Morbid Anatomy

Morbid Anatomy Morbid Anatomy: Surveying the Interstices of Art and Medicine, Death and Culture

Operating as usual

Tonight at 7 pm EDT, join us for Dead and Lovely: A Live, Illustrated Online Zoom Lecture by Writer Elizabeth Harper (@e...
09/22/2021

Tonight at 7 pm EDT, join us for Dead and Lovely: A Live, Illustrated Online Zoom Lecture by Writer Elizabeth Harper (@eharperdesign). Click the link in our bio and select EVENTS or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/events to learn more and register.

In this talk, two famous poets, two cemeteries, and two crimes… one man buries his daughter, the other exhumes his lover. Catholicism, Protestantism, sa**sm, and necrophilia collide, illustrating the journey from Neoclassicism to Romanticism with a trail of dead women.

Elizabeth Harper photographs and writes about Catholic relics and other oddities for her blog, All the Saints You Should Know, a project she started to document and demystify the bones and bodies found in Catholic churches. Her work has been featured in Slate, Image Journal, America Magazine, Hazlitt, The LA Review of Books, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the catalogue for Like Life at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her essay The Cult of the Beheaded was a notable selection in Best American Essays. She has lectured at cultural institutions and universities around the world.

Image: A young man weeps in grief by the death bed of a young woman. Line engraving by J. Brown, 1846, after J. Barker via Wellcome Images

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #neoclassical #neoclassicism #romanticism #poetry #history

Tonight at 7 pm EDT, join us for Dead and Lovely: A Live, Illustrated Online Zoom Lecture by Writer Elizabeth Harper (@eharperdesign). Click the link in our bio and select EVENTS or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/events to learn more and register.

In this talk, two famous poets, two cemeteries, and two crimes… one man buries his daughter, the other exhumes his lover. Catholicism, Protestantism, sa**sm, and necrophilia collide, illustrating the journey from Neoclassicism to Romanticism with a trail of dead women.

Elizabeth Harper photographs and writes about Catholic relics and other oddities for her blog, All the Saints You Should Know, a project she started to document and demystify the bones and bodies found in Catholic churches. Her work has been featured in Slate, Image Journal, America Magazine, Hazlitt, The LA Review of Books, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the catalogue for Like Life at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her essay The Cult of the Beheaded was a notable selection in Best American Essays. She has lectured at cultural institutions and universities around the world.

Image: A young man weeps in grief by the death bed of a young woman. Line engraving by J. Brown, 1846, after J. Barker via Wellcome Images

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #neoclassical #neoclassicism #romanticism #poetry #history

Are you curious about the places where art, death and beauty intersect? Interested in learning about other attitudes tow...
09/22/2021

Are you curious about the places where art, death and beauty intersect? Interested in learning about other attitudes toward death, and discovering methods of cultivating a relationship with it? Looking for a creative and imaginative way to face your own fear of death, or to grieve a lost loved one?

If so, join Morbid Anatomy founder @joannaebenstein for her popular live, ONLINE class “Make Your Own Memento Mori: Befriending Death with Art, History and the Imagination" beginning October 6.

Click link in our bio and select CLASSES, or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes, to learn more and register!

In this we class will—via readings, slide lectures, screenings, discussions, art and writing prompts, and guest speakers--explore the fascinating ways death has been imagined, memorialized, and even celebrated. In the process, we will delve into everything from the Eros and Thanatos (S*x and death) to The Danse Macabre, Victorian death themed amusements to the positive death movement, the gothic to Terror Management Theory, Death and the Maiden to the cult of the saints, Santa Muerte to incorrupt corpses, Victorian hair art to Vanitas paintings, objects made using human remains to ancestor veneration.

For our final project, students will create and share our very own memento mori—an object intended to remind one of their death in order to help one live their fuller, richer, less fearful life.

All classes will be recorded and made available to students unable to attend at that time.

All students will also receive a PDF of the teacher’s book Death: A Graveside Companion.

Image: Nu au squelette, Ergy Landau, 1930

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #mementomori #joannaebenstein #morbidart #deathandart #deathandbeauty #arsmoriendi #danceofdeath #deathandthemaiden #victorianmourning #victorianhairart #dansemacabre #s*xanddeath #erosandthanatos

Are you curious about the places where art, death and beauty intersect? Interested in learning about other attitudes toward death, and discovering methods of cultivating a relationship with it? Looking for a creative and imaginative way to face your own fear of death, or to grieve a lost loved one?

If so, join Morbid Anatomy founder @joannaebenstein for her popular live, ONLINE class “Make Your Own Memento Mori: Befriending Death with Art, History and the Imagination" beginning October 6.

