Carmel Clay Historical Society

Carmel Clay Historical Society The Carmel Clay Historical Society collects, preserves, and interprets the history of Carmel and Clay Township. The CCHS fulfills its mission by providing educational services in the following ways:

* Public Programs about local topics
* Tours of the Monon Railroad Depot Museum
* Curriculum materials to schools on local and county history
* Historic Home Tours highlighting local architecture and antiques
* Providing genealogical assistance to area researchers
* Maintaining an archives of letters, diaries, newspapers, documents, and artifacts that pertain to Carmel and Clay Township.

Operating as usual

It’s HOMECOMING WEEK!!! I love this time of year! In honor of this annual tradition, let’s talk about Carmel’s first-eve...
09/22/2021

It’s HOMECOMING WEEK!!! I love this time of year! In honor of this annual tradition, let’s talk about Carmel’s first-ever championship team. In 1902 the county high school teachers association formed an athletic committee to establish rules and procedures for high school sports. In their own words, they wanted “to do away with so much professionalism and make clean athletics among the students.” This sanctioning body predated the IHSAA by a couple years.

Football was the only sport for which county schools fielded teams, so the athletic committee organized a county football league. The teams were Carmel, Westfield and Boxley. Sheridan and Noblesville already had full schedules, so they weren’t a part of it the first year. Carmel beat Westfield twice but lost the championship series to Boxley.

The following year, Carmel opened the season with a 6-5 victory over Lapel. In the second game, Carmel downed Manual Training H.S.’s second team 48-6. Two games later, they got blown out by Sheridan 53-0, but Sheridan had players who did not attend the school and were therefore ineligible to compete in the county league. Carmel went 4-2 on the season and was presented with the county championship banner. This was the first championship, the first award of any kind the school took home.

Professor John Teter was the coach and principal of Carmel High School at the time. He started the first basketball team at CHS that winter. This is a picture of Prof. Teter with the 1902 team. Those things hanging around their necks were nose guards. You can see they have little to no padding. Football was so dangerous back then that the Chicago Tribune published an annual list of football fatalities for decades.

The story of the first football and basketball teams are told in our forthcoming book “Greyhound Legends.” It includes a detailed history of Carmel sports from the early years to early state championships and will be available at the Monon Depot soon!

It’s HOMECOMING WEEK!!! I love this time of year! In honor of this annual tradition, let’s talk about Carmel’s first-ever championship team. In 1902 the county high school teachers association formed an athletic committee to establish rules and procedures for high school sports. In their own words, they wanted “to do away with so much professionalism and make clean athletics among the students.” This sanctioning body predated the IHSAA by a couple years.

Football was the only sport for which county schools fielded teams, so the athletic committee organized a county football league. The teams were Carmel, Westfield and Boxley. Sheridan and Noblesville already had full schedules, so they weren’t a part of it the first year. Carmel beat Westfield twice but lost the championship series to Boxley.

The following year, Carmel opened the season with a 6-5 victory over Lapel. In the second game, Carmel downed Manual Training H.S.’s second team 48-6. Two games later, they got blown out by Sheridan 53-0, but Sheridan had players who did not attend the school and were therefore ineligible to compete in the county league. Carmel went 4-2 on the season and was presented with the county championship banner. This was the first championship, the first award of any kind the school took home.

Professor John Teter was the coach and principal of Carmel High School at the time. He started the first basketball team at CHS that winter. This is a picture of Prof. Teter with the 1902 team. Those things hanging around their necks were nose guards. You can see they have little to no padding. Football was so dangerous back then that the Chicago Tribune published an annual list of football fatalities for decades.

The story of the first football and basketball teams are told in our forthcoming book “Greyhound Legends.” It includes a detailed history of Carmel sports from the early years to early state championships and will be available at the Monon Depot soon!

