University of Michigan Anthropology

University of Michigan Anthropology Welcome to the official page for the Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan.
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University of Michigan Anthropology
10/12/2020

University of Michigan Anthropology

If you didn't have a chance to attend our latest event in our Fall 2020 Speaker Series, you can follow this link to watc...
10/06/2020
Genetics, Evolution, and Human Behavior: Fall 2020 speaker series | U-M LSA Anthropology

If you didn't have a chance to attend our latest event in our Fall 2020 Speaker Series, you can follow this link to watch the recording!

Genetics, Evolution, and Human Behavior
Maria Nieves-Colón
Affiliated Researcher
School of Human Evolution and Social Change
Arizona State University

An integrative genomics approach to population history in Latin America & the Caribbean
https://lsa.umich.edu/anthro/news-events/all-news/search-news/genetics--evolution--and-human-behavior--fall-2020-speaker-serie.html

The Department of Anthropology & The Evolution and Human Adaptation Program (EHAP) at the University of Michigan are proud to present our Fall 2020 speaker series:

"Can I finally say “Welcome back”? I wonder if the expression fits. Are we really back?Did we ever leave?It seems we've ...
10/01/2020
Greetings from the Chair! | U-M LSA Anthropology

"Can I finally say “Welcome back”?

I wonder if the expression fits.

Are we really back?

Did we ever leave?

It seems we've been working all summer long, prepping for online courses and devising plans for climate repair in the department. If you are one of the 15 new students entering our graduate program this year, we'll probably meet and work with you on computer screens. Only a handful of faculty and students will encounter each other in classroom settings, and those encounters will be modified by face masks, lots of gaps between seats, and scrupulous protocols for entering and exiting the buildings..."

https://lsa.umich.edu/anthro/news-events/all-news/search-news/welcome-back.html

Fall 2020

09/21/2020
09/04/2020
Anthrcul 675: TECHNOSEMIOTICS : Technology, Media, & Culture In this seminar, we explore the communicative dimensions of...
08/27/2020

Anthrcul 675: TECHNOSEMIOTICS : Technology, Media, & Culture

In this seminar, we explore the communicative dimensions of technologies and techniques. For several decades now some in science and technology studies have aspired to yoke the “semiotic” and “material,” while over the same period scholars of language and communicative practice have tried to take seriously the material dimensions of discourse. This course draws these streams of inquiry together in an effort to think about technology and semiotics beyond the stubborn ideal−material antinomy.

Interested? Email Professor Michael Lempert, [email protected].

Congratulations to Professor Scott Stonington on the release of his new book, The Spirit Ambulance (2020 UC Press)."The ...
08/25/2020

Congratulations to Professor Scott Stonington on the release of his new book, The Spirit Ambulance (2020 UC Press).

"The Spirit Ambulance is a journey into decision-making at the end of life in Thailand, where families attempt to craft good deaths for their elders in the face of clashing ethical frameworks, from a rapidly developing universal medical system, to national and global human-rights politics, to contemporary movements in Buddhist metaphysics. Scott Stonington’s gripping ethnography documents how Thai families attempt to pay back a “debt of life” to their elders through intensive medical care, followed by a medically assisted rush from the hospital to home to ensure a spiritually advantageous last breath. The result is a powerful exploration of the nature of death and the complexities arising from the globalization of biomedical expertise and ethics around the world."
https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520343900/the-spirit-ambulance

08/21/2020
Byron Cummings Award 2020-John D. Speth

Congratulations to John Speth on receiving a 2020 Byron Cummings award from the Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society. The award is usually presented at the Pecos Conference but this year the awards are being presented virtually.

[email protected] Presentation of the Byron Cummings award with description of the award and John D. Speth's accomplishments.

Congratulations to alum Rebecca Louise Carter (PhD 2010)!  She received the 2020 Edie Turner First Book Prize in Ethnogr...
08/06/2020
2020 Winners of the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing and the Edie Turner First Book Prize in Ethnographic Writing | Society for Humanistic Anthropology

Congratulations to alum Rebecca Louise Carter (PhD 2010)! She received the 2020 Edie Turner First Book Prize in Ethnographic Writing for her book, "Prayers for the People: Homicide and Humanity in the Crescent City" (University of Chicago Press, 2019).