Click link in our bio and select CLASSES, or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes, to learn more and register!

In this we class will—via readings, slide lectures, screenings, discussions, art and writing prompts, and guest speakers--explore the fascinating ways death has been imagined, memorialized, and even celebrated. In the process, we will delve into everything from the Eros and Thanatos (S*x and death) to The Danse Macabre, Victorian death themed amusements to the positive death movement, the gothic to Terror Management Theory, Death and the Maiden to the cult of the saints, Santa Muerte to incorrupt corpses, Victorian hair art to Vanitas paintings, objects made using human remains to ancestor veneration.

For our final project, students will create and share our very own memento mori—an object intended to remind one of their death in order to help one live their fuller, richer, less fearful life.

All classes will be recorded and made available to students unable to attend at that time.

All students will also receive a PDF of the teacher’s book Death: A Graveside Companion.

Image: Nu au squelette, Ergy Landau, 1930

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #mementomori #joannaebenstein #morbidart #deathandart #deathandbeauty #arsmoriendi #danceofdeath #deathandthemaiden #victorianmourning #victorianhairart #dansemacabre #s*xanddeath #erosandthanatos

Now available in the Morbid Anatomy Shop, @astihustvedt's Medical Muses tells the fascinating story of three young femal...
09/21/2021

Now available in the Morbid Anatomy Shop, @astihustvedt's Medical Muses tells the fascinating story of three young female hysterics who shaped our early notions of psychology. Tap the image for a shoppable link or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/books to add it to your reading list today!

Then, on November 22, join us Living Dolls: Hysterics, Androids, Animated Corpses and S*x Dolls, a FREE online lecture with the author. Click the link in our bio and select EVENTS or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/events to register.

The fantasy of replacing natural women with new and improved artificial versions has been around ever since Ovid’s Pygmalion fell in love with his “ivory girl.” Masculine knowledge constructs the female body as particularly unhinged, vulnerable to a rupture between its outside, idealized as sublimely beautiful, and its inside, viewed as dark and destructive. This supposed imbalance has led to the desire to fabricate submissive artificial replacements that preserve feminine exteriors but eradicate their threatening interiors: wax figures, automata, statues, anatomical Venuses, female androids and s*x dolls.

The lecture will focus on the interlaced articulations of this fantasy in a decadent novel called The Future Eve by Villiers de l'Isle Adam, and in the actual hysteria ward of Jean-Martin Charcot. In Villiers’ novel, a fictional Thomas Edison creates the perfect woman, an android designed to reflect male desire, while at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, the non-fictional Charcot used hypnosis to create what he called “artificial hysterics,” real patients programmed to become perfect medical specimens. While these 19th century fictionalized and medicalized Galeteas might be thought of as quaint relics of a bygone era, they continue to populate the bizarre cultures of 21st century s*x dolls and AI androids.

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #medicalmuses #psychology #historyofmedicine #anatomicalvenus #android

Now available in the Morbid Anatomy Shop, @astihustvedt's Medical Muses tells the fascinating story of three young female hysterics who shaped our early notions of psychology. Tap the image for a shoppable link or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/books to add it to your reading list today!

Then, on November 22, join us Living Dolls: Hysterics, Androids, Animated Corpses and S*x Dolls, a FREE online lecture with the author. Click the link in our bio and select EVENTS or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/events to register.

The fantasy of replacing natural women with new and improved artificial versions has been around ever since Ovid’s Pygmalion fell in love with his “ivory girl.” Masculine knowledge constructs the female body as particularly unhinged, vulnerable to a rupture between its outside, idealized as sublimely beautiful, and its inside, viewed as dark and destructive. This supposed imbalance has led to the desire to fabricate submissive artificial replacements that preserve feminine exteriors but eradicate their threatening interiors: wax figures, automata, statues, anatomical Venuses, female androids and s*x dolls.

The lecture will focus on the interlaced articulations of this fantasy in a decadent novel called The Future Eve by Villiers de l'Isle Adam, and in the actual hysteria ward of Jean-Martin Charcot. In Villiers’ novel, a fictional Thomas Edison creates the perfect woman, an android designed to reflect male desire, while at the Salpêtrière Hospital in Paris, the non-fictional Charcot used hypnosis to create what he called “artificial hysterics,” real patients programmed to become perfect medical specimens. While these 19th century fictionalized and medicalized Galeteas might be thought of as quaint relics of a bygone era, they continue to populate the bizarre cultures of 21st century s*x dolls and AI androids.

