Oconaluftee Indian Village

Oconaluftee Indian Village The Oconaluftee Indian Village is a 1750's era representation of how the Cherokee lived.
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Once you are at the Village, you will see that it’s more than just a place. It is also a time: 1760. The best way to get there is to un-tether yourself from the world that you know. Turn off your stress. Put your watch in your pocket. Sit under the trees, breathe the pure mountain air, and notice that the only sounds here come from nature. No cars. No blaring TVs. And instead of burnt fossil fuel, the faint tang of wood smoke wafts by on the breeze. Follow it. Embrace it at your own pace. As you step into the Oconaluftee Indian Village, you’re transported back to witness the challenges of Cherokee life at a time of rapid cultural change. This year for the first time, visitors will be able to take self-guided tours to explore the historic events and figures of the 1760's. Visitors can interact with villagers as they participate in their daily activities. The Village also hosts live reenactments, interactive demonstrations, and Hands-On Cherokee Pottery for Kids classes.

It's a great day for ducks at the Historical office!
03/03/2020

It's a great day for ducks at the Historical office!

Cherokee One Feather
03/02/2020

Cherokee One Feather

In recognition of #womenshistorymonth , we highlight the late Beloved Woman Maggie Axe Wachacha. From the Snowbird Community, she was a clerk for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Tribal Council for half a century. A fluent Cherokee speaker who could also read and write the language, she kept the records of Tribal Council meetings for decades. In 1986, she was recognized in the 100 American Heroes listing by Newsweek as well as being given the North Carolina Distinguished Woman Award from then-Governor Jim Martin. She was a noted midwife and herbal healer. Wachacha was given the title of Beloved Woman in 1978 and passed away at the age of 101 in 1993. (Photo courtesy of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian)

Free Winter Lecture Series at Sequoyah Birthplace Museum     The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, located at 576 Highway 360 ...
02/21/2020

Free Winter Lecture Series at Sequoyah Birthplace Museum

The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, located at 576 Highway 360 in Vonore, is the state’s only tribally-owned historical site. It was built to honor the Cherokee Sequoyah, who in 1821 created a Syllabary, or way of reading and writing the Cherokee language.

The Museum is hosting a free lecture series that delves into a variety of Cherokee topics.

Sunday February 23, from 2 to 3 p.m., Dawn Arneach, Interim Director of the Museum of the Cherokee Indian. Dawn will share about Genealogy in general, how to get started, if looking for Cherokee ancestry what resources there are. She has been with the MCI for over 6 years. She started doing genealogy in 2002, while working at the tribe’s newspaper, The Cherokee One Feather. She also does storytelling, she has shared the storytelling stage with her father Lloyd Arneach Sr. at several storytelling venues.

The museum, located on Tellico Lake, features exhibits from various periods of Cherokee occupation in the Tennessee Overhill area. Its gift shop offers for sale many Cherokee and Native American crafts, jewelry, and books on Cherokee history and culture.

These lectures are free and open to the public and are sponsored in part by TN Arts Commission and Sequoyah Birthplace Museum. For more information or in case of inclement weather in both TN and NC check our page and website at www.sequoyahmuseum.org or contact the museum at 423-884-6246.

For more information about the Oconaluftee Indian Village or Unto These Hills please visit: www.cherokeehistorical.org

02/10/2020
Cherokee One Feather

Former Unto These Hills Director, Eddie Swimmer, honored!
http://ow.ly/ZVgL50yijhA

Eddie Swimmer, shown dancing in the video, was honored at the 30th Annual World Hoop Dance Championship at the Heard Museum in Phoenix, AZ on Sunday, Feb. 9. Swimmer, a member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians from the Big Cove Community, won the inaugural contest and was honored on Sunday by former World Champions. (Video by Richard Bird)

http://ow.ly/aq2J50ye9jt
02/07/2020
Native Voices Appoints DeLanna Studi As New Leader

http://ow.ly/aq2J50ye9jt

The Autry announced today the appointment of DeLanna Studi (Cherokee) as the new Co-Artistic Director of Native Voices. As the only Equity theatre company dedicated exclusively to developing and producing new work by Native American artists, Studi's hiring furthers the theatre company's commitment t...

01/29/2020
OsiyoTV

http://ow.ly/QbEm50y61yh

On this episode, meet Cherokee Nation citizen Debra Wheaton who uses horse therapy as a way to help people heal; learn about powwow culture and how it has become a part of Cherokee tradition, and we take a look back at legendary musician Tommy Allsup and his influence on many genres of music.

Sequoyah Birthplace Museum-Basket Weaving ClassJoin us on Saturday, February 22nd at Sequoyah Birthplace Museum for a Ba...
01/22/2020

Sequoyah Birthplace Museum-Basket Weaving Class

Join us on Saturday, February 22nd at Sequoyah Birthplace Museum for a Basket Weaving Class. The cost of the class is $50 a person materials included. Space is limited so call 423-884-6246 to register.

Mary Welch Thompson will be teaching the class. Mary Thompson, and her daughter weave traditional Cherokee baskets, using river cane and natural dyes in their single and double woven baskets and cane mats. The knowledge and skill needed to create the double weave baskets was almost lost. They also weave white oak and honeysuckle baskets, and they use reed splits in some of the baskets as well. The method used to split river cane, strip the outer layer, trim and scrape the split then dye the splits consumes the majority of time involved in weaving a basket. Their prize winning basketry has been juried, exhibited and published in “ALL THINGS CONSIDERED VI” sponsored by the National Basketry Organization & hosted by the Fuller Craft Museum, Boston Mass. All are members of the Qualla Arts and Crafts Mutual, Inc. and Mary has commissioned works at the University of S. Alabama, Mobile.
Sequoyah Birthplace Museum: 576 Hwy. 360, Vonore, (423) 884-6246

Our next stop on the audition trail for "Unto These Hills" is Memphis and Unified Professional Theater Auditions.https:/...
01/20/2020

Our next stop on the audition trail for "Unto These Hills" is Memphis and Unified Professional Theater Auditions.
https://upta.org/

01/16/2020
OsiyoTV

http://ow.ly/VfFe50xU7Ia

On this episode, meet Cherokee Nation citizen Debra Wheaton who uses horse therapy as a way to help people heal; learn about powwow culture and how it has become a part of Cherokee tradition, and we take a look back at legendary musician Tommy Allsup and his influence on many genres of music.

01/15/2020
OsiyoTV

http://ow.ly/gCAR50xU76X

We're celebrating 5 years and this #ThrowbackThursday post reaches way back to our very first episode that featured award-winning artist Roy Boney Jr. The art Roy creates is unexpected, inspiring and often infuses something from Cherokee language and culture.
#Cherokee #OsiyoTV

Here is a great podcast from Duke University about American democracy. The first episode is about Cherokee and tradition...
01/13/2020
Rich Man's Revolt

Here is a great podcast from Duke University about American democracy. The first episode is about Cherokee and traditional Cherokee governance. Some of our own including Davy Arch, Barbara Duncan and Karen George are interviewed.

http://www.sceneonradio.org/rich-mans-revolt/

#sceneonradio

In the American Revolution, the men who revolted were among the wealthiest and most comfortable people in the colonies. What kind of revolution was it, anyway? Was it about a desire to establish democracy—or something else? By producer/host John Biewen with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika

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788 Drama Road
Cherokee, NC
28719

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Comments

Sixty (60) years ago my brother and I (in this photo) visited Oconaluftee Indian Village and had our picture taken with this man. He was very soft-spoken and had a very gentle spirit. I wonder who he was and if he has any living family? Patti