The Bradford Landmark Society

The Bradford Landmark Society Founded in 1969, The Bradford Landmark Society is the city’s only historical society. Dedicated to preserving and interpreting the Bradford area’s history, the Society maintains a research facility at its headquarters at 45 East Corydon Street,
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Operating as usual

07/24/2020
COFFEE IWTH THE CURATOR DOWN ON THE FARM

COFFEE IWTH THE CURATOR DOWN ON THE FARM

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The Bradford Landmark Society's cover photo
06/28/2020

The Bradford Landmark Society's cover photo

06/28/2020

Our new Facebook cover photo - the Peanut People, made by local folk artist Daisy Welch, from the 1930s till the 1970s, Want to learn more about these amazing little people, made of peanuts? Check out "Coffee with the Curator" on this page, or the Bradford Area Public Library's page as well.

Trying to figure out how to lose those "Quarantine 15" pounds?  Here's a thought - the new "Slenderizing Machine" at Ken...
06/28/2020

Trying to figure out how to lose those "Quarantine 15" pounds? Here's a thought - the new "Slenderizing Machine" at Ken Lorch's shop at 10-12 Chestnut Street. So simple. All you do is lay there, or sit there and the pounds just melt away. This ad was in the July 1948 City Limits magazine, a locally produced magazine that was in existence from about 1947-`949.

Folks, now this was worth watching!  Two men, Greco-Roman wrestling - on HORSEBACK!  Right downtown Bradford, in the old...
06/26/2020

Folks, now this was worth watching! Two men, Greco-Roman wrestling - on HORSEBACK! Right downtown Bradford, in the old Wagner Opera house, now Moments to Remember store. The old McCrory's store for those of us, who are, shall we say, older?

June 23rd, 1890.

Seriously, they had two horses on stage. Now, THAT'S entertainment!

And ladies, don't worry. You won't be offended. The men are wearing tights.

BE A LANDMARK ANGEL!!!   We need your help!  The Landmark is looking for someone to donate - free - an old lawn tractor ...
06/25/2020

BE A LANDMARK ANGEL!!! We need your help! The Landmark is looking for someone to donate - free - an old lawn tractor for use at the Crook farm gardens. It doesn't have to mow!

We just need something that the garden ladies can hitch a cart to and haul around mulch, soil, plants, flowers, tools, etc. Any brand will do, we just need it to run. And have a hitch, although we could probably get someone to put one on, if needed.

1. It must be in relatively good condition BUT we don't care if it mows grass anymore.

2. It must be donated, free to charge. You could probably get a tax write off.

3. I said lawn tractor, but an old four wheeler would do, or maybe even an old golf cart.

Give us a call at the Landmark if you have any ideas - 362-3906.

That rain not only helped the garden, it make weeds grow.  Earlier today, Mike Fuoco, long time Landmark volunteer, offe...
06/21/2020

That rain not only helped the garden, it make weeds grow. Earlier today, Mike Fuoco, long time Landmark volunteer, offered to weed whip and spray the weeds along side the Herbig Bakery building (our headquarters at 45 E. Corydon Street).

After a couple of months, the Landmark Society at 45 East Corydon Street, the old Herbig bakery and the headquarters of ...
06/12/2020

After a couple of months, the Landmark Society at 45 East Corydon Street, the old Herbig bakery and the headquarters of the Landmark Society, will reopen on FRIDAYS only, from 9AM to 1PM. All visitors are required to wear a mask, and practice social distancing. Please knock on the front door for admittance.

However, if you would like to do research on your house, business, family, event, etc., we will also be available by appointment. Just call 362-3906 and we can make arrangements to meet with you. The same Covid 19 requirements (mask, etc.) will also be enforced.

As usual, all our books are also sold at the Main Street Mercantile store.

The Crook Farm buildings remain closed; however, feel free to walk the grounds and the Tuna Valley Trail, which is located behind the farm, along the Tuna creek.

Regretfully, all our events for the summer have been cancelled, due to the Covid 19 crisis.

06/10/2020
Coffee with the Curator No 1

Coffee with the Curator No 1

Learn about the wonderful items in the collection of the local historic organization, the Bradford Landmark Society.

05/21/2020

I was watching my 2 year old granddaughter 'jumping rope', which consists of her jumping up and down and waving a rope round (so cute, but then I am biased), and I sang her this jump roping song:

Down in the valley where the green grass grows.
there sat Tempie, pretty as a rose.
Along came grammy and kissed her on the cheek,
how many kisses did she get in a week?
1,2 3,4, etc......

