War Horse Museum

War Horse Museum World's Finest Collection of Military Saddles

New post (Civil War Cavalry Tactics) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
Civil War Cavalry Tactics

New post (Civil War Cavalry Tactics) has been published on War Horse Museum

As the Civil War progressed, tactical differences in the mission of Cavalry began to emerge. The South used Cavalry more extensively than the North for reconnaissance and raids deep into enemy territory. That was evidenced by Jeb Stuart’s ride around the Union Army, Morgan’s deep penetration into eastern Ohio, Shelby’s raid through Union held territory in Missouri and the movement of Prices’ Cavalry from Arkansas, through Missouri and back to Texas. The Union tended to use horses more for expedient troop movement to the battle lines and fighting dismounted when tactics dictated.
J. Mark Alley 2/28/13

New post (DRAGOON UNITS GROW DEMANDS OF THE WAR WITH MEXICO) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
DRAGOON UNITS GROW DEMANDS OF THE WAR WITH MEXICO

New post (DRAGOON UNITS GROW DEMANDS OF THE WAR WITH MEXICO) has been published on War Horse Museum


Disputes with Mexico over territorial control in California and Texas saw the U.S. drifting toward war in the late 1840’s. Many Dragoon regiments were outfitted with newly designed Ringgold and Grimsley horse gear. Thousands of mounted Dragoons headed down the trails toward battlefields in Mexico to settle issues unresolved in political arenas.
J. Mark Alley 2/28/13

New post (Anatomy of the US Cavalry) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
Anatomy of the US Cavalry

New post (Anatomy of the US Cavalry) has been published on War Horse Museum



From the desk of: J. Mark Alley
BLOG Post: # 3
Randy Steffen, in his masterful book published in 1973, tells us that in all his intensive research he found no government orders or contracts predating the May 9, 1812 contract for 200 sets of horse equipments to be made by James Walker, a Philadelphia saddle maker. The contract issued on behalf of the U.S. Government by agent Tench Coxe, purveyor of public supplies called for complete sets of horse equipments consisting of the following: trooper’s saddle outfitted with iron stirrups, iron rings and staples for attaching equipment; leather breast plate; valise pad complete with straps and valise; leather halter; double bit bridle; pair of holsters with bearskin covers and a leather surcingle. Implicit in the contract were two worsted web girths (double rigged girthing system) and a leather crupper which was an option ...

New post (Wagon's Hoooo!) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
Wagon's Hoooo!

New post (Wagon's Hoooo!) has been published on War Horse Museum


From the desk of:
J. Mark Alley

BLOG POST: # 2

We can dismiss military harness without much attention for two reasons. First, as the Colonial Army was formed, military harness served in two categories – freight hauling and pulling artillery pieces. Freight wagons were often drawn by ox teams as opposed to horse and mule teams. Three or more teams of oxen, paired together by a hand hewn ox yoke and linked by a common chain hooked to the freight wagon were driven by a driver who walked near the wheel team carrying a bull whip that reached any animal among the teams. Although unwieldy, the oxen pulled together, goaded by the driver’s whip and with reliability ...

New post (All Aboard...) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
All Aboard...

New post (All Aboard...) has been published on War Horse Museum

From the desk of: J. Mark Alley
Blogs will appear intermittently on these pages to inform you about the very important role saddles have played in history and particularly in the Horse Soldier era of U.S. and Confederate military histor
The Smithsonian holds some of the most valuable saddles in U.S. military history, ones used by famous Horse Soldiers dating back to Pr­e-revolutionary days. The astute saddle scholar would be well advised to visit the Smithsonian Collection to see the best of the best.
Another worthy visit would be to the West Point Academy Museum to view their comprehensive collection that provides a walk through history’s lanes that have been visited by most of the famous U.S. military officers whose names are legendary in the annals of America’s colorful past.
Finally in the Central States, the World War 1 Museum in Kansas City, Mo., the Ft. ...

New post (Collection Adoption Offering) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
Collection Adoption Offering

New post (Collection Adoption Offering) has been published on War Horse Museum


THREE OF THE COOLEST THINGS I’VE NOTICED
First, April 18, 2013 in the Kansas City area with a wind chill factor of 26 degrees; second, having lived 81 ½ years and still waking up in the morning excited about what the day has in store for me; third, having experienced the incredible journey of following the illustrious trail forged through the landscape of American history by mounted horsemen, both civilian and military.
Such names as Morgan, Mosby, Custer, Kilpatrick, Shelby and Jeb Stuart are etched forever on the hallowed fields of conflict, but the courage and devotion of the unremembered legions who rode, sweated and died in their support are the unsung heroes of my journey. Yes, there is a place for the Custers and Shelbys in the annals of history, but one must remember that their careers were validated by the plain and true men who rode ignominiously in their shadows. ...

New post (Collection Adoption Offering ) has been published on War Horse Museum
09/10/2013
Collection Adoption Offering

New post (Collection Adoption Offering ) has been published on War Horse Museum


First, April 18, 2013 in the Kansas City area with a wind chill factor of 26 degrees; second, having lived 81 ½ years and still waking up in the morning excited about what the day has in store for me; third, having experienced the incredible journey of following the illustrious trail forged through the landscape of American history by mounted horsemen, both civilian and military.

