Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH)

Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) The Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH), proudly based at RUTGERS-Camden, promot
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The Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) at Rutgers Camden promotes collaboration and innovation in public humanities.

📣 Don’t forget to register for our Fall Historic Preservation Courses! 🍁🍂Our Fall offerings include:▫️Preservation Plann...
08/31/2023

📣 Don’t forget to register for our Fall Historic Preservation Courses!

🍁🍂Our Fall offerings include:
▫️Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)
▫️Cemeteries and Historic Preservation (One-day workshop, Saturday, September 30, 2023, Location to be announced soon)
▫️Back to Basics: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions and Planners (One-day workshop, October 14, 2023, In person at Rutgers University-Camden)
▫️Wood Doors and Shutters Restoration (Half-day workshop, Saturday, November 11, 2023, In person at Ohio House in West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia)
 
⭐️ Follow the link in our Instagram Bio for more information and to register OR copy and paste the following link in your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the half-day workshop Wood Doors and Shut...
08/30/2023

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the half-day workshop Wood Doors and Shutters Restoration
 
▫️Senior staff from the building conservation team at the Fairmount Park Conservancy will share best practices for restoring and maintaining traditional wood doors and shutters. Anatomy of door and shutter components, door weatherization, traditional hardware maintenance and restoration, product recommendations, and how-to demonstrations will be shared from the viewpoint of preservation trades professionals. This workshop is meant to add clarity to the materials and design of traditional , as well as outline the basic process and materials needed for some common repairs. Audience: preservation students, design professionals, HARB members, contractors and old house owners. This workshop will also prove helpful to anyone evaluating restoration contractors for door or shutter repair.
 
👋🏻For more information, follow the link in our Instagram Bio or Copy and Paste the following link into your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/
 
📸Participants learned about preserving historic doors, floors, and trim from Fairmount Park Conservancy staff in December 2019 at the Ohio House in Philadelphia, PA.

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the one-day workshop Back to Basics: A Pr...
08/30/2023

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the one-day workshop Back to Basics: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions and Planners
 
▫️This one-day workshop is open to all preservationists, but specifically geared toward those serving on a local commission. This program is designed to benefit both new and experienced commission members as well as being relevant for planning and zoning board members and elected officials. Focus will be on legal parameters for implementing a commission, conducting an effective public meeting, and understanding and implementing tools to foster good preservation at the local level.
 
👋🏻For more information, follow the link in our Instagram Bio or Copy and Paste the following link into your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/
 
📸 Participants in Cleaning Historic Interiors on a Budget for Beginners, a Spring 2019 workshop that included a collaboration with the Hunterdon County Cultural and Heritage Commission in Flemington, NJ.

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the one-day workshop on Cemeteries and Hi...
08/30/2023

📣Registration is open for MARCH’s Fall Historic Preservation classes including the one-day workshop on Cemeteries and Historic Preservation!
 
▫️Through a combination of classroom instruction and on-site investigation, participants will learn about New Jersey’s cemeteries and their historical context, as well as how to assess a cemetery’s preservation needs and possible treatments. This one-day workshop will take place in Middlesex County, New Jersey (location to be announced soon) and will be led by experts in New Jersey cemetery history, conservation, and ground-penetrating radar (GPR).
 
➡️For more information and to register, follow the link in our Instagram Bio or Copy and Paste the following link into your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

📸 by of Christ Church Burial Ground, Philadelphia, PA

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?  📣 Registration is now open for five Historic Preservation Courses!Intro...
08/23/2023

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?

📣 Registration is now open for five Historic Preservation Courses!
Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5)
Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)
Cemeteries and Historic Preservation (One-day workshop, Saturday, September 30, 2023, Location to be announced soon)
Back to Basics: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions and Planners (One-day workshop, October 14, 2023, In person at Rutgers University-Camden)
Wood Doors and Shutters Restoration (Half-day workshop, Saturday, November 11, 2023, In person at Ohio House in West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia)

⭐️ Copy and paste the following link in your internet browser for more information and to register: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?  📣 Registration is now open for five Historic Preservation Courses!▫️Int...
08/23/2023

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?
 
