Carmel Clay Historical Society

Carmel Clay Historical Society The Carmel Clay Historical Society collects, preserves, and interprets the history of Carmel and Clay Township. The CCHS fulfills its mission by providing educational services in the following ways: * Public Programs about local topics * Tours of the Monon Railroad Depot Museum * Curriculum materials to schools on local and county history * Historic Home Tours highlighting local architecture and antiques * Providing genealogical assistance to area researchers * Maintaining an archives of letters, diaries, newspapers, documents, and artifacts that pertain to Carmel and Clay Township.
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Operating as usual

FOX59 spoke with our executive director Deb Gangstad about the Holiday Home Tour! You can watch the video in the link be...
12/24/2020
Carmel’s annual holiday, home decor event goes virtual

FOX59 spoke with our executive director Deb Gangstad about the Holiday Home Tour! You can watch the video in the link below.

You can find more information and purchase tickets for the tour here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/24th-annual-carmel-holiday-home-tour-2020-virtual-edition-tickets-128783309345

Thank you FOX59!!

INDIANAPOLIS– For more than 20 years the Carmel Clay historical society has hosted a holiday home tour. Despite the pandemic, the popular event is still happening this year. It’s simply…

Our executive director on FOX 59 news this morning ...
12/24/2020
Carmel’s annual holiday, home decor event goes virtual

Our executive director on FOX 59 news this morning ...

INDIANAPOLIS– For more than 20 years the Carmel Clay historical society has hosted a holiday home tour. Despite the pandemic, the popular event is still happening this year. It’s simply…

There is still time to pick up a copy of our book about Carmel's baseball club before Christmas! And now this week's his...
12/21/2020

There is still time to pick up a copy of our book about Carmel's baseball club before Christmas! And now this week's history post:

In a previous post, we talked about a game the Carmel baseball club played against the Nebraska Indians. The Indian's manager was so impressed that he signed Bales to pitch on the rest of their tour through the Midwest and East Coast.

Bales was a spitball pitcher, and managers were eager to add spitballers to their roster. This was 1906 and that year, Ed Walsh made the spitball famous during the Chicago White Sox’s run to a World Series championship. Bales received offers wherever the Indians traveled.

He ultimately signed with the Indianapolis Browns for the 1907 (that year the Indianapolis Indians changed their name to the Browns). The Browns played in the class A American Association. In the old system, class A was the highest class of minor leagues. The Browns also signed Carmel’s 2nd baseman, Fred Johnson. Johnson was a rare power hitter during the dead-ball era. In 1906, he hit 13 homeruns and 15 triples in about 30 games.

In Bales first appearance for the Browns, he was scheduled to pitch the first three innings against the World Series Champion Chicago White Sox in a preseason game. If he felt the pressure of the moment, he didn’t show it. Only one White Sox player reached first base. The Indianapolis Sun wrote “The curves of Bales were foolers, and the great Altrock, [the White Sox’s pitcher], as effective he was, did not have anything on the man from up the interurban. Bales’s spitter was breaking in all sorts of ways, and Holmes, [the Brown’s catcher], had difficulty in squeezing it.”

After Bales left the mound, the White Sox scored 8 runs and won the game, but Bales had been nearly perfect in his rotation. The attached picture is of Bales (2nd from right) with some of his Indianapolis Browns teammates. We’ll share more stories in the coming weeks. Our book about Bales and the Carmel Baseball Club is available at the Monon Depot.

Our book about the Carmel baseball club (est. 1887) is available tomorrow! Stop by the Monon Depot and pick up a copy!
12/17/2020

Our book about the Carmel baseball club (est. 1887) is available tomorrow! Stop by the Monon Depot and pick up a copy!

This is a picture of Curt Bales (2nd from the right in the back row) with the Nebraska Indians baseball team. The Indian...
12/14/2020

This is a picture of Curt Bales (2nd from the right in the back row) with the Nebraska Indians baseball team. The Indians were a barnstorming team composed of mostly Native American players, who were rarely defeated on the diamond. In 1906, they won 115 out of 131 games! They put on a good show and attracted a big crowd, so teams were excited to take the challenge and see what they could do against them.