A new award, the Edie Turner First Book Prize in Ethnographic Writing is awarded by the The Society for Humanistic Anthropology.

Professor Carter is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Urban Studies at Brown University.

I am delighted to announce the 2020 winners of the Victor Turner Prize in Ethnographic Writing and the new Edie Turner First Book Prize in Ethnographic Writing. Despite the pandemic, there were no less than 87 entries, which is a new record high. There was no overlap between the awards (no one recei...

Congratulations to Anthropology 101 student Mackenzie Gard, who received an Outstanding First-Year Research Project Awar...
07/14/2020
Award Winners | U-M Library

Congratulations to Anthropology 101 student Mackenzie Gard, who received an Outstanding First-Year Research Project Award for her research paper “The TBI Experience: Patient, Caregiver, and Professional Perspectives on Traumatic Brain Injury and Rehabilitation.”

Mackenzie's mentor and Anthro 101 instructor Dr. Leigh Stuckey writes, “In evaluating Mackenzie’s project and paper, I was impressed by her perceptive research questions, the clarity of her writing, and the potential significance of her project to the field of Medical Anthropology. But what most struck me about Mackenzie’s work was her adept use of her sources, particularly for a first-year student.”

https://www.lib.umich.edu/undergraduate-research-award/award-winners

Professor Melissa Burch is a panelist for the upcoming webinar "Policing and Protest 2020" through the UM Eisenberg Inst...
07/13/2020
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: Policing and Protest 2020. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

Professor Melissa Burch is a panelist for the upcoming webinar "Policing and Protest 2020" through the UM Eisenberg Institute for Historical Studies.

July 28th, 4:00 PM. Pre-registration is required. This event will be recorded and available online.

"The killing of George Floyd, in the wake of the horrific and obscene history of the killings of unarmed black people by the police, has focused attention like never before on the systemic anti-black racism of the criminal-legal system in the United States. To be sure, the massive expansion and militarization of policing and incarceration are in some ways of comparatively recent origin. Yet they also have a much deeper origin in, and are inextricably connected to, a longer history of the judicial and extra-judicial violence against black people in the continent. The racist inequities of the criminal-legal system, indeed, are not a bug, but a feature."

Note: The webinar has a Q&A format. We welcome your questions before via email ([email protected]) and during the webinar via Zoom Q&A. The killing of George Floyd, in the wake of the horrific and obscene history of the killings of unarmed black people by the police, has focused attention like n...

The NOMIS Foundation in Switzerland has awarded Stuart Kirsch a five-year research grant for a new project on responses ...
07/10/2020

The NOMIS Foundation in Switzerland has awarded Stuart Kirsch a five-year research grant for a new project on responses to climate change, titled: "Pathways: Transitions to a Post-Carbon Future."

“One of the most urgent challenges facing the human species—and the planet—is the need to transition to a carbon-neutral economy. To some, this seems an impossible task. Yet human society, ever resilient and adaptive, has undergone comparable paradigmatic changes multiple times in the past with the shift to agriculture, urbanization, the Industrial Revolution and globalization. Even more rapid transformations are associated with the digital economy, many of which are being accelerated by the current global pandemic.”

https://nomisfoundation.ch/research-projects/transitions-pathways-to-a-post-carbon-future/

Professor Melissa Burch has been awarded a 2020 Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in support of her book project, ...
07/09/2020

Professor Melissa Burch has been awarded a 2020 Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in support of her book project, Captive Afterlives: Hiring and Job Seeking in the Criminal Records Complex.