Such names as Morgan, Mosby, Custer, Kilpatrick, Shelby and Jeb Stuart are etched forever on the hallowed fields of conflict, but the courage and devotion of the unremembered legions who rode, sweated and died in their support are the unsung heroes of my journey. Yes, there is a place for the Custers and Shelbys in the annals of history, but one must remember that their careers were validated by the plain and true men who rode ignominiously in their shadows. To these men, I vowed to honor and salute ...

New post (Civil War Cavalry Tactics) has been published on War Horse Museum
08/25/2013
Civil War Cavalry Tactics

New post (Civil War Cavalry Tactics) has been published on War Horse Museum

As the Civil War progressed, tactical differences in the mission of Cavalry began to emerge. The South used Cavalry more extensively than the North for reconnaissance and raids deep into enemy territory. That was evidenced by Jeb Stuart’s ride around the Union Army, Morgan’s deep penetration into eastern Ohio, Shelby’s raid through Union held territory in Missouri and the movement of Prices’ Cavalry from Arkansas, through Missouri and back to Texas. The Union tended to use horses more for expedient troop movement to the battle lines and fighting dismounted when tactics dictated.
J. Mark Alley 2/28/13

New post (Wagon's Hoooo!) has been published on War Horse Museum
08/19/2013
Wagon's Hoooo!

New post (Wagon's Hoooo!) has been published on War Horse Museum


From the desk of:
J. Mark Alley

BLOG POST: # 2

We can dismiss military harness without much attention for two reasons. First, as the Colonial Army was formed, military harness served in two categories – freight hauling and pulling artillery pieces. Freight wagons were often drawn by ox teams as opposed to horse and mule teams. Three or more teams of oxen, paired together by a hand hewn ox yoke and linked by a common chain hooked to the freight wagon were driven by a driver who walked near the wheel team carrying a bull whip that reached any animal among the teams. Although unwieldy, the oxen pulled together, goaded by the driver’s whip and with reliability ...

New post (All Aboard...) has been published on War Horse Museum
08/19/2013
All Aboard...

New post (All Aboard...) has been published on War Horse Museum

From the desk of: J. Mark Alley
Blogs will appear intermittently on these pages to inform you about the very important role saddles have played in history and particularly in the Horse Soldier era of U.S. and Confederate military histor
The Smithsonian holds some of the most valuable saddles in U.S. military history, ones used by famous Horse Soldiers dating back to Pr­e-revolutionary days. The astute saddle scholar would be well advised to visit the Smithsonian Collection to see the best of the best.
Another worthy visit would be to the West Point Academy Museum to view their comprehensive collection that provides a walk through history’s lanes that have been visited by most of the famous U.S. military officers whose names are legendary in the annals of America’s colorful past.
Finally in the Central States, the World War 1 Museum in Kansas City, Mo., the Ft. ...

New post (Collection Adoption Offering) has been published on War Horse Museum
08/19/2013
Collection Adoption Offering

New post (Collection Adoption Offering) has been published on War Horse Museum


THREE OF THE COOLEST THINGS I’VE NOTICED
First, April 18, 2013 in the Kansas City area with a wind chill factor of 26 degrees; second, having lived 81 ½ years and still waking up in the morning excited about what the day has in store for me; third, having experienced the incredible journey of following the illustrious trail forged through the landscape of American history by mounted horsemen, both civilian and military.
Such names as Morgan, Mosby, Custer, Kilpatrick, Shelby and Jeb Stuart are etched forever on the hallowed fields of conflict, but the courage and devotion of the unremembered legions who rode, sweated and died in their support are the unsung heroes of my journey. Yes, there is a place for the Custers and Shelbys in the annals of history, but one must remember that their careers were validated by the plain and true men who rode ignominiously in their shadows. ...

New post (Collection Adoption Offering ) has been published on War Horse Museum
08/19/2013
Collection Adoption Offering

New post (Collection Adoption Offering ) has been published on War Horse Museum


First, April 18, 2013 in the Kansas City area with a wind chill factor of 26 degrees; second, having lived 81 ½ years and still waking up in the morning excited about what the day has in store for me; third, having experienced the incredible journey of following the illustrious trail forged through the landscape of American history by mounted horsemen, both civilian and military.

Such names as Morgan, Mosby, Custer, Kilpatrick, Shelby and Jeb Stuart are etched forever on the hallowed fields of conflict, but the courage and devotion of the unremembered legions who rode, sweated and died in their support are the unsung heroes of my journey. Yes, there is a place for the Custers and Shelbys in the annals of history, but one must remember that their careers were validated by the plain and true men who rode ignominiously in their shadows. To these men, I vowed to honor and salute ...

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Timeline Photos
05/05/2013

Timeline Photos

Address

Cyber Street
Benton, KS
67017

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when War Horse Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Benton

Show All