On July 6, Carmel accepted the challenge. Over 1,000 fans crowded into the park – that’s twice the town’s population. Carmel’s batters hit the ball deep throughout the game. Team captain Fred Johnson’s home run was a highlight. Johnson was a rare power hitter in the dead-ball era. That season he had 13 homeruns and 15 triples in 30 or so games. Shortstop Pat O’Brien hit a pair of triples off the Indians' pitcher. Carmel also hit four doubles, and it all added up to 4 runs. The star of the game, however, was Carmel’s spitball pitcher, Curt Bales. Bales shut out the Indians. He struck out a quarter of the batters he faced and only allowed four men reach first base with three singles and a walk.

The Indians signed Bales to pitch for them on the rest of their tour through the Midwest and East Coast. He showcased his spitball all over the country and garnered a lot of attention from league managers. That game changed the trajectory of both his career and the team’s season.

We’ll tell you how in upcoming Facebook posts, but if you get impatient or want to read these stories in rich detail, stop by the Monon Depot and pick up our book “Curtis Bales and the Carmel Baseball Club.” It is at the printer now and will be available on Thursday.

Join us for our 24th annual Holiday Home Tour and let the Carmel Clay Historical Society unlock the mystery and beauty t...
12/11/2020
24th Annual Carmel Holiday Home Tour 2020 Virtual Edition

Join us for our 24th annual Holiday Home Tour and let the Carmel Clay Historical Society unlock the mystery and beauty that lies behind the doors of several historic or historically significant homes in Carmel … with a bonus tour of a spectacular southern Indiana home near the Ohio River, owned and decorated by Carmel residents.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/24th-annual-carmel-holiday-home-tour-2020-virtual-edition-tickets-128783309345

Presented in a virtual way, this year’s Holiday Home Tour allows for viewing at a time that is convenient for you. From the warmth of your own home, enjoy the guided tours of one of Carmel’s “Mid-Century Modern” homes, along with other locally significant homes filled with both history and holiday themes.

Purchase your ticket and choose your time and then sit back and enjoy one of the most wonderful holiday traditions in Carmel, the Holiday Home Tour. All proceeds of this event go to support the mission of the Historical Society.

Our tour has been professionally created by award winning video producer, Philip Paluso.

The Holiday Home Tour is online this year! Five beautifully decorated homes including a Mid-Century Modern!

Looking for a gift or stocking stuffer for the sports fan in your life?! Baseball had its roots in the bat and ball game...
12/11/2020

Looking for a gift or stocking stuffer for the sports fan in your life?!

Baseball had its roots in the bat and ball games played on the schoolyards throughout Carmel in the 1850s. In the first game of record, the Carmel baseball club beat Broad Ripple 73-36... in baseball! In the early 1900s, the club was unusually good for such a small town. They played in many championship games and several of the players made it to the minor leagues. This book follows the club and their star spitball pitcher, Curtis Bales, through several seasons of the dead-ball era.

If you would like a copy, stop by the Monon Depot. The books will be available December 17.

The virtual Holiday Home Tour starts on Thursday! Have you purchased your ticket? You can do so here: https://www.eventb...
12/09/2020

The virtual Holiday Home Tour starts on Thursday! Have you purchased your ticket? You can do so here:
https://www.eventbrite.com/.../cchs-2020-holiday-home...

One of our hosts on the home tour has a wonderful collection of antique dolls. Lynette Gross’s collection is so interesting that we created a separate video just to showcase it! You can watch the video here: https://youtu.be/IbJfIpXYons! You can also learn more by visiting Lynette’s website: http://www.rubylane.com/shop/lynettesdollshop.

Our 24th Annual Holiday Home Tour starts on December 10! Have you bought your ticket?! This year's virtual tour features...
12/07/2020
CCHS 2020 Holiday Home Tour - Online Only

Our 24th Annual Holiday Home Tour starts on December 10! Have you bought your ticket?! This year's virtual tour features 5 beautiful homes! Included on the tour is an always popular mid-century modern home and a house that was the location for the first Alcoholics Anonymous meeting! You can order your tickets at the link below!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cchs-2020-holiday-home-tour-online-only-tickets-128783309345

The Holiday Home Tour is online this year! Five beautifully decorated homes including a Mid-Century Modern!