📣 Registration is now open for five Historic Preservation Courses!
▫️Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5)
▫️Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)
▫️Cemeteries and Historic Preservation (One-day workshop, Saturday, September 30, 2023, Location to be announced soon)
▫️Back to Basics: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions and Planners (One-day workshop, October 14, 2023, In person at Rutgers University-Camden)
▫️Wood Doors and Shutters Restoration (Half-day workshop, Saturday, November 11, 2023, In person at Ohio House in West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia)
 
⭐️ Follow the link in our Instagram Bio for more information and to register OR copy and paste the following link in your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

   ・・・✨ Mark your calendar for a can't-miss exhibition ✨ ⁣⁣⁣This winter, join us at The Met for "The Harlem Renaissance ...
08/23/2023


・・・
✨ Mark your calendar for a can't-miss exhibition ✨ ⁣
⁣⁣
This winter, join us at The Met for "The Harlem Renaissance and Transatlantic Modernism"—the first survey of the subject in New York City since 1987.⁣

Opening February 25, the exhibition establishes the Harlem Renaissance as the first African American–led movement of international modern art—one that is central to our understanding of international modern art and modern life.⁣⁣

It is National Aviation Week! ✈️ ▫️Learn more about commercial aviation in Demian Larry’s essay for the Encyclopedia of ...
08/23/2023

It is National Aviation Week! ✈️

▫️Learn more about commercial aviation in Demian Larry’s essay for the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia titled Airports.

▫️Follow the link in our bio or copy and paste the following link into your internet browser: https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/essays/airports/

📸 Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries

“On June 26, 1945, spectators, public officials, and representatives from Trans World Airlines celebrated the opening of Northeast Philadelphia Airport, where commercial operations first resumed in the Philadelphia region near the end of World War II.”

MARCH is offering more fall workshops! Cemeteries and Historic Preservation One-day workshop, Saturday, September 30, 20...
08/22/2023

MARCH is offering more fall workshops!
 
Cemeteries and Historic Preservation
 
One-day workshop, Saturday, September 30, 2023 | Credit/no credit | .7 CEU
In person in Middlesex County, New Jersey (location to be announced soon).
 
Save the Date: Saturday, October 14, 2023
Back to Basics:
A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions and Planners
One-day workshop | Credit/no credit | .7 CEU
In person at Rutgers University-Camden

Wood Doors and Shutters Restoration
Half-day workshop, Saturday, November 11, 2023 | Credit/no credit | .4 CEU
In person at Ohio House in West Fairmount Park, Philadelphia
For more information, follow the link in our bio titled Historic Preservation at MARCH
Or copy and paste the following link into your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?  📣 Registration is now open for two 10-week courses, Introduction to His...
08/16/2023

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?
 
📣 Registration is now open for two 10-week courses, Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5) and Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)!
 
⭐️ Follow the link in our Instagram Bio for more information and to register OR copy and paste the following link in your internet browser: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

📸Photos are from previous Historic Preservation Workshops.

08/09/2023

📣 Registration is now open for two 10-week courses: Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5) and Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)!

There is no better place to learn the processes and techniques of historic preservation than the living laboratory of Camden and nearby Philadelphia.

The Historic Preservation Continuing Education Program at Rutgers-Camden promotes the importance of historic preservation in communities by bringing together students and active professionals in the field. The program is co-spondsored by MARCH and the New Jersey Historic Trust.

⭐️ Copy and paste the following link in your internet browser for more information: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?  📣 Registration is now open for two 10-week courses, Introduction to His...
08/04/2023

👋🏻 Are you interested in Historic Preservation?
 
📣 Registration is now open for two 10-week courses, Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5) and Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)!
 
⭐️ Follow the link in our Instagram Bio for more information and to register OR copy and paste the following link in your internet browser:
https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

08/02/2023

Historic Preservation at MARCH

Registration is now open for two 10-week courses!