My oldest daughter, Cara, swears she never heard this before. Does anyone else have jump rope songs? Jumping rope was one of the best things about recess in old M.J. Ryan School.

How about this one?

My mother and your mother were out hanging clothes.
my mother punched your mother, right in the nose.
What color was the blood?
R E D , P U R P L E, etc.

April 17, 1928.  Workmen have started work for new Regina Elena Society building at 16 Webster Street.   Now the Copy Co...
04/17/2020

April 17, 1928. Workmen have started work for new Regina Elena Society building at 16 Webster Street. Now the Copy Connection.

This photo appeared on "I Grew Up in Bradford" and I thought I'd fill everyone in on Alden Enty.  He and his wife, Belle...
04/15/2020

This photo appeared on "I Grew Up in Bradford" and I thought I'd fill everyone in on Alden Enty. He and his wife, Belle, both deserve a place in Bradford history.

He opened the Turkish Bath at 44 East Corydon Street as early as 1898. Bath Parlors were quite popular - a specialty was a "salt rub", "just as good for well people as sick ones", and said to help rheumatism, nervousness and all skin eruptions." Massages and steam baths were also popular. "Turkish and Russian baths, oil rubs and chiropedic works a specialty." A woman attended to female customers.

During prohibition, a customer died at Enty's Bath Parlor, from consuming bad liquor. In 1924, the Colored Elks of Bradford met in the back of Enty's Bath parlor utilizing it as a club house. In 1933, eleven men were arrested for gambling at the bath house.

His wife, Belle, however, was a founding member of the local NAACP in 1922. They met here, also.

Enty retired in 1942 and died in 1950 at his daughter's home in Baltimore. In 1945, the building was converted to Hollenbeck Funeral Home.

The building still stands, at 44 E. Corydon Street, right across from the Landmark Society. Today it is an apartment house.

Many women are, right now, sewing masks to give to health care workers, to keep them safe from the Covid  19 virus.  Wom...
04/12/2020

Many women are, right now, sewing masks to give to health care workers, to keep them safe from the Covid 19 virus. Women in Bradford have always "stepped up" in time of crisis. A good example can be seen during World War II, when local women were asked to roll bandages for the troops overseas.

Working at the Women's Literary Club on Chautauqua Place, the call went out for volunteers. Here is an except from the Era, dated November 19, 1942.

The big job of making 65,000 surgical dressings for the Armed Forces by January 1 began here Tuesday morning when a group of women volunteers flocked to the Women’s Literary clubhouse in Chautauqua Place. Sacrificing glamour for sanitation, they dispensed with lipstick and nail polish and “dug in.”
Workers clad in everything from Mother Hubbards to Red Cross uniforms, filed into the production room. This room was spotless from ceiling to floor. Work tables were arranged in rows seating six at some and 10 at others. Signs on the walls said: “Wash hands before you begin. No Smoking. Be quiet.”
Here the women assembled, and familiar faces became unfamiliar as white uniforms, white head coverings, white faces, whitewalls melted together in an amazing sameness. At each place were scissors, ruler, gauze, and directions for making the surgical dressing.
The first quota to be filled calls for 9,000 temporary sponges to be used after surgery. These must meet Army specifications or be done again. It was a tedious job but the women went at it spiritedly, shouting back and forth (in spite of the “be quiet” signs.) “This isn’t the way we did it in the last war.”
Maintenance of quiet among 50 women taxed those in charge more than making the dressings.

(The first photo is from McKean, the Governor's County," by Rufus Barrett Stone - his wife Margaret Stone, was one of the founders. The second photo was taken some years ago - this building was demolished within the last few years.

Kudos to our local nurses - and my granddaughter's mother, Tiffany Ott, who is in nursing school herself - who are alway...
04/11/2020

Kudos to our local nurses - and my granddaughter's mother, Tiffany Ott, who is in nursing school herself - who are always there to take care of us. Did you know that Bradford Hospital had a nursing school, once upon a time? Here is the history:

The Bradford School of Nursing

"Palma Non Sini Pulvere"

No Prize Without a Struggle

Those words were chosen by the Bradford Hospital Graduating Class of 1927 as their motto, and proudly written in the Nursing School Yearbook, "The Gusher". Finally completing their training as nurses, the graduating class consisted of six women, Winnifred Sherman, Leatha Hort, Mayfred Burroughs, Rhea Reilley, Blanche Bush, and Josephine Hannon. But they were not the first, nor would they be the last, to earn their nursing caps at the Bradford Hospital.