This is the Jacob Kinzer farm ca. 1890. It was located on the north side of Smoky Row east of Carey Road. We posted a st...
12/02/2020

This is the Jacob Kinzer farm ca. 1890. It was located on the north side of Smoky Row east of Carey Road. We posted a story about Jacob's son Everett and his sugar camps last week.

This Giving Tuesday, consider supporting the Carmel Clay Historical Society as we embark on our most ambitious journey y...
11/30/2020

This Giving Tuesday, consider supporting the Carmel Clay Historical Society as we embark on our most ambitious journey yet. CCHS recently received approval for funding from the Clay Township Board for a museum building. The new museum will offer visitors and residents of all ages a place to learn and experience the heritage of our city. In conjunction with the museum and in commemoration of Hamilton County’s bicentennial in 2023, we are writing a book on the history of Carmel. For the past three years, we have poured through previously unknown sources and have made many important discoveries, including the story of the Lenape who settled the area 1810-1832, the history of our one-room schoolhouses, the secrets surrounding the deaths of Constable Frank Carey and Cyclone Johnson, and more.

Help us preserve and share Carmel’s history through these projects. You can learn more about how to give at the link below.

http://www.carmelclayhistory.org/about/ways-to-give

The story goes that Jacob Kinzer told his four grown children that he had money, city property, cleared land, and wooded...
11/24/2020

The story goes that Jacob Kinzer told his four grown children that he had money, city property, cleared land, and wooded land to pass down to them. Everett Kinzer chose the wooded land – 160 acres on the northeast corner of Smoky Row Road and Carey Road. For generations the Kinzers operated a sugar camp in the woods, and Everett carried on the tradition. It was hard work, but sugar season was Everett’s favorite. In order for his business to be successful, he had to protect his 240 maple trees from insects and disease. In doing so, he preserved one of the last sections of old growth forest in Carmel. He was so fond of his trees that he said he’d rather lose or horse or cow than one of his maple trees, and he felt very strongly that every maple tree in the state should be preserved.

It’s hard to imagine that Carmel was once covered in forests, meadows and swamps. Bears, cougars, wolves, otters, and lots of other animals used to call this area home a long time ago.

We would like to express our gratitude for the Indiana Humanities CARES Grant that allowed us to maintain staffing durin...
11/18/2020
Homepage - Indiana Humanities

We would like to express our gratitude for the Indiana Humanities CARES Grant that allowed us to maintain staffing during the pandemic. The grant also allowed us to create our summer exhibit about the history of fashion in Carmel, as well as three Speaker Series presentations and two Making History presentations in conjunction with the exhibit. The grant also supported our fall exhibit about Carmel's railroad history. We were able to publish a book on the history of railroads in Carmel and hold an outdoor event showcasing railroad songs with funding from this grant. CCHS is grateful for this support from Indiana Humanities!
https://indianahumanities.org/

Indiana Humanities connects people, open minds and enriches lives by creating and facilitating programs that encourage Hoosiers to think, read and talk.

A few weeks ago we posted about the gristmill next to the Monon tracks. Let's finish that story! The Foster-Kendall comp...
11/18/2020

A few weeks ago we posted about the gristmill next to the Monon tracks. Let's finish that story! The Foster-Kendall company was formed in 1929, when C. Y. Foster and his son Dallas, seed and grain wholesalers, partnered with Marcus Kendall, a grain elevator operator from Westfield. That year, Foster-Kendall purchased the old gristmill and grain elevator opposite the Monon depot, where they manufactured the Royal brand of seeds and livestock feed. The name of the brand was changed to the Loyal brand around 1947. You can still find the old Foster-Kendall seed and feed bags on eBay every once in a while.

Foster-Kendall built a large brick facility along West Main Street in 1936. Many of you probably remember this building. Anyone who lived in or visited Carmel prior to 2012 will remember the Foster-Kendall grain elevator that was built in 1948. The iconic structure stood one hundred thirty-four feet high, could lift five thousand bushels of grain hourly and had a storage capacity of around seventy-five thousand bushels, making it one of the three largest elevators in the state at time. In 1963, an employee named Barbara Logan had the idea to put a Christmas tree on top of the elevator. You could see the lights of the tree from 2 miles away. The elevator was the tallest building in Carmel until Wren Tower was completed in the Carmel City Center development in 2010. Wren Tower had the elevator beat by four feet. Sadly the elevator was torn down in 2012.

Foster-Kendall continued in business until 1966, when it was purchased by the W. R. Grace Company out of Kansas City, MO. The silos of the large grain elevator remained in use until about 1979.

Anyone who loves local history is going to love this! Thank you All Things Carmel for supporting the CCHS!
11/14/2020

Anyone who loves local history is going to love this! Thank you All Things Carmel for supporting the CCHS!

CAROL SKINNER & THE HISTORY OF CARMEL

We are thrilled to welcome local artist R. Carol Skinner to our store for Meet Me on Main tonight. Stop by from 5-9 p.m. as we dedicate this night to the Carmel Clay Historical Society.

Did you know Carol has sketched some of the most recognizable historic buildings and images in Carmel? We recently acquired all of her original works of history and they are on sale at the store. We also took one of her images and made a beautiful sweatshirt for the history fan in your life!

ALSO TONIGHT - We are promoting the upcoming Holiday Home Tour, one of the biggest annual holiday events of the year in Carmel. It will be virtual, but the Historical Society has some really nice surprises for you this year. We have all the details and will be sharing those as you come into the store, so you don't miss out!

11/11/2020
Gerald Mansbach Interview for Website

This Veterans Day we invite you to spend some time with Gerald Mansbach as we continue our virtual Speaker Series. Mansbach was a tank commander in the Fourth Armored Division, part of Gen. George S. Patton’s Third Army. After holding off the German offensive in the Battle of the Bulge, Mansbach’s division was attacked in a German village. His story about that fateful day and the aftermath is moving and will remind you what it means to be an American. You can watch Mansbach tell his story with the link below. We are grateful for his service as well as that of all our veterans.

https://youtu.be/SpVddF0Odso

Gerald Mansbach, a 95 year old veteran recalls his experiences from World War II.

The End of the MononIn 1971, the troubled Monon Railroad merged with the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (L&N). Three ...
11/04/2020

The End of the Monon
In 1971, the troubled Monon Railroad merged with the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (L&N). Three years later, L&N closed the depot in Carmel along with seventeen others around the state. By 1976, only two trains passed through Carmel a day, one going north and one going south. This decreased to just one round trip per week in 1984. A century after the line was opened, L&N, renamed Seaboard System Railroad, announced plans to abandon the line.

In the final years of the railroad, the Indiana Transportation Museum based in Noblesville ran a train from Carmel to the state fairgrounds during the Indiana State Fair. The Fair Train carried thousands of passengers each summer from 1983 to 1985. Despite the popularity of the Fair Train and the efforts of public officials to save the railroad, Seaboard discontinued service on the line on May 15, 1985. A shortline operator ocalled Indiana Hi-Rail continued to operate the line through May 1986, after which it was finally closed. The Fair Train, which had been parked south of 1st Street SW since the end of the 1985 state fair, was the last train to leave Carmel on July 17, 1986.

10/30/2020
Carmel Historical Tour.mp4

We created a virtual walking tour of Old Town Carmel! Enjoy learning the history behind some familiar sites from the comfort of your own home!

The interurban served more communities in Clay Township than just Carmel. There were also stops at Pleasant Grove/Home P...
10/28/2020

The interurban served more communities in Clay Township than just Carmel. There were also stops at Pleasant Grove/Home Place (106th and College), Mattsville Pike (116th Street) and Gray (146th and Gray). As convenient as the interurban was, it was also dangerous. Streetcars collided with buggies, automobiles and even a young boy on a bike at street crossings over the decades. At least 11 people died and another five were injured from these collisions, but the worst accident that ever occurred was when two streetcars full of passengers collided.

Whereas the Monon was a double set of tracks, the interurban was only a single track, meaning north and southbound cars shared the same track. 17 cars went north and the same number south everyday, so it required precise coordination between cars and the dispatcher. On Friday, June 13, 1919, the dispatcher in Tipton told the northbound car that it would be meeting its counterpart in Noblesville instead of Pleasant Grove, so instead of pulling onto the siding and letting the other car pass. Normally, the block signal would have alerted the crewman of the car that the next “block” of track was occupied, and the northbound car would have remained at Grove Crossing, but a recent storm had damaged the block signals, and the company ordered conductors to disregard them, so the northbound car left Pleasant Grove.