Introduction to Historic Preservation (Online, Tuesdays beginning September 5)
10-week class | credit/no credit | 2 CEUs
Online via Zoom and Canvas (Rutgers course management system)
Instructor: Jennifer L. Boggs


This course is an introduction to the preservation of the built environment, examining the history and philosophy of historic preservation as well as how the discipline is practiced today. It will provide the historic framework of how preservation has emerged as a field of specialization and will expose students to the terminology used by its practitioners. At the end of this course, you should understand,
· the key concepts that have informed and continue to guide modern preservation practice in the United States
· the core programs and terms used in preservation practice;
· that historic preservation is a multi-disciplinary field and the roles that various professions and perspectives play in achieving preservation outcomes;
· how preservation in the United States relates to preservation in other parts of the world.


Preservation Planning (Online, Wednesdays beginning September 13)
10-week class | credit/no credit | 2 CEUs
Online via Zoom and Canvas (Rutgers course management system)
Instructor: Meredith Johnson
This course provides an overview of urban planning as it relates to the preservation field, emphasizing the history of planning, planning processes, land use laws in New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and economic development best practices at the municipal level. Students will learn through lectures, hands-on activities, and at-home assignments. At the end of this course, students should be able to:

· Begin to interpret a zoning notice letter
· Identify land use regulations that affect historic places, structures, or sites
· Understand the impact of historic planning practices
· Attend and understand a meeting held by the local Planning Commission, Zoning Board of Adjustment, or Historic Preservation Commission

Copy and paste the following link in your internet browser for more information and to register:
https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2023-class-and-workshop-offerings/

  ・・・We’re pleased to announce the 2023 NEH Jefferson Lecturer: college president & education reformer Ruth J. Simmons.H...
07/27/2023


・・・
We’re pleased to announce the 2023 NEH Jefferson Lecturer: college president & education reformer Ruth J. Simmons.

Hear Dr. Simmons deliver her lecture, “Facing History to Find a Better Future,” on 9/26 at 7PM EDT.

Civil Rights (LGBT) by Dan Royles In recognition of  , we’re sharing essays published in the Encyclopedia of Greater Phi...
06/27/2023

Civil Rights (LGBT) by Dan Royles
 
In recognition of , we’re sharing essays published in the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia that share the history of the LGBTQI+ community in the region.  
 
▫️In the second half of the twentieth century, a growing number of LGBT Americans claimed political rights as people whose same-sex desire or gender presentation challenged prevailing social mores. As movements for African American, Latino American, and women’s rights gained traction and visibility, so too did movements for LGBT civil rights. LGBT activists in Greater Philadelphia pressed for rights and protections that would signal their inclusion in American society. The landmark case of Obergefell v. Hodges legalized same-sex marriage in 2015. Philadelphians of the LGBT+ community could point to victories at local and state levels but at the same time, Pennsylvania lagged behind New Jersey, Delaware, and other northeastern states in the civil rights afforded to LGBT residents.
 
👋🏻 To learn more about LGBT civil rights in Philadelphia, read Dan Royles essay Civil Rights (LGBT) published on the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia. Follow the link in our bio or copy and paste the following link in your internet browser: https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/essays/civil-rights-lgbt/
 
📸 Photo courtesy of the Philadelphia Gay News
Caption from the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia: Men and women celebrate the passage of a bill that added sexual orientation to the city’s Fair Practices Ordinance, outlawing anti-gay di
scrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations.

Dr. Charlene Mires, Professor of History and Director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-...
06/14/2023

Dr. Charlene Mires, Professor of History and Director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-Camden, will lead a tour of Camden’s Historic Cooper Street on Saturday, June 17, from 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM with the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia.