The Ford Foundation Fellowship Programs competition is administered by the Fellowships Office of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The programs seek to increase the diversity of the nation’s college and university faculties by increasing their ethnic and racial diversity, to maximize the educational benefits of diversity, and to increase the number of professors who can and will use diversity as a resource for enriching the education of all students.

https://sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/FordFellowships/index.htm

Michigan Anthropology doctoral candidate Nina Jackson Levin's short film "Resilience/Resistance: A Short Film About Detr...
07/07/2020

Michigan Anthropology doctoral candidate Nina Jackson Levin's short film "Resilience/Resistance: A Short Film About Detroit" and article "When Resilience Turns to Resistance: A Detroit Case Study" came out recently.

Screening information available here: https://lsa.umich.edu/anthro/news-events/all-news/search-news/nina-jackson-levin-s-short-film--resilience-resistance--a-short-.html

This short film and its companion article serve in partial fulfilment of the U-M Department of Afroamerican and African Studies African American & Diasporic Studies Graduate Certificate. The film project, "Filming Future Cities," is created and directed by Prof. Damani Partridge (U-M Dept. of Anthropology and Afroamerican and African Studies). Prof. Jason De Léon's (Dept. of Anthropology, UCLA) "Doing Photoethnography" U-M graduate course also provided supervision for this project.

Please note this new Fall 2020 course will now be meeting MW 5:00-6:30PM.
07/06/2020

Please note this new Fall 2020 course will now be meeting MW 5:00-6:30PM.

New Fall 2020 Anthropology course! Anthrcul 357-002 (37542) Covid-19 Futures. NEW TIME MW 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Professor Stuart Kirsch

This class will consider the long-term impacts of Covid-19. The first third of the semester, we’ll read accounts of how past disasters (natural, industrial, or hybrid) resulted in structural change. We’ll spend the remainder of the semester examining arguments and discussions about how Covid-19 may alter the future. For example, the disruption to globalization may lead to shorter supply chains and changing patterns of local production. The origins of the pandemic may affect human-animal relationships, especially the consumption of wild animals. The long period of sheltering at home has already accelerated internet-mediated work, life, and educational practices, and we will consider the extent to which these changes will persist after Covid-19. The disproportionate impacts of the virus on different segments of society have prompted reevaluation of the fundamental social contract (including access to health care, living wages, and basic income support) holding society together, as well as racial inequality and injustice. The reduction in mobility and patterns of consumption may hasten the transition to renewable energy as well as efforts to phase out coal and petroleum use; we will consider the implications of this and other changes for climate change politics and policies. The reduction in travel and migration may lead to increased isolation and nationalism. Many other things may change as well, including the potential movement of populations away from megacities, as well as devising alternative ways to move within and make uses of spaces within cities. We will map out these different trends by using information from academic sources, the media, and other contributors to the public debates, including political voices on both the right and the left. To sharpen our understandings, students will also conduct (socially-distanced) interviews of various experts, authorities, and laypersons, including their peers. We will assess the likelihood of these developments, and evaluate their negative and positive ramifications and synergies. The students will be expected to do extensive research on their own, to summarize and present their findings on a regular and ongoing basis, and to work together as a team to produce a final report representing the findings of the class as a whole. We will develop both a database of information and an overarching narrative interpreting the data. Your final assessment for the course will be based predominately on your contributions to this collective work project rather than individual papers.

Michigan Anthropology PhD candidate Saquib Usman and Cornel West consider how bail decisions and grand jury indictments ...
07/01/2020
Why Was Derek Chauvin Granted Bail While Protestors Are Stuck In Jail? - Blavity

Michigan Anthropology PhD candidate Saquib Usman and Cornel West consider how bail decisions and grand jury indictments are rigged in favor of some and against others.

"Shifting scenes, we find analogous forms of alarmism and asphyxiating state violence being replicated across the American criminal justice system, from jail cells to courtrooms. Pointedly, Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, two protestors from Brooklyn who hurt no one have been detained at an especially dangerous federal prison. Meanwhile, Chauvin was granted bail."

If you’re interested in sharing your opinion on any cultural, political or personal topic, create an account here and check out our how-to post to learn more. ____ America’s mass outrage today draws provocation from the highly circulated scene of local police brutally and slowly killing a Black ...