When the motorman spotted the southbound car on a curve in the track just after seven o’clock that evening, he applied the brakes and leaped from the car just before the collision. Two men riding in the baggage compartment saw him run for the side door and jumped from the car as well; one struck a telephone pole. The steel southbound car collapsed like a telescope as it rammed fifteen feet into the smoking compartment of the wooden northbound car, whose sides burst and fell on either side of the track. The collision resulted in 2 deaths and 22 injuries.

If you’d like to learn more about the interurban, stop by the Monon Depot Museum. We have an exhibit about Carmel’s railroads. You can also purchase the book we wrote on the subject. We are almost sold out, so don’t delay!

Address

211 1st St SW
Carmel, IN
46032

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 17:00 - 19:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(317) 846-7117

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Comments

Carmel High School class of 1941 My father and his twin are in this picture. He tried to ID everyone at sometime but I can tell it is not accurate. Possibly the first row and the last row are accurate. For sure my father is Larry Bauer back row 4th from left and his twin Harry Bauer 2nd from end. back row. See if you can id your parents grandparents.
Can anyone tell me if there is a group locally that investigates what were once homes/habitats here in Carmel. I know of one that needs some explaining.Thanks.
The Carmel Clay Historical Society would like to invite you to share your COVID-19 experiences with us. Our society has safeguarded the city of Carmel and Clay Township's histories for many years. We recognize that this is a historic time and would like to take a proactive approach to collecting COVID-19 stories and photographs. Please take part in our COVID-19 collecting initiative by participating in our survey.
Calling all Forest Dale Elementary Alumni! Go Falcons! We are holding our PTO Silent Auciton on February 29th, 2020 this year. We are looking for photos from Forest Dale Alumni to display at our PTO Silent Auction this year. Our theme is "Leap Into the Future". As we "Leap" we thought it would be fun to see images of our past. Photos can be sent digitally to [email protected] and put "Silent Auction Photos" in the subject line. We will be displaying the photos by decade at the Silent Aucition being held at the Woodland Country Club on February 29th, 2020. If you would like to participate in our Online Silent Auction, you can register here https://qtego.net/qlink/forestdale/register to bid on one of over 180 auction items for local businesses here in a variety of categoreis: restaurants: wellness, travel, family activities, adult activities, wine and spirits, and so much more! Also, if you have a local business and you would like to either donate an item for auction or become one of our sponsors for the event, email [email protected] for more information. For sponsors, you can also click here https://www.ccs.k12.in.us/pto-fde/fundraising/silent-auction. Thank you so much for helping us make this event a success! The Forest Dale Elementary PTO Silent Auction Team
I've been doing some family research and discovered Range Line became US 31 to at least the county line to the north. Does anyone know how Range Line got its name?
Just a couple of the wonderful homes on the upcoming Holiday Home Tour! Go to the website to buy tickets ! Please share! carmelclayhistory.org
do you have any more pics with Wilson or Redwine? I love doing ancestry and was excited to see you just post a pic of my grandfather and my mother had a story to go with it! 😀
Ruth and I are looking forward to meeting folks at "Five-Ten" this weekend! Come in and take your ease... :)
I collect bowling pins (some old ones) and came across one branded Mac's with Carmel, IN in the label. I think it has to be from the 1930s or so. Was there a company in Carmel that made these pins?
Best perk of membership ever! The dog and I have been reading the rest of the Ketchum's Town since the mail arrived along with my newsletter and this wonderful booklet. Thanks to Andrew Wright for a wonderful, well documented story. I love knowing more and more about Carmel. If you aren't a Historical Society member, you should be so that you can enjoy this wonderful perk.
I am looking for anyone who has a copy of a recording or pictures from the 📣👠1985/86 school year production of The Wizard of Oz. 🎥 I was a freshman and my mom found the munchkin costume she made me for the musical. I’ve already contacted the present Director of Theatre and Film at the high school and he said he has never even seen anything about that production. Not even pictures. Can someone point me in the right direction, please?