From the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia: The Cooper Street Historic District and adjacent campus of Rutgers-Camden are a living museum of American urban history. Surviving nineteenth-century residences and later commercial, institutional, and industrial buildings tell the story of Camden’s emergence as an industrial powerhouse and the impacts of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge and urban renewal. Within six blocks, highlights of this walk will include a rare row of 1850s working-class rental properties, the 1869 mansion of Philadelphia advertising pioneer F.W. Ayer, Camden’s first luxury apartment building, the distinctive public art of Johnson Park, and surviving buildings of the RCA-Victor factory complex. We will see residences individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places for their architectural merit and a variety of approaches to preservation and adaptive reuse.

The tour will begin at Fifth and Market Streets in Camden, in Roosevelt Park across the street from the City Hall station of the PATCO High Speedline. The tour will end in the vicinity of Front and Cooper Streets.

Space is limited and advanced registration is required. To register, follow the link in our bio or copy and paste the following link into your internet browser: https://25017.blackbaudhosting.com/25017/Special-Walking-Tour-17Jun2023

Dewey’s Lunch Counter Sit-In by Susan Ferentinos In recognition of  , we’re sharing essays published in the Encyclopedia...
06/14/2023

Dewey’s Lunch Counter Sit-In by Susan Ferentinos
 
In recognition of , we’re sharing essays published in the Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia that share the history of the LGBTQI+ community in the region.  
 

In 1965, protesters at a Dewey’s restaurant lunch counter in Center City Philadelphia demanded access to public accommodations for le***an, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people. Dewey’s Lunch Counter Sit-In was the first known protest of its kind in Philadelphia, and one of the earliest demonstrations of LGBT activism in the United States.
 
👋🏻To learn more about Dewey’s - Lunch Counter Sit-in and LGBT activism? Follow the link in our bio to Susan Ferentinos essay OR copy and paste the following link into your internet browser: https://philadelphiaencyclopedia.org/essays/deweys-lunch-counter-sit-in/

📸 Photo from John J. Wilcox Jr. LGBT Archives at the William Way Community Center.
“On April 25, 1965, protesters staged a sit-in at a Dewey’s restaurant in Center City, demanding access to public accommodations for people. Following the arrest of three teenage protesters, the Janus Society, which campaigned for gay and le***an rights, distributed some 1,500 leaflets over five days before staging a second sit-in on May 2.”
- Caption courtesy of The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia

📣The Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia honored the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities with the...
06/09/2023

📣The Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia honored the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities with the 2023 Preservation Education Award!

📹 Check out the short film shown at the awards ceremony this week at the link in our bio or copy and paste the following link into your internet browser: https://vimeo.com/834120902

Happy Flash🔙 Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street where we feature historic bu...
12/16/2022

Happy Flash🔙 Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street where we feature historic buildings and structures that border Rutgers Camden! This week we’ll turn our attention to 423 Cooper Street. 🏫

🏡423 Cooper Street was the site of a contributing structure of the Cooper Street Historic District, which is listed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places.📝

▫️ Jesse Townsend and his wife, Elizabeth, came to Camden in 1847, two years after they were married at the Byberry Friends Meeting in the rural northern reaches of Philadelphia.
🤵🏻👰🏼

▫️Jesse and Elizabeth had one infant daughter when they purchased the 423 lot.

▫️ Their new house was likely a Greek Revival brick rowhouse like others in the 400 block.

▫️ Their family grew in the 1850s to include five children – four girls and a boy – in addition to Elizabeth Townsend’s mother, Mary Wilson.

▫️ Jesse ascended to cashier of the State Bank of Camden. 🏦

▫️ In 1862, the Townsend family sold the house and moved to 215 Cooper Street to be closer to the bank. The new owners of 423 rented out the house for the next decade.

▫️ Notably, in 1870 the tenants of the house included Richard and Mary Esterbrook, immigrants from England.

▫️ Richard was the founder of Esterbrook Steel Pen Company, founded in Camden in 1858. 🖊

▫️ The house underwent a major renovation by its next owner, Frederick Rex, a bank clerk in his 20s who later became a prominent attorney. ⚖️

▫️ When advertised for sale by its previous owners from Woodbury, the house was described as having “six chambers, and bath room, parlor, dining room and kitchen; water and gas in the house which is in good order.” 📰

▫️ Rex sold the house to the family who also lived there with him, feed and flour dealer Charles C. Reeves, his wife Elizabeth, and their two children.

Happy Flash🔙 Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street where we feature historic bu...
12/09/2022

Happy Flash🔙 Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street where we feature historic buildings and structures that border ! This week we’ll turn our attention to 319 Cooper Street. 🏫
 
🏡 The building at 319 Cooper Street is a landmark of Camden’s industrial history and Cooper Street’s emergence as an educational corridor. Built in 1960, the building was originally the headquarters of Local 103 of the International Union of Electrical Workers, which represented labor at the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). It stands on the former site and side yard of an Italianate rowhouse built in 1867 (a twin of the surviving adjacent structure, 321 Cooper Street).
 
▫️For more than four decades, 319 Cooper Street was home to the Archer family, headed by Benjamin F. and Mary W. Archer.
 
▫️In 1870 their household consisted of Benjamin, then 36 years old; his second wife, Mary, 31; a 12-year-old son from Benjamin’s first marriage, George; and a 1-year-old daughter, Helen. They employed two domestic servants, both Irish immigrants: Rosie MacEntire, 40, and Bridget Rogers, 35.
 
▫️Benjamin was a near-lifelong resident of Camden, born in 1833 to Philadelphia parents who moved to the emerging city across the river when he was an infant. In his early adult years, Benjamin worked as a wholesale grocer in Philadelphia near the riverfront.

▫️He married Kate Starr, daughter of a Camden iron manufacturer, in 1857. His new father-in-law, Jesse W. Starr, took him into the family business: the Camden Iron Works.
 
▫️Benjamin and Kate had one son, George, while they lived in the Starr household in Haddonfield early in their marriage. In 1864, Kate Archer died at the age of 26. Benjamin remained a partner in the Camden Iron Works. In 1856, he remarried. Mary W. Sloan, a schoolteacher prior to their marriage, bore one child before the family moved to 319 Cooper Street—a daughter who died in 1866 at the age of 3 months. The next was Helen, born in the new home in 1869, who survived.  

⭐️Continued in the Comment Section Below⤵️

  ・・・Housing and registration are open for  ! Join us for the nation’s largest gathering of historians in Philadelphia, ...
12/09/2022


・・・
Housing and registration are open for ! Join us for the nation’s largest gathering of historians in Philadelphia, PA, from January 5–8, 2023. December 15 is the last day for preregistration pricing. Visit our website to learn more about registration and hotels, access the program, and more.

👋🏻Happy Flash🔙Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏽‍♀️of Cooper Street where we feature histori...
12/02/2022

👋🏻Happy Flash🔙Friday, Friends! This week, we are resuming our virtual walk🚶🏽‍♀️of Cooper Street where we feature historic buildings and structures that border ! 🏫 This week we’ll turn our attention to 407 Cooper Street.🏡

📚Research by Charlene Mires
📸 Photograph by Jacob Lechner.

⭐️407 Cooper Street is a contributing structure of the Cooper Street Historic District, listed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places, and notable as the home of a nineteenth-century descendant of the Cooper family. 🏘

▫️William B. Cooper was born in 1814 in a house built by his grandparents in Delaware Township. In tradition with his Quaker family, he attended the Newton Friends School and later the Westtown Boarding School in Chester County, PA.

▫️According to an 1886 history of Camden County, the two brothers and their father were “in the days of slavery … devoted friend[s] of the refugee slaves, and would do anything to comfort and protect them.” Research by the Camden County Historical Society has identified the Camden area as “Station A” on the Underground Railroad in New Jersey, and the Coopers’ Stockton Township property afforded an especially conducive location on the Delaware River opposite Petty Island.

▫️In earlier years, however, the extended Cooper family had benefitted from enslaved labor and the slave trade. The Historical Society’s research documented sales of enslaved people at Camden ferry landings, including the Cooper Point ferry that William B. Cooper’s father leased to a Philadelphia operator.

▫️The Cooper connections with slavery took place before William B. Cooper was born, but his life nevertheless entwined with the hierarchies of race that prevailed in the nineteenth century.

⭐️Continued in the comment section below⤵️

   ・・・ : In "A Place in the Pantheon,"  historian Evan Jewell discusses his research and earning the prestigious Rome Pr...
12/02/2022


・・・
: In "A Place in the Pantheon," historian Evan Jewell discusses his research and earning the prestigious Rome Prize. Check out the Spring/Summer 2022 issue of Rutgers University–Camden Magazine.

The Athenæum of Philadelphia presents “The Paradox of Urban Revitalization” with Howard Gillette, Jr. The event will be ...
12/01/2022

The Athenæum of Philadelphia presents “The Paradox of Urban Revitalization” with Howard Gillette, Jr. The event will be held online on Thursday, December 8 from 12pm – 1pm.
Link in our Bio for more information!

☀️Beautiful day
12/01/2022

☀️Beautiful day

  ・・・From CNN: Wendy Woloson, associate professor of history for , discusses how Jell-O was able to "democratize access ...
11/23/2022


・・・
From CNN: Wendy Woloson, associate professor of history for , discusses how Jell-O was able to "democratize access to a dessert" formerly unattainable to the average household. Tap the link in our bio to read more.

📝 For Way🔙Wednesday we are highlighting an artifact that was recovered from excavation⛏ prior to construction 🚧 of Rutge...
11/23/2022

📝 For Way🔙Wednesday we are highlighting an artifact that was recovered from excavation⛏ prior to construction 🚧 of Rutgers-Camden dormitory at 330 Cooper Street in Camden, N.J. 🏫
 
Pictured is a Typewriter Dusting Brush 📇
 
▫️Typewriter manufacturing companies of the early 20th century often paired the machines with a manual cleaning kit, which included two cleaning brushes, an oil can, and a small screwdriver.
 
▫️This “Typewriters Companion” dusting brush, made in France, would have been paired with a shorter, stiff-bristled brush that was used first to remove the hardened grime from between the type keys.
 
▫️The dusting brush was typically used after the type brush to wiping the typewriter clean of loosened dirt and dust without harming it.
 
▫️The handle was originally threaded with horsehair bristles, creating a much softer surface than the wire bristles of its partner, the type brush.
 
▫️With its long, curved handle and its wide set of soft bristles, the Typewriters Companion played a significant role in maintaining typewriters in the early twentieth century.
 
Contributor: McKenna Britton (Graduate Student, American Material Culture, Spring 2018) 📚

👋🏻Are you interested in learning more about this artifact and others that were recovered from excavation? Follow the link in our Bio to the “Learning from Cooper Street” Project!🏡

For this week’s Flash🔙 Friday, we are highlighting 323 Cooper Street! Join us every week on a virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper St...
11/18/2022

For this week’s Flash🔙 Friday, we are highlighting 323 Cooper Street! Join us every week on a virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street, where we feature historic buildings & structures that border ! 🏫

▫️323 Cooper Street is a contributing structure of the Cooper Street Historic District, which is listed on the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places.

▫️The house at 323 Cooper Street reflects transformations on Cooper Street by the 1880s, when architect-designed houses began to appear on the increasingly prestigious thoroughfare.

▫️In contrast to adjacent older brick rowhouses, the stone-front 323 Cooper Street was designed by the Philadelphia firm Hazlehurst & Huckel, who were known for residential, church, and commercial architecture.

▫️The first long-term owners of 323 Cooper Street, John J. and Anna Burleigh, also filled the house with young children. They had five children by the time they moved in, and three more were born during their eight years on Cooper Street – two sons and six daughters. (One other son died at some point prior to 1900.)

▫️When the Burleighs moved to Camden, John Burleigh was a telegraph operator, a skill he had picked up beginning at the age of 14. He gained a position as station and telegraph operator for the West Jersey Railroad Company in Elmer, Anna’s hometown. By the time they began their family life in Camden, Burleigh had advanced to chief telegraph operator for the railroad.

▫️It was an auspicious time to have knack for wires, electricity, and transportation. In the 1870s and early 1880s, Burleigh played a leading role in creating the infrastructure that made Camden a modern, industrial city.

▫️The Burleighs’ purchase of one of the most stylish new homes on Cooper Street in 1890 displayed affluence also achieved in another arena: real estate finance.

▫️While living at 323 Cooper Street, Burleigh’s social circles included the Camden Republican Club, then located across the street at 312 Cooper.

Continued in Comment Section Below⤵️

For this week’s Flash🔙 Friday, we are highlighting 303 Cooper Street! Join us every week on a virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper St...
11/11/2022

For this week’s Flash🔙 Friday, we are highlighting 303 Cooper Street! Join us every week on a virtual walk🚶🏻of Cooper Street, where we feature historic buildings & structures that border ! 🏫

▫️In 1852, a broker named Solomon Stimson acquired the double-width lot at Third & Cooper from a group of investors. In June 1853, the Philadelphia Public Ledger observed him “erecting a large & very tastily arranged dwelling on Cooper Street, which will be an ornament to that rapidly improving section of the city.” Stimson covered the old well with flagstones & ran the water through pipes to serve the new home.

▫️Solomon’s house was double the width of the rowhouses recently constructed on the rest of the block, & reached beyond them in architectural style with features such as its brownstone foundation & hooded windows.

▫️The source of Solomon’s wealth & his reasons for being in Camden are unclear. He came from a rural area of Saratoga County, New York, north of Albany, but by 1850 was in Camden, 30 years old, & heading a household that included his wife Flora (28 years old, also born in New York); a one-year-old son, James; his younger brother John, 25 years old; & two domestic servants who were Irish immigrants, Ann & Bridget McLeod.

▫️The Stimson brothers reported that they were both “brokers,” but brokers of what? It is possible their connections with Camden formed through the lumber industry.

▫️By 1860, Stimson & Carpenter were in business together as Stimson & Carpenter, manufacturers of tape & webbing at Front & Pearl Streets.

▫️A glimpse of the Stimson family’s material possessions emerged from a burglary in 1864, which netted “about $800 worth of plate, jewelry, ornaments &c.,” the Camden Democrat reported. In 1866, the Internal Revenue Service taxed Stimson on possessions that included a carriage, two gold watches, & a piano.

▫️The Stimson family’s reasons for leaving Camden in 1867 are as unclear as their arrival. They returned to Saratoga County, New York, where Solomon Stimson listed his occupation as “lumber.”

Continued in Comment Section Below⤵️

   ・・・  1766, the last colonial governor of New Jersey, William Franklin, signs the charter for Queen's College later re...
11/10/2022


・・・
1766, the last colonial governor of New Jersey, William Franklin, signs the charter for Queen's College later renamed Rutgers University.

📍 Proprietary House, Perth Amboy

The NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project recently received the Trustees’ Award for Organizational Excellence from the Nationa...
11/10/2022

The NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project recently received the Trustees’ Award for Organizational Excellence from the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

Their interactive map (pictured) features almost 400 sites that demonstrate LGBTQ influence on American culture.

Their project aims to broaden knowledge of LGBT history and place that history in a geographical context.

Learn more about the NYC LGBT Historic Sites Project at the link in our bio!

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In partnership with the New Jersey Historical Commission - NJHC, we created a webinar series, "Advancing Your Mission During COVID-19 & Beyond" to be held in May, June, and July 2020. These online events are designed to help cultural nonprofits navigating the COVID-19 pandemic.

Featured speakers for the May 26 "Building an Audience for Accessible Digital Program" webinar were Kirsten Giardi, Interim Assistant Director for Development at the Newark Public Library and Nicole Belolan, Public Historian in Residence and Acting Director at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH).

