DuSable Museum of African American History

DuSable Museum of African American History DuSable Museum of African American History is the first museum of its type in the country and is the only major independent institution in Chicago established to preserve and interpret the historical experiences and achievements of African Americans.
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TEMPORARILY CLOSED DUE TO COVID-19 The DuSable Museum of African American History gratefully acknowledges the Chicago Park District's generous support of the museum.

Operating as usual

Watch and Share! Black Fine Art Month, Thursday, October 29th, https://dusablemuseum.online/. We are Examining the Black...
10/28/2020

Watch and Share! Black Fine Art Month, Thursday, October 29th, https://dusablemuseum.online/. We are Examining the Black Art Eco System Diane Dinkins-Carr, Chicago. October is Black Fine Art Month.

PigmentIntl.com
09/29/2020

PigmentIntl.com

Black Fine Art Month kicks off with an amazing conversation with the Roux Collective on Thursday October 1 at 5:30 pm CT. Produced by @janicebond the panel features @solesisterart @lovieolivia #rabéaballin and @blackboxpress

Complimentary registrations available at https://blackfineartmonth.eventbritestudio.com/

Thank you to our partners @dusablemuseum and @newdayculture.

Rain Falls From the Lemon Tree, Acrylic, Charcoal, Decorative Papers, Hand Stitching (2020) by @blackboxpress

#pigmentintl #blackartists #blackfineart #blackartexpo # blackartinamerica #art.black #dopeblackart #supportblackart #afropunk #blackartlibrary #blackart365 #blackfineartists #blacklivesmatter #chicagoart #chicagogalleries #blackartlibrary #blackart #chicago #deborahroberts #blackartecosystem #blackfineartmonth

ENOUGH.
09/23/2020

ENOUGH.

Join us on Saturdays and Sundays for socially distanced comedy shows! Tickets in the link belowhttps://www.goshowchi.com
09/18/2020

Join us on Saturdays and Sundays for socially distanced comedy shows! Tickets in the link below

https://www.goshowchi.com

09/02/2020

The DuSable Museum of African American History Presents:The 2020 "Cabin Fever Jazz Series"
featuring

The Clif Wallace Group in tribute to Chicago’s very own Herbie Hancock
Wednesday, September 2, 2020

Roundhouse Plaza - DuSable Museum of African American History

57th Street and South Cottage Grove Avenue, Chicago, IL

Doors Open at 5:30 PM

Show Begins Promptly at 6:00 PM

Tickets - $25 per person/$20 for DuSable Museum Members

Get Tickets Here

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/dusable-museums-cabin-fever-jazz-series-tickets-118562602937?aff=efbeventtix

ADVANCE TICKETS REQUIRED

ABSOLUTELY NO TICKETS WILL BE SOLD ON SITE

FACE MASKS ARE MANDATORY FOR ALL GUESTS

SOCIAL DISTANCING REQUIREMENTS WILL BE IN EFFECT

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO BRING YOUR OWN REFRESHMENTS

On August 20th, 1619, 20 enslaved Africans arrived in Point Comfort, Va. The 400-year journey that followed would change...
08/05/2020

On August 20th, 1619, 20 enslaved Africans arrived in Point Comfort, Va. The 400-year journey that followed would change a nation and the world. From the beginning of American slavery to the Reconstruction, the Great Migration, the Civil Rights Era, and the modern movements for justice, 1619 packs generations of history into a musical theater experience. This dynamic and life-changing musical production commemorates the struggles, recognizes the heroes, and celebrates the American journey towards freedom and equality. Using various musical forms including hip-hop and jazz, this production takes audiences on a journey that illuminates the past while tackling important contemporary issues. 1619 truly has something for everyone!

In conjunction with the DuSable Museum and Chicago's NPR station WBEZ,1619: The Journey of a People will be performed for a streaming audience at 7:30pm, followed by a panel discussion.

08/02/2020

Bronzeville Film Festival Award Ceremony Powered By ComEd

08/01/2020

Impactful talented students! view the Bronzeville Film Festival prescreening video. Includes submitted films from participant students with transcriptions.

Join us for the Awards Ceremony tomorrow, August 2, 2020: Notify me when the Awards Ceremony goes live: http://eepurl.com/g36wPD or view here: https://dusablemuseum.online

ComEd, in partnership with the DuSable Museum and a selection of schools located in and around the Bronzeville community...
07/30/2020

ComEd, in partnership with the DuSable Museum and a selection of schools located in and around the Bronzeville community, challenged students to create a short film that represents the history and resiliency of the historic South Side neighborhood and the potential future impact of climate change on the community, “Community of the past; Community of the future.”

Each group was given access to film equipment, editing software and professional mentoring to help them tell their own unique story about the community of Bronzeville.

Seven films were selected as finalists with student groups representing: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. College Prep High School, De La Salle Institute, Perspectives/IIT Math & Science Academy and Columbia College Chicago.

Two winning projects, one film from a high school student group and one film from a college student group, will have their film sponsored for submission in an international film festival.

07/16/2020
MONEY/POWER

Join the Dusable Museum for a discussion on how to survive and even thrive in these economically tenuous times. Through the sharing of information and ideas, average wage-earners can change their financial positions and alter the trajectory of their entire family's economic potential.

Linocut on paper depicting an older woman visible from her chest to her head. Her face is turned slightly to the right, ...
07/12/2020

Linocut on paper depicting an older woman visible from her chest to her head. Her face is turned slightly to the right, and she gazes in that direction. She has short white hair and wears a wide-brimmed straw hat and a jacket fastened at the front with a safety pin. Print by Elizabeth Catlett.