The School of Nursing began as early as December 1896. It was boasted that it was the earliest of its type in the state of Pennsylvania, and that it was the only nursing school between Buffalo and Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Scranton. The length of the course was two years, and four young women signed on.

Its official name was the "Bradford Hospital Training School", and it existed sixty years. When the program ended in 1956, over six hundred nurses had been graduated, and had earned the privilege of wearing the school's pin. This pin was designed on the lines of a poem by Longfellow, known as "The Lady With the Lamp":

"Lo! In that house of misery
A Lady With a Lamp I see
Pass through the glimmering gloom
And flit from room to room
The lady with the lamp shall stand in the great history of the land,
A noble type of good Heroic womanhood."

The first few classes were quartered in the old hospital, but in 1917 a nurses' quarters was constructed on the site of the first hospital. Constructed with money donated by Sarah Hamsher in honor of her late husband, Lewis Hamsher, the building was designed and built by B.N. Unruh, a prominent and popular Bradford architect.

Admission to the school was simple, provided the young woman passed the physical tests. Vaccinations against common contagious diseases such as diphtheria, scarlet fever, and typhoid fever were also given to the freshmen class. Applicants must be between the ages of eighteen and thirty-five, and unmarried, and students must remain unmarried during the time they attended school.

The freshmen year was devoted to theoretical and practical instruction in the nursing care of the sick. The class schedule was arranged on an eight-hour day; classroom work, one hour of supervised ward work, and study periods. Classes covered anatomy, chemistry, nutrition and cooking, the history of nursing, microbiology, massage, and other basic skills.

The next term, the student was assigned to various departments in the hospital, given lectures and clinical instruction, and was given the opportunity to observe the patients and practice various nursing procedures.

Classes included those on diseases, orthopedics, operating room techniques, pathology, sociology, tuberculosis, case study, and ward practice. The second year, the students learned gynecology, obstetrics, pediatrics, communicable diseases, dermatology, and more ward practice. The third year was a continuation in all of the above, as well as a three-month stint in the Warren State Hospital for experience in psychiatry. Upon satisfactory completion of all class work, the student was "pinned" and received her nursing cap.

In 1956 the Bradford Hospital School of Nursing closed with the graduation of the "Class of '56". The closing was due to inadequate state support for educational training within hospitals. Over 600 nurses graduated from the school of nursing during its existence.

These photos show student nurses. The Landmark has dozens of student nurse photos, as well as several of the yearbook that the Nursing School had each year, "The Gusher."

Today is Good Friday, and while its a religous holiday, its also the anniversary of a flood in the city.  its not the ex...
04/10/2020

Today is Good Friday, and while its a religous holiday, its also the anniversary of a flood in the city. its not the exact date (that was April 5 , 1947), but it WAS a Good Friday when Bradford had its last, great flood. Here are some photos from that day.

It was a terrible flood - cold water, high water - and these photos are legendary. A report was compiled, a few days later, with letters from affected businesses, flood photos, photos of debris, etc. was issued to the Army Corp of Engineers, in a bound book. The Landmark has a copy of that report and its very detailed, as the city clamored for flood control.

Eventually, in the 1950s, flood control was begun and today, flood such as this magnitude are a thing of the past.

04/06/2020

There are several women in Bradford, right now, making masks for the hospital and nursing homes, to help fight the Covid 19 Corona Virus.

It brought to mind the women of Bradford during World War II, when many of them volunteered to wrap bandages for the war.

The Bradford Landmark Society's cover photo
04/05/2020

The Bradford Landmark Society's cover photo

04/05/2020

okay, over on our 'sister' page, I Grew Up In Bradford, there is a post going about the population in Bradford. Well, I found this article in the Era in 1943.

The population of Bradford has not declined sharply despite the large number of men and women who have left for the armed forces or have moved to defense work centers throughout the country, if the figures in last week’s registration for War Ration Book No. 2 reflect faithfully the numbers of persons now living here.
Teachers in the Bradford public schools last week issued ration books for 16,987 persons, a figure which, it is assumed, represents the city’s present population. The 1940 census gave the population here as 17,691. This indicates that World War II has resulted in a drop of slightly more than 700 in three years. The 1930 census figure was 19,306.

Hey, folks, I know that everyone is home now, reading the Landmark's page but don't forget to fill out your 202...
03/28/2020

Hey, folks, I know that everyone is home now, reading the Landmark's page but don't forget to fill out your 2020 census - its REALLY simple, and takes about 30 seconds.

And if you are doing family history and interested in genealogy, the census is probably the first place you would look to find out information.

Now, before you grumble about your right to privacy being invaded and complain that the government has no right to ask any personal questions, uh, yes it does. Have the right that is. Its in the Constitution! Here is what it says:

"Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States... according to their respective Numbers... . The actual Enumeration shall be made within three years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years"

This year is the 24th Census.

The first census was in 1790 and asked questions on gender, race, relationship to the head of the household, name of the head of the household, and the number of slaves, if any. That census included the 13 original colonies, plus the districts of Kentucky, Maine and Vermont, and the Southwest Territory of Tennessee. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson was the supervisor of Census Day, August 2, 1790.

As many of you know, a fire in Washington, DC in 1921 destroyed what would have been one of the most important census records - that of 1890. More on that later.

03/26/2020

Here’s a strange story from Olean, during 1897. It seems that a man was found wandering around that city in the fall of 1896, didn’t know who he was, but had vague memories of being in a Chicago hospital. It was said that he seemed to be a very intelligent man, and was taken in by Olean’s police chief, and given a place to live. The man thought his name might be Charles Brown, but had no idea how he had come to be in Olean.

Months passed, and the new Charles Brown settled down in Olean, began a small business in real estate and things were going great until he fell asleep on a Thursday night in March 1897, slept until Saturday, and when he woke up was surprised to be in Olean, NY, and wondered where his wife, Alice, was. He distinctly remembered his previous life but had no memory of being Charles Brown, or his life in Olean.

He also thought he was in a Chicago hospital.

Well, the story gets even stranger. Mr. Brown said that his real name was David J. Telfair, and that he was, in reality, a South African diamond dealer - heck, a
millionaire - and remembered returning to this country, only to be accosted by three men on a street in Chicago, and being hit on the back of the head.
Once he came to, on that Saturday night in Olean, he immediately felt for his belt - inside, he declared, were 103 diamonds. No belt, of course, had been found with him months earlier. He also said that his company had over $6,000,000 in British money in a NY City safe deposit.

He was shown a mirror and was surprised to see that his beard was completely white - “it should be black” he stated. In July 1897 the police chief of Olean received a letter from the Secretary of State in Pretoria, South Africa, written in the “Boor” language. Turns out that the Cattaraugus County judge, Judge Kruse, could read German, and was able to translate part of the letter. Which verified, that a man named David J. Telfair, had been involved with a mining operation near Johannesburg, had been imprisoned, but had escaped. They sent the rest of the letter to St. Bonaventure to have the rest translated, but Police Chief Hart said he believed the story 100%.

So, what happened? Well, David Telfair next founded the Telfair Mining Company, which purported to get gold from the ground by sending an electric current through it and gave lectures on the subject to local audiences.

Telfair left Olean after a year, and the last report of him found him in Georgia, in a coma, after a suicide attempt with poison in 1899. Still, ancestry records find him dying in Georgia in 1915.

Address

45 E Corydon St
Bradford, PA
16701

General information

The Herbig Bakery is open to the public Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 11am to 2pm.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(814) 362-3906

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Comments

I've been working on a video the past few years about Bradford and the Allegheny region. I would like to interview someone on the cities history as well as the surrounding area. If anyone can help, shoot me a message and let me know. Thanks :)
My grandmother, Adelaide Clark was born in Bradford, in 1902, at 13 Buffalo St. she told me that it was the last house on that road at the time. I’m not sure if this was the house they lived in but I remember her telling me it was looking up onto Buffalo St. She moved from there somewhere around 1915, after her father died.
Does anyone have any history on Bradford Dairies?
We found this old framed photo in a building on Main St. in Bradford. This man has a Mason pin on. Any idea who he is?
An old glass negative I found.
Frank Foster (yes as on Foster Brook) at Hanley brick yard mid ,30's
Does anyone have any pictures of tops where it used to sit in same parking lot?
I was looking at the Bradford Era photo of the recent water main break on Washington Street near Dexter's over the weekend, and noticed behind the workers feet what look like railroad ties? If it is, they are running perpendicular to Washington street. The only railroad crossing I know of was up by the Library, and up towards Pitt field at the 'Chemical switch' where the A&K peeled off the Erie. Maybe a siding?
Sally Costik ~ thanks for the book. I’ll mail out a check this coming week.
Do you have any pics of the old Producers bank? I believe it was at the corner of Main & Chambers St.
We are visiting from Maryland and would like to buy the millionaires book. When are you open?
Has anyone a photo of 'Anderson's Diner' at the B&O Station area? It was an annual event for our family to travel through Bradford in the 50's & 60's and stop there for lunch as it was half-way from Buffalo to DuBois, where my Grandmother's family was from.