Captioning for the webinar will be uploaded when available.
Speaker announcement! We are thrilled to partner with the New Jersey Historical Commission - NJHC to present a new webinar series for cultural nonprofits, Advancing Your Mission During COVID-19 & Beyond. Join us on Thursday, May 28, for the first webinar in the series, Building an Audience for Accessible Digital Programs. We are pleased to announce our featured speakers, Kirsten Giardi, Interim Assistant Director for Development at the Newark Public Library and Nicole Belolan, Public Historian in Residence and Acting Director at the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) and PSP scholar. Learn more and register today: https://bit.ly/2WOkPlg.
Since it was built in 1844, the Tomlinson mansion in Stratford has been many things: private home, maternity hospital, and military academy, to name a few. And now it's officially listed on historic registers, thanks to two Rutgers–Camden students and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH).
The Tomlinson mansion in Stratford has been many things since it was built in 1844: private home, maternity hospital, and military academy, to name a few. And now, thanks to extensive research by Rutgers–Camden graduate student Lucy Davis, this three-story Greek Revival home is officially listed on both the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places.

Lucy was supported by Charlene Mires, a professor of history and director of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH), and undergraduate art student Jacob Lechner, whose photographs were used in the application for this official designation.
Thirty years ago, Cooper Street and the Cooper-Grant neighborhood were added to the National Register of Historic Places. Come celebrate this milestone with the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) and the Cooper-Grant Neighborhood Association on Thursday, Oct. 10, 5-8 p.m. in the Campus Center.
The Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) Fall 2019 courses begin in September, and there's still time to register!

Join them for sessions on historic preservation, building care, online resources, re-enactors & interior woodwork.

Learn more and register here: https://preservation.rutgers.edu/fall-2019-offerings/

Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH)
Interested in preserving ’s history? Our partner Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH) opened registration for its fall 2019 courses on historic preservation! http://bit.ly/2MP3KVk
'Explore Philly's Buried Past!, 2018!
Saturday, Oct. 6th, 10am-3:30pm.
National Constitution Center (Kirby Auditorium)
FREE EVENT!!!

Twenty-six researchers will present the latest artifact discoveries and archaeological site research taking place in our area.

This event is co-hosted by the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum and Independence National Historical Park and is Hosted by the National Constitution Center.

See the program schedule of talks and tours here...
The "Philadelphia Archaeological Forum's
Historic Burial Places Map and Database" has launched!

The location of more than 200 historical period burial grounds in Philadelphia can now be viewed in an interactive map - and the GIS data set can be downloaded as a shapefile at http://www.phillyarchaeology.net/paf-activities/burial-places-forum/historic-philadelphia-burial-places-map/

As longtime advocates for those who can no longer speak for themselves, PAF is lobbying for clearer municipal laws that compel developers to handle burial remains respectfully. We have therefore created this extensive geographical database (GIS).

It is PAF’s intention that, in addition to being useful to historians, archaeologists, and other researchers, consulting the database of known cemeteries and private family plots will become a starting point in the process of due diligence of both developers and the city of Philadelphia when considering new projects.

The database, originally the personal research of archaeologist Kimberly Morrell, has been assembled from historic maps, newspapers, academic theses and other sources. Research is ongoing, but the database is the most comprehensive such resource to date.

Learn more about how this resource was made and how to use it at http://www.phillyarchaeology.net/paf-activities/burial-places-forum/historic-philadelphia-burial-places-map/
This ornamental light bulb, dating to early Christmas tree electrification, was discovered by archaeologists in a privy excavated in Marcus Hook.

Learn more about this Christmas artifact at http://www.phillyarchaeology.net/research/research-articles-etc/christmas-lite-bulb-artifact/

Happy Holidays from the Philadelphia Archaeological Forum!
Check out the latest archaeological discoveries from our area!
EXPLORE PHILLY'S BURIED PAST, 2017!
Sat. Oct. 7th 10am-3:30pm
Twenty talks by local archaeologists on local archaeology.
Stop in or Stay All Day! FREE!!
Greetings Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities (MARCH):
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