Slavers also established control through brutal punishments, often carried out in public as a deterrent to others consid...
07/11/2020

Slavers also established control through brutal punishments, often carried out in public as a deterrent to others considering resistance or escape. Iron collars were one humiliating form of discipline. The spiked arms caught on branches and brush, making escape difficult, and also made lying down to rest nearly impossible.

Despite efforts to suppress revolt, thousands of at-sea uprisings were recorded during the legal lifetime of the slave trade, as well as reports of newly arrived Africans fleeing once they reached American soil.

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr. James Scott. Scott is shown smiling with short black hair, a mustache, and a mouche or sma...
07/10/2020

Oil on canvas portrait of Dr. James Scott. Scott is shown smiling with short black hair, a mustache, and a mouche or small beard. He wears circular eyeglasses and a black tuxedo with a white vest, shirt, and bowtie. His left hand holds a decorative paper, possibly a certificate, with text at the top that reads: "MAYOR OF BRONZEVILLE/DR. JAS. SCOTT." The background features a short bookcase, a four-tier glass case, and a nude classical sculpture holding a caduceus staff atop the bookcase. At the painting’s upper left edge, the corner of a framed document with a gold seal hanging on the wall is visible. The “Mayor of Bronzeville” was an unofficial position elected by Chicago’s African American community in the Bronzeville neighborhood beginning in the 1930s. Dr. Scott served as “Mayor” from 1944 to 1945. Born in Mississippi, Scott came to Chicago in 1922 at the age of 27 and attended Chicago Medical College. He began practicing medicine on the South Side in 1929 and later also became an ordained clergyman. Painting by William Edouard Scott

Who are your favorite community leaders past or present? Who is doing the good work in your community and deserves to be lifted up?

Painted plywood sign advertising a free breakfast program organized by the Black Panther Party’s Illinois Chapter. Black...
07/09/2020

Painted plywood sign advertising a free breakfast program organized by the Black Panther Party’s Illinois Chapter. Black and gray lettering appears on a mint green background. A painted black panther is pictured below
center.

Door from the Black Panther Party’s Chicago headquarters, located at 2350 W. Madison Ave. In an October 1969 raid, police used shotguns to blast through the steel door in an ambush that Panther leader Chairman Fred Hampton denounced as an attempt to “throw bad light on the party” during Bobby Seale’s trial for conspiracy.

A Charles White lithograph depicting two men standing in a field, visible from the waist up. Both men are muscular and w...
07/08/2020

A Charles White lithograph depicting two men standing in a field, visible from the waist up. Both men are muscular and wear brimmed hats. The man on the right gazes toward the left and clasps his hands loosely in front of him. The man on the left looks toward the viewer and holds a scythe by its blade with his left hand. In his right hand, he is holding an object against the scythe blade that might be a sharpening tool. In the background are fields and rolling hills; the sky is light but filled with dark swirls.

There is obviously the harvest in mind. What work still needs to be done in our community? What work do you need to do? What are you eagerly waiting for?

Yale University African American Affinity Group
06/25/2020

Yale University African American Affinity Group

Today, the DuSable Museum of African American History will be hosting their third Code Black series titled, "Code Black: Can You Hear Us Now?" which will explore the history of health and healing during crisis.

It seems African Americans have always had to grapple with the complexities of their existence in a society that has refused to acknowledge the wholeness of their humanity and value. Constant struggle against preconceived ideas based on faulty perspectives and often outright untruths can be exhausting. What happens when those struggles get exacerbated by renewed, heavily publicized actions that refresh historical points of injury: police brutality, health disparities, job, housing, and income insecurity? How are we to understand our health and promote healing in times of crisis? Join us for a conversation that will help.

https://dusablemuseum.online/?emci=acf58adb-91b5-ea11-9b05-00155d039e74&emdi=f1ec3844-27b6-ea11-9b05-00155d039e74&ceid=6032630

Address

740 E 56th Pl
Chicago, IL
60637

We’re located near the CTA Red Line, Green Line, and several bus routes. We’re also nearby the 55th-56th-57th station on the Metra Electric Line and South Shore Line. For detailed directions, visit http://www.dusablemuseum.org/visit/directions/

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Tonight at 5:30-7pm! BWOP Chicago-Black Women Organizing for Power's Black Community Budget RoundTable RoundTable discussion about the impact of the city's budget on Black Chicagoans. https://www.facebook.com/events/1127000531028543/
Tonight at 5:30-7pm! BWOP Chicago-Black Women Organizing for Power's Black Community Budget RoundTable RoundTable discussion about the impact of the city's budget on Black Chicagoans. https://www.facebook.com/events/1127000531028543/
just a note concerning BlackHistoryMonth 2020 via; a Black History Maker: when was the last time you read a memoir or a nonfiction history books that'll introduce pride? BOTTOMLINE; We'll have to read them in order to know it and share it with our youth. It’s the only way to enlighten their sense's of ENTITLEMENT. As it does with others ethnic groups, who's taught it at an early age. PS: During slavery days Singing and Dancing and Entertaining the master’s, were means of survivors; for the most part. Like when master say “Boy you better beat your brother’s brains out” we did what master say,,, like it or not. Now day they reward us with MONEY & PRAISE. **************** Many people never wakeup, mostly because they've been taught to believe that they'll get a better life after they're die and gone... While the very one's who telling them is enjoying their's now, ie; the 1%'er and the Richs, but to each their own I say.
Many years ago when I visited there was a display in one of the back rooms about the August 4th celebrations that people used to attend in droves in Moberly, MO. Having been born in Chicago and moving to this small town of Moberly, I was quite surprised to actually see this, as I knew how big those 4th of Aug. (holiday for black people) Emancipation celebrations used to be. Your posters and pics were talking about so many people heading there by train, auto, etc., for the entire weekend. Do you still have that display is my question.
Brooke Greenwood
South side Englewood
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