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #medicalmuses #psychology #historyofmedicine #anatomicalvenus #android

Beginning October 16, join us for Be the Wise Navigator of Your Dream World: Discover Your Personal Archetypes and Learn...
09/21/2021

Beginning October 16, join us for Be the Wise Navigator of Your Dream World: Discover Your Personal Archetypes and Learn How to Receive the Gifts of Your Dream Life: A 3-Week Online Class with Educator and Dream Worker Trusty Taylor @revtristy. Click the link in our bio and select CLASSES or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes to learn more and register.

Our dreams are a treasure trove of information, guidance and insight that we are gifted with every single night. Everybody dreams (whether you remember your dreams or not!) and the imagery, feelings, and stories our dreams show us can be harnessed in our waking lives for healing, guidance and transformation.

In this class, educator, dream worker, and interfaith minister Tristy Taylor—daughter of renowned dream worker Jeremy Taylor, co-founder of the International Association for the Study of Dreams—will provide powerful and accessible tools you can use right now to be more present and aware of your dream life. Together, you will learn how dreams communicate, how you can start to track and understand your own personal archetypes, and discover the jewels that can be found in a nightmare. Through practicing the tools you learn in this class, you can become an expert in your own personal dream language, and you may be surprised to discover that through your waking life actions, your dream life will respond, thus creating an authentic “living” conversation with your dream life that will last a lifetime.

Image: The Nightmare, Henry Fuseli, 1781

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #dreams #dreamwork #dreammeanings #nightmare #subconsciousmind

Beginning October 16, join us for Be the Wise Navigator of Your Dream World: Discover Your Personal Archetypes and Learn How to Receive the Gifts of Your Dream Life: A 3-Week Online Class with Educator and Dream Worker Trusty Taylor @revtristy. Click the link in our bio and select CLASSES or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes to learn more and register.

Our dreams are a treasure trove of information, guidance and insight that we are gifted with every single night. Everybody dreams (whether you remember your dreams or not!) and the imagery, feelings, and stories our dreams show us can be harnessed in our waking lives for healing, guidance and transformation.

In this class, educator, dream worker, and interfaith minister Tristy Taylor—daughter of renowned dream worker Jeremy Taylor, co-founder of the International Association for the Study of Dreams—will provide powerful and accessible tools you can use right now to be more present and aware of your dream life. Together, you will learn how dreams communicate, how you can start to track and understand your own personal archetypes, and discover the jewels that can be found in a nightmare. Through practicing the tools you learn in this class, you can become an expert in your own personal dream language, and you may be surprised to discover that through your waking life actions, your dream life will respond, thus creating an authentic “living” conversation with your dream life that will last a lifetime.

Image: The Nightmare, Henry Fuseli, 1781

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #dreams #dreamwork #dreammeanings #nightmare #subconsciousmind

This Wednesday, join us for The Nature of the Beast: The Art of Collecting: A Free, Virtual Panel of Taxidermy and Natur...
09/21/2021

This Wednesday, join us for The Nature of the Beast: The Art of Collecting: A Free, Virtual Panel of Taxidermy and Natural History Collectors.

1pm ET - This event is FREE - RSVP via www.morbidanatomy.org or directly via the link in our bio. Look for the What’s On section in the drop down menu.

This panel—consisting of a number of collectors of taxidermy and natural history—will explore collecting and what it means to individuals.

This program is part of The Nature of the Beast: Meditations on Life, Death, and the Art of Collecting: A new apexart Exhibition Curated by J. D. Powe for Morbid Anatomy

Participants will include the curator of the exhibition, JD Powe, artist Mark Dion, Evan Michelson of TV’s Oddities and the East Village’s iconic Obscura Antiques, and collectors Adam Baschian and Sabrina Hansen. It will be moderated by Morbid Anatomy founder Joanna Ebenstein.

#morbidanatomy #taxidermy #apexart

This Wednesday, join us for The Nature of the Beast: The Art of Collecting: A Free, Virtual Panel of Taxidermy and Natural History Collectors.

1pm ET - This event is FREE - RSVP via www.morbidanatomy.org or directly via the link in our bio. Look for the What’s On section in the drop down menu.

This panel—consisting of a number of collectors of taxidermy and natural history—will explore collecting and what it means to individuals.

This program is part of The Nature of the Beast: Meditations on Life, Death, and the Art of Collecting: A new apexart Exhibition Curated by J. D. Powe for Morbid Anatomy

Participants will include the curator of the exhibition, JD Powe, artist Mark Dion, Evan Michelson of TV’s Oddities and the East Village’s iconic Obscura Antiques, and collectors Adam Baschian and Sabrina Hansen. It will be moderated by Morbid Anatomy founder Joanna Ebenstein.

#morbidanatomy #taxidermy #apexart

⚰️In catacombs, crypts, and bone-pits, readers will find reliquaries, embalmings, and mummies; see somber rites and cust...
09/20/2021

⚰️In catacombs, crypts, and bone-pits, readers will find reliquaries, embalmings, and mummies; see somber rites and customs morph into the celebrations of Halloween and Day of the Dead; and behold the great artistic traditions—Memento Mori, Vanitas, Danse Macabre—juxtaposed with vernacular tokens, found photography, and curios from bygone rituals in exotic lands.

A one-of-a-kind art history, our book "Death: A Graveside Companion" tells, through some of history's most captivating artworks, the story of our quests to understand and come to terms with our own inescapable end. Tap the images for a stoppable link or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/books to purchase your copy, signed by author @joannaebenstein and contributor @laetitia.cartomancy, today!

#morbidanatomy #bookstagram #book #death #collection #cemetery #grave #taphophile #deathpositive #arthistory #artofmourning #mourning #artbook

🎴Beginning October 16, join us for Divining with Oracle Cards: History and Practice, with @robertmplace, creator of the ...
09/20/2021

🎴Beginning October 16, join us for Divining with Oracle Cards: History and Practice, with @robertmplace, creator of the Alchemical Tarot. Click the link in our bio and select CLASSES or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes to learn more and register.

In modern Western culture, the Tarot is the deck of cards most often associated with divination, while playing cards are relegated to merely playing games. This was, however, not always so.

From the early 14th century, when cards were first introduced in Europe, up until the beginning of the 20th century, playing cards were the preferred tool for divination. In the late 18th century, decks were created in which iconic divinatory symbols were associated with each playing card. These oracle cards, as they were called, were designed specifically for divination, and they became the most popular form until the mid 20th century.

Because they contain simple iconic images—such as a key, a house, a ship, a man, or a woman, each with a focused meaning—oracle cards communicate clearly, and their use in divination is regaining popularity. One of the most widely used forms today is the deck of 36 cards known as the Lenormand, named after the most famous diviner of the Napoleonic era, Mlle. Marie Le Normand. But this is not the only variation.

Often these decks were used to predict the future. In this class. Robert Place offers what he believes is a more useful approach. We can use the cards to forecast where we are heading in the future, but the goal is to help us make wise decisions in the present and avoid problems before they happen. We will learn the symbolism of each card, and various ways of laying out the cards to gain the wisdom needed to solve life’s problems.

Image: Tarot de Marseille by N. Conver, 1760 but probably a Camoin (Marseilles) edition of c.1870 from the original woodblocks. Stencil colouring.

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #robertmplace #tarot #tarotreading #tarotclass #tarotreadersofinstagram #oracle #tarotdemarseille

🎴Beginning October 16, join us for Divining with Oracle Cards: History and Practice, with @robertmplace, creator of the Alchemical Tarot. Click the link in our bio and select CLASSES or visit www.morbidanatomy.org/classes to learn more and register.

In modern Western culture, the Tarot is the deck of cards most often associated with divination, while playing cards are relegated to merely playing games. This was, however, not always so.

From the early 14th century, when cards were first introduced in Europe, up until the beginning of the 20th century, playing cards were the preferred tool for divination. In the late 18th century, decks were created in which iconic divinatory symbols were associated with each playing card. These oracle cards, as they were called, were designed specifically for divination, and they became the most popular form until the mid 20th century.

Because they contain simple iconic images—such as a key, a house, a ship, a man, or a woman, each with a focused meaning—oracle cards communicate clearly, and their use in divination is regaining popularity. One of the most widely used forms today is the deck of 36 cards known as the Lenormand, named after the most famous diviner of the Napoleonic era, Mlle. Marie Le Normand. But this is not the only variation.

Often these decks were used to predict the future. In this class. Robert Place offers what he believes is a more useful approach. We can use the cards to forecast where we are heading in the future, but the goal is to help us make wise decisions in the present and avoid problems before they happen. We will learn the symbolism of each card, and various ways of laying out the cards to gain the wisdom needed to solve life’s problems.

Image: Tarot de Marseille by N. Conver, 1760 but probably a Camoin (Marseilles) edition of c.1870 from the original woodblocks. Stencil colouring.

#morbidanatomy #morbidacademy #robertmplace #tarot #tarotreading #tarotclass #tarotreadersofinstagram #oracle #tarotdemarseille

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