New Fall 2020 Anthropology course!   Anthrcul 357-002 (37542)  Covid-19 Futures. NEW TIME MW 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Profe...
06/22/2020

New Fall 2020 Anthropology course! Anthrcul 357-002 (37542) Covid-19 Futures. NEW TIME MW 5:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Professor Stuart Kirsch

This class will consider the long-term impacts of Covid-19. The first third of the semester, we’ll read accounts of how past disasters (natural, industrial, or hybrid) resulted in structural change. We’ll spend the remainder of the semester examining arguments and discussions about how Covid-19 may alter the future. For example, the disruption to globalization may lead to shorter supply chains and changing patterns of local production. The origins of the pandemic may affect human-animal relationships, especially the consumption of wild animals. The long period of sheltering at home has already accelerated internet-mediated work, life, and educational practices, and we will consider the extent to which these changes will persist after Covid-19. The disproportionate impacts of the virus on different segments of society have prompted reevaluation of the fundamental social contract (including access to health care, living wages, and basic income support) holding society together, as well as racial inequality and injustice. The reduction in mobility and patterns of consumption may hasten the transition to renewable energy as well as efforts to phase out coal and petroleum use; we will consider the implications of this and other changes for climate change politics and policies. The reduction in travel and migration may lead to increased isolation and nationalism. Many other things may change as well, including the potential movement of populations away from megacities, as well as devising alternative ways to move within and make uses of spaces within cities. We will map out these different trends by using information from academic sources, the media, and other contributors to the public debates, including political voices on both the right and the left. To sharpen our understandings, students will also conduct (socially-distanced) interviews of various experts, authorities, and laypersons, including their peers. We will assess the likelihood of these developments, and evaluate their negative and positive ramifications and synergies. The students will be expected to do extensive research on their own, to summarize and present their findings on a regular and ongoing basis, and to work together as a team to produce a final report representing the findings of the class as a whole. We will develop both a database of information and an overarching narrative interpreting the data. Your final assessment for the course will be based predominately on your contributions to this collective work project rather than individual papers.

Michigan Anthropology alumna Yolanda Covington-Ward (PhD 2008), Chair and Associate Professor of Africana Studies at the...
06/19/2020
Open Letter to Pitt: Racial Justice and the Shifting Winds of a Nation

Michigan Anthropology alumna Yolanda Covington-Ward (PhD 2008), Chair and Associate Professor of Africana Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, wrote this open letter to her community.

Dear members of the Pitt community, As chair of the Department of Africana Studies, I, like many people across the country and around the world, was incredibly impacted by the recent public murder of George Floyd at the hands of law enforcement. Over the past few weeks I have shed tears, called f

Classic Museum of Anthropological Archaeology titles back in print: early archaeology, anthropology research now availab...
06/18/2020
Classic UMMAA titles back in print | U-M LSA Museum of Anthropological Archaeology

Classic Museum of Anthropological Archaeology titles back in print: early archaeology, anthropology research now available in print and as ebooks.

"After many months of collaboration between the UMMAA and the University of Michigan Press, the Museum’s independent publishing unit is pleased to announce that the entire collection of UMMAA published books is back in print."

Early archaeology, anthropology research now available in print and as ebooks

Professor Damani Partridge was featured on The Wire. "But the reaction to this killing shows that there is a coalition o...
06/17/2020
Watch | Black Lives Matter: People Will Have to Keep Pushing to Make Systemic Change Happen

Professor Damani Partridge was featured on The Wire.

"But the reaction to this killing shows that there is a coalition of People of colour, white people, marching all over the world and that makes it different, says American academic Damani Partridge. Will these protests achieve anything?

Would reducing funding to the police and routing it to social services help? Professor Partridge, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Afro-American and African studies at the University of Michigan speaks to Sidharth Bhatia."

Professor Damani Partridge, Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Department of Afro-American and African studies at the University of Michigan speaks to Sidharth Bhatia.

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101 West Hall, 1085 S University Ave
Ann Arbor, MI
48109-1107

General information

Anthropology focuses on human biological and cultural variation in time and space, with four traditionally recognized sub-fields: - Anthropological archaeology - Biological anