM (noon) our sixth episode of Citizen Soldier: Season 3 airs on WTTW-11! This we...
02/22/2020

TOMORROW: Sunday, February 23rd, at 12 PM (noon) our sixth episode of Citizen Soldier: Season 3 airs on WTTW-11! This week’s episode features a group of American Revolution expert panelists exploring the role of George Washington in creating the citizen soldier tradition as well as his role in the American Revolution.

As we look to the military today, the legacy of the Citizen Soldier ideal is still important and relevant. Washington’s deference to the civilian authority of Congress is reflected in our present-day commitment to civilian control of the military. The colonial militia tradition is reflected in our own National Guard system, in which citizens are called upon to serve their community and country when needed. And we still expect our soldiers to discharge their duty with integrity and a concern for the common good, much in the republican tradition is best exemplified by George Washington.

Gordon Wood is one of the preeminent scholars of the American Revolutionary Era and the Early Republic and is an emeritus member of the board of Directors at the Museum of the American Revolution. He is a winner of the Pulitzer Prize for his 1992 book The Radicalism of the American Revolution. Philip Mead is the Director of Curatorial Affairs and Chief Historian at the Museum of the American Revolution and Scott Stephenson is the President and CEO of the Museum of the American Revolution.

Be sure to tune into WTTW-11 tomorrow at 12 PM (noon) to catch this episode of Citizen Soldier during its first official TV airing!

This weekend with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library: Drop by the Museum & Library for a Saturday Matinee, tune into...
02/21/2020

This weekend with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library: Drop by the Museum & Library for a Saturday Matinee, tune into WTTW for the sixth episode of Citizen Soldier: Season 3, and explore our newest exhibition The Allied Race to Victory!

Saturday means a Saturday Matinee! This Saturday we’ll be showing Spartacus, which tells the story of Spartacus, the slave, as he leads a violent revolt against the decadent Roman Republic. The movie will begin at 12:45pm and will run until just after 4pm.

Sunday, February 23rd, tune into WTTW-11 at 12pm for the sixth episode of Citizen Solider: Season 3! This week’s episode was recorded in 2017 and features a group of Expert panelists on the American Revolution explore the role of George Washington in the American Revolution Throughout the episode, the panel discusses and describes how General George Washington first established the citizen soldier tradition in American military history.

The Allied Race to Victory opened last month, please be sure to come by the Museum & Library and experience the new exhibition! The exhibit focuses on the air, land, and sea actions of the United States Army, Army Air Forces, Marine Corps, and Navy that ended WWII. If you can’t make it in person, be sure to visit our website for the virtual version of the exhibition.

Next week is a big week for the PMML as we will be hosting three separate programs! Dr. Salter joins us for a discussion of the African American Experience in WWII on Wednesday, Dr. Havers will kick off our Mid-Day Muster series on Thursday, and Rear Admiral Nowakowski visits for a discussion Friday. If you haven’t already registered for any of these three programs be sure to check out our website where you can learn more and reserve your ticket!

Saturday Matinee: https://bit.ly/2SMu2d3
This week’s Citizen Soldier: https://bit.ly/32hEb4A
More on The Allied Race to Victory: https://bit.ly/2Tzjkru
Upcoming Events & Tickets: https://bit.ly/37KI17K

#OnThisDay in 1945, following a three day naval bombardment of the island, the Battle of Iwo Jima began as U.S. Marines ...
02/19/2020

#OnThisDay in 1945, following a three day naval bombardment of the island, the Battle of Iwo Jima began as U.S. Marines engaged in combat against the Imperial Army of Japan.

The island of Iwo Jima was essential to the American strategy of taking Japan as it was located almost equidistant from American forces in Guam and the Japanese mainland, with airfields from which to stage attacks on the Japanese mainland. #OnThisDay in 1945 Marines landed on the island beginning what was one of the bloodiest battles of the war in the Pacific. Anticipating the American invasion, Japanese soldiers under the command of Lieutenant General Tadamichi Kuribayashi created over 11 miles of underground tunnels, bunkers, and pillboxes on the island, protecting them from Allied air and naval barrages and enabling them to move largely undetected by the enemy during battle.

The initial 3-day naval bombardment that proceeded had little effect on the underground defenses or the soldiers within, and they waited until the Marines were completely exposed on the beaches before attacking, inflicting severe casualties. American strategy became focused on close combat, often within the tunnels themselves, as Marines sought to gain ground inch by inch. In an effort to inspire U.S. forces on the island and at sea, a squad from the 2nd Battalion, 28th Marine regiment mounted the summit of Mt. Suribachi on February 23rd, and raised the American flag.

To learn more about the Battle of Iwo Jima or the end of World War II, please visit the Allied Race to Victory in person or online here: https://bit.ly/2HBCfKV

In honor of Black History Month, we wanted to highlight Tuskegee Airman and World War II veteran Coleman T. Holt, the na...
02/18/2020

In honor of Black History Month, we wanted to highlight Tuskegee Airman and World War II veteran Coleman T. Holt, the namesake of our renowned Oral History Program.

Far too often, important historical documentation or other information is overlooked or misplaced, making the preservation of veterans' personal stories of service extremely important. For the Pritzker Military Museum & Library, the mismanagement of Coleman T. Holt's service records is symbolic of the significance of the program named in his honor. Despite training with the famed Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, Holt’s name did not appear on any of the relevant roster sheets. The Museum & Library's research staff has worked to set the record straight, ensuring that Holt's military service is properly recognized.

Born in Tennessee in 1922, Holt resided in Davidson County before his enlistment in the U.S. Army during the World War II. His training began at Camp Forrest in Tullahoma, Tennessee—one of the Army's largest and most active bases at the time—and he later joined the U.S. Army Air Corps (USAAC) as a first lieutenant. Holt was accepted for flight training—first at Moton Field and then Tuskegee Army Airfield near Tuskegee, Alabama—and was working his way through the training phases when the war ended. He decided to leave the military to attend law school rather than earn his wings.

Following the war, Holt continued to serve his country as a prominent attorney, leading the push for equality in politics and the local community. He is credited for demanding fair practices by some of Chicago’s most powerful members of the Democratic machine and for remaining firm amidst a race riot in Cicero, Illinois that was triggered when an African-American family tried to move into a predominantly white neighborhood. He was a close associate of Chicago Mayor Harold Washington during the 1980s and continued to pursue social reforms until his death in 1999.

In September 2013, the Museum & Library's Holt Oral History Room was dedicated in Coleman Holt's honor, helping to preserve and share the stories of a diverse group of Citizen Soldiers. Learn more stories of service by visiting this link here: https://bit.ly/2wnkYCJ

This weekend with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library: Listen to our newest podcast, drop by the Museum & Library for...
02/14/2020

This weekend with the Pritzker Military Museum & Library: Listen to our newest podcast, drop by the Museum & Library for a Saturday Matinee, tune into WTTW for the fifth episode of Citizen Soldier: Season 3, and explore our newest exhibition The Allied Race to Victory!

Our production team just released a new podcast that can be found wherever you download your podcasts! This week’s episode features author David Abrutat as he discusses his book Vanguard, which provides an excellent historical account for anyone wanting to understand the Allies military success on D-Day.

The visual taping of that podcast will also air as this week’s episode of Pritzker Military Presents on WTTW-Prime tomorrow (Saturday 2/15) at 9 AM. The episode was recorded in October of 2019 and covers the intelligence machine and covert reconnaissance missions that went into the D-Day planning.

Saturday also means that we’re hosting a Saturday Matinee! This Saturday we’ll be showing Barry Lyndon, which tells the story of an Irish rogue who wins the heart of a rich window and assumes her dead husband’s aristocratic position in 18th-century England. The movie will begin at 1pm and will run until 4pm.

Sunday, February 16th, tune into WTTW-11 at 12pm for the fifth episode of Citizen Solider: Season 3! This week’s episode features Founding President & CEO of the National WWII Museum, Nick Mueller, as well as the later 2018 Pritzker Literature Award Recipient, Dennis Showalter. In the episode, the two sit down and discuss German military history in the twentieth century. If you weren’t attendance at last year’s ON WAR symposium, be sure to tune in this Sunday at 12pm!

The Allied Race to Victory opened last month, please be sure to come by the Museum & Library and experience the new exhibition in its full glory! The exhibit focuses on the air, land, and sea actions of the United States Army, Army Air Forces, Marine Corps, and Navy that ended WWII. If you can’t make it, be sure to visit our website for the virtual version of the exhibition.

Check out the podcast: https://bit.ly/2tuWCG5
This week’s Pritzker Military Presents: https://bit.ly/2HostvB
Saturday Matinee: https://bit.ly/2UQDQUV
This week’s Citizen Soldier: https://bit.ly/2UT0ThS
More on The Allied Race to Victory: https://bit.ly/2Tzjkru

Address

104 S Michigan Ave, Fl 2nd
Chicago, IL
60603

Adams/Wabash CTA elevated Monroe CTA subway

General information

Since opening in 2003, the Pritzker Military Museum & Library has produced over 300 programs including events with award-winning authors, interviews with Medal of Honor recipients, and Emmy-nominated panel discussions on military issues. Programs are presented in front of a live audience, webcast live on the Internet, and recorded for later broadcast on WYCC-TV/Channel 20 and WTTW-TW/Channel 11, PBS affiliates. Programs are also available for download as audio podcasts. Winner of the 2009 National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the Pritzker Military Museum & Library features a collection of books and films on subjects covering the full spectrum of American military history, along with military-themed posters, photographs, medals, uniforms, and other artifacts from private donors and the collection of the Library’s founder, COL (IL) J.N. Pritzker, IL ARNG (Retired).

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 18:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 18:00
Thursday 10:00 - 18:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(312) 374-9333

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