Our eNewsletter for the 3rd quarter of 2021 is linked below! Inside you'll find an update on our new museum building, de...
09/21/2021

Our eNewsletter for the 3rd quarter of 2021 is linked below! Inside you'll find an update on our new museum building, details about our Annual Meeting and the Holiday Home Tour, information about a new book in our Carmel History Series, and more!

http://www.carmelclayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/CCHS2103_v1.pdf

Our eNewsletter for the 3rd quarter of 2021 is linked below! Inside you'll find an update on our new museum building, details about our Annual Meeting and the Holiday Home Tour, information about a new book in our Carmel History Series, and more!

http://www.carmelclayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/CCHS2103_v1.pdf

In 1822, Silas Moffitt traveled traveled from North Carolina to what is now Carmel with his father-in-law, William Wilki...
09/15/2021

In 1822, Silas Moffitt traveled traveled from North Carolina to what is now Carmel with his father-in-law, William Wilkinson Sr. Each entered land and built a log cabin before returning to NC to pack up their belongings and move their families to their new homes on the frontier. However, Wilkinson died from typhoid fever before he could make it back to Hamilton County. His widow Mary and their children completed the journey with Moffitt’s family, arriving in October of 1823.

In 1827, Moffitt mined a clay deposit on his property and built the brick home in this photo near White River. That same year, his brother-in-law, William Wilkinson Jr., built a brick house near a bluff overlooking Cool Creek. Deer walked across the property after the bricks were set out to harden, and their hoofprints embossed several of the bricks used for the house.

These brick houses were remarkable because at the time, every other person in the entire county with the exception of William Conner lived in a log cabin.

Wilkinson's house was torn down in 1969 during site work for the Brookshire subdivision, but Moffitt's house is still standing. It's the oldest structure in Carmel. You can learn more about this time period in our book "Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel" available at the Monon Depot.

In 1822, Silas Moffitt traveled traveled from North Carolina to what is now Carmel with his father-in-law, William Wilkinson Sr. Each entered land and built a log cabin before returning to NC to pack up their belongings and move their families to their new homes on the frontier. However, Wilkinson died from typhoid fever before he could make it back to Hamilton County. His widow Mary and their children completed the journey with Moffitt’s family, arriving in October of 1823.

In 1827, Moffitt mined a clay deposit on his property and built the brick home in this photo near White River. That same year, his brother-in-law, William Wilkinson Jr., built a brick house near a bluff overlooking Cool Creek. Deer walked across the property after the bricks were set out to harden, and their hoofprints embossed several of the bricks used for the house.

These brick houses were remarkable because at the time, every other person in the entire county with the exception of William Conner lived in a log cabin.

Wilkinson's house was torn down in 1969 during site work for the Brookshire subdivision, but Moffitt's house is still standing. It's the oldest structure in Carmel. You can learn more about this time period in our book "Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel" available at the Monon Depot.

Rue Hinshaw was one of the most influential citizens of Carmel back in the day. As president of the town board, he steer...
09/08/2021

Rue Hinshaw was one of the most influential citizens of Carmel back in the day. As president of the town board, he steered Carmel through the Depression years and focused on improving the town’s utilities and infrastructure. Hinshaw led the effort to establish a municipally owned waterworks plant in 1929 and an expanded the sewer system three years later. He also organized the volunteer fire department and served as its chief. The firetruck was kept in his automotive repair shop, the Carmel Garage, which doubled as the firehouse. Today that building is the Antique Mall on West Main.

Hinshaw also establish the American Legion in Carmel. He was a veteran of World War I during which he spent seven months in France. He was willing to do anything and everything for the betterment of his community, including open his home to his neighbors. In fact, before Our Lady of Mount Carmel was constructed, Hinshaw’s home served as the church and rectory.

Rue was also the town's historian and preserved many stories, records and old newspapers for which we at CCHS are very grateful!

Rue Hinshaw was one of the most influential citizens of Carmel back in the day. As president of the town board, he steered Carmel through the Depression years and focused on improving the town’s utilities and infrastructure. Hinshaw led the effort to establish a municipally owned waterworks plant in 1929 and an expanded the sewer system three years later. He also organized the volunteer fire department and served as its chief. The firetruck was kept in his automotive repair shop, the Carmel Garage, which doubled as the firehouse. Today that building is the Antique Mall on West Main.

Hinshaw also establish the American Legion in Carmel. He was a veteran of World War I during which he spent seven months in France. He was willing to do anything and everything for the betterment of his community, including open his home to his neighbors. In fact, before Our Lady of Mount Carmel was constructed, Hinshaw’s home served as the church and rectory.

Rue was also the town's historian and preserved many stories, records and old newspapers for which we at CCHS are very grateful!

While researching the pioneer history Carmel for our new book, we discovered a previously unknown pioneer cemetery. In 1...
08/25/2021

While researching the pioneer history Carmel for our new book, we discovered a previously unknown pioneer cemetery. In 1847, John Oman sold Joshua Wright 0.1 acres “on the highest eminence near the bluff” overlooking Well Run, a branch of McDuffy Creek, now Spring Mill Run, northeast of 106th Street and Towne Road. The deed mentions that there is a graveyard on the property. Unfortunately, the deed does not give a precise location of the graveyard, but it was likely located either on the 15th hole of Crooked Stick Golf Course or directly across the creek from it.

This graveyard is not marked on any maps or mentioned in any old records. You can learn more about the old cemeteries as well as some previously unknown churches in our book “Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel.” It’s available now at the Monon Depot.

While researching the pioneer history Carmel for our new book, we discovered a previously unknown pioneer cemetery. In 1847, John Oman sold Joshua Wright 0.1 acres “on the highest eminence near the bluff” overlooking Well Run, a branch of McDuffy Creek, now Spring Mill Run, northeast of 106th Street and Towne Road. The deed mentions that there is a graveyard on the property. Unfortunately, the deed does not give a precise location of the graveyard, but it was likely located either on the 15th hole of Crooked Stick Golf Course or directly across the creek from it.

This graveyard is not marked on any maps or mentioned in any old records. You can learn more about the old cemeteries as well as some previously unknown churches in our book “Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel.” It’s available now at the Monon Depot.

In 1832, William and Samuel Rooker built the first gristmill in the township. It was powered by Cool Creek and was locat...
08/18/2021

In 1832, William and Samuel Rooker built the first gristmill in the township. It was powered by Cool Creek and was located a little southeast of White Chapel church. This was a big deal because before then, farmers had to haul their grain on dirt paths to mills in Marion County or Noblesville. In 1836, William petitioned the county to survey and cut a road along the section line near his mill. That road is now 116th Street. The neighborhood that grew around the mill became known as White Chapel, after the White Chapel church was built on what was once Rooker’s land in 1853.

About 1840, William Wilkinson Jr. built a gristmill upstream where Brookshire is today. His mill was on the east side of the Noblesville-Indianapolis County Road. It was a highway of sorts, connecting the area to markets in the state capitol and the county seat. Haverstick Road is a remnant of that old highway, as are Chester Road, LaSalle Road, Cherry Tree Road and others.

Wilkinson replaced his original mill with an impressive three story building with the finest milling machinery available. Like Rooker, he added a sawmill. The mill drew farmers from all over the area. It became a landmark and a gathering spot for the community. John F. Haines wrote about how the mill yard was filled with farmers and their wagons when he visited the mill with his father in the 1860s. Everyone visited and mingled while they waited for their turn. According to Haines, the boys fished in the creek and had canoe races up and down the mill race.

The mill generated so much traffic to the area that in 1860, Matt Richardson built a general store (that’s still standing) at the intersection of 116th Street and the Noblesville-Indianapolis County Road. A village grew around the mill and store. It came to be called Mattsville after the store’s proprietor. In addition to the mill and store, there was a post office (in the store), a barber, blacksmith, cobbler, physician and several farm houses.

Wilkinson sold the mill to James Mendenhall in 1852, and it changed hands several more times. Charles Fritz was the owner when the mill burned down in 1880. The newspaper said it “[lit] up the heavens for miles around.” These two mills were vital to the pioneer communities that grew up around them.

You can learn more about the mills in our new book “Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel.” It’s available now at the Monon Depot.

In 1832, William and Samuel Rooker built the first gristmill in the township. It was powered by Cool Creek and was located a little southeast of White Chapel church. This was a big deal because before then, farmers had to haul their grain on dirt paths to mills in Marion County or Noblesville. In 1836, William petitioned the county to survey and cut a road along the section line near his mill. That road is now 116th Street. The neighborhood that grew around the mill became known as White Chapel, after the White Chapel church was built on what was once Rooker’s land in 1853.

About 1840, William Wilkinson Jr. built a gristmill upstream where Brookshire is today. His mill was on the east side of the Noblesville-Indianapolis County Road. It was a highway of sorts, connecting the area to markets in the state capitol and the county seat. Haverstick Road is a remnant of that old highway, as are Chester Road, LaSalle Road, Cherry Tree Road and others.

Wilkinson replaced his original mill with an impressive three story building with the finest milling machinery available. Like Rooker, he added a sawmill. The mill drew farmers from all over the area. It became a landmark and a gathering spot for the community. John F. Haines wrote about how the mill yard was filled with farmers and their wagons when he visited the mill with his father in the 1860s. Everyone visited and mingled while they waited for their turn. According to Haines, the boys fished in the creek and had canoe races up and down the mill race.

The mill generated so much traffic to the area that in 1860, Matt Richardson built a general store (that’s still standing) at the intersection of 116th Street and the Noblesville-Indianapolis County Road. A village grew around the mill and store. It came to be called Mattsville after the store’s proprietor. In addition to the mill and store, there was a post office (in the store), a barber, blacksmith, cobbler, physician and several farm houses.

Wilkinson sold the mill to James Mendenhall in 1852, and it changed hands several more times. Charles Fritz was the owner when the mill burned down in 1880. The newspaper said it “[lit] up the heavens for miles around.” These two mills were vital to the pioneer communities that grew up around them.

You can learn more about the mills in our new book “Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel.” It’s available now at the Monon Depot.

In 1835, a man from Shelbyville named Joseph Boggs built a general store near the southeast corner of the intersection o...
08/11/2021

In 1835, a man from Shelbyville named Joseph Boggs built a general store near the southeast corner of the intersection of what is now Main Street and Range Line Road. It was located about where Carmel Tattoo is today. The store was made of beech logs and had a clapboard roof. Shortly after Boggs built the store, Range Line Road was cut (before, it was little more than a path that was surveyed and marked) and designated a state road.

Boggs’s store was the only one in the township, and the people who lived around it were thrilled to have a merchant on the west side of White River. After farmers hauled their grain to markets in Lawrenceburg and Cincinnati, they loaded their wagons with goods, such as iron, salt, coffee and shoe leather, to sell to the merchants in Hamilton County. Boggs and subsequent proprietors of the store relied on this supply chain to restock their shelves.

Daniel Warren owned the property on the southwest corner of the intersection. Perhaps the store and the new state road inspired him to plat the town of Bethlehem in 1837. We’ll post the story of the town’s founding next week. You can also find these stories in our new book "Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel" available at the Monon Depot.

Unfortunately, there is no photo of the original store. This photo is of the log cabin built by James G. McShane about 1839 along Range Line Road south of 106th Street.

In 1835, a man from Shelbyville named Joseph Boggs built a general store near the southeast corner of the intersection of what is now Main Street and Range Line Road. It was located about where Carmel Tattoo is today. The store was made of beech logs and had a clapboard roof. Shortly after Boggs built the store, Range Line Road was cut (before, it was little more than a path that was surveyed and marked) and designated a state road.

Boggs’s store was the only one in the township, and the people who lived around it were thrilled to have a merchant on the west side of White River. After farmers hauled their grain to markets in Lawrenceburg and Cincinnati, they loaded their wagons with goods, such as iron, salt, coffee and shoe leather, to sell to the merchants in Hamilton County. Boggs and subsequent proprietors of the store relied on this supply chain to restock their shelves.

Daniel Warren owned the property on the southwest corner of the intersection. Perhaps the store and the new state road inspired him to plat the town of Bethlehem in 1837. We’ll post the story of the town’s founding next week. You can also find these stories in our new book "Bethlehem and the Pioneer Settlements of Carmel" available at the Monon Depot.

Unfortunately, there is no photo of the original store. This photo is of the log cabin built by James G. McShane about 1839 along Range Line Road south of 106th Street.

Address

211 1st St SW
Carmel, IN
46032

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 4pm
Tuesday 10am - 4pm
Wednesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm
5pm - 7pm
Saturday 1pm - 4pm
Sunday 1pm - 4pm

Telephone

(317) 846-7117

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Also Digital Indiana will be scanning my great grandpas photos taken on the old James FHaines / George W Hinshaw farm in early 1900 ( 1908-14 ) Photos taken by George W Hinshaw (1861-1935)
Rescued my Grandpa Hinshaw's diplomas today! 1926 Elementary school 1930 Carmel HS
I am the webmaster for a site that covers the history of the IHSAA State T&F meet. I'm currently trying to locate the grades for all athletes who medaled at the state meet. I've had success at locating most of the Carmel medalists' grades (both boys and girls), but have not been able to find the grades for the following from Carmel...the year in parentheses is the year the athlete medaled at state which is note necessarily the year they graduated). Joseph Roberts, 2nd in 120 yard hurdles (1910) ? Hoskins (first name unknown), 2nd in 120 hurdles (1913) Fred Roeder, 3rd in high jump (1924) It's a long shot being almost 100 years ago and more, but thought I'd see if anyone here might know or have some leads on where to find out (I tried searching for online yearbooks from that era with no luck) Any help is appreciated!
THANK YOU, THANK YOU Carmel Clay Historical Society for the fabulous Virtual Home Tour! We just finished it and were more than impressed! What a wonderful peek into these beautiful homes, and thanks to Don and Lynnette Gross for the extraordinary tour and guidance throughout their weekend home. If you haven't purchased tickets, I HOPE they are available because you will be delighted you are able to take this virtual home tour! (though now my own home is leaving me a bit disappointed)
Carmel High School class of 1941 My father and his twin are in this picture. He tried to ID everyone at sometime but I can tell it is not accurate. Possibly the first row and the last row are accurate. For sure my father is Larry Bauer back row 4th from left and his twin Harry Bauer 2nd from end. back row. See if you can id your parents grandparents.
Can anyone tell me if there is a group locally that investigates what were once homes/habitats here in Carmel. I know of one that needs some explaining.Thanks.
The Carmel Clay Historical Society would like to invite you to share your COVID-19 experiences with us. Our society has safeguarded the city of Carmel and Clay Township's histories for many years. We recognize that this is a historic time and would like to take a proactive approach to collecting COVID-19 stories and photographs. Please take part in our COVID-19 collecting initiative by participating in our survey.
Calling all Forest Dale Elementary Alumni! Go Falcons! We are holding our PTO Silent Auciton on February 29th, 2020 this year. We are looking for photos from Forest Dale Alumni to display at our PTO Silent Auction this year. Our theme is "Leap Into the Future". As we "Leap" we thought it would be fun to see images of our past. Photos can be sent digitally to [email protected] and put "Silent Auction Photos" in the subject line. We will be displaying the photos by decade at the Silent Aucition being held at the Woodland Country Club on February 29th, 2020. If you would like to participate in our Online Silent Auction, you can register here https://qtego.net/qlink/forestdale/register to bid on one of over 180 auction items for local businesses here in a variety of categoreis: restaurants: wellness, travel, family activities, adult activities, wine and spirits, and so much more! Also, if you have a local business and you would like to either donate an item for auction or become one of our sponsors for the event, email [email protected] for more information. For sponsors, you can also click here https://www.ccs.k12.in.us/pto-fde/fundraising/silent-auction. Thank you so much for helping us make this event a success! The Forest Dale Elementary PTO Silent Auction Team
I've been doing some family research and discovered Range Line became US 31 to at least the county line to the north. Does anyone know how Range Line got its name?
Just a couple of the wonderful homes on the upcoming Holiday Home Tour! Go to the website to buy tickets ! Please share! carmelclayhistory.org
do you have any more pics with Wilson or Redwine? I love doing ancestry and was excited to see you just post a pic of my grandfather and my mother had a story to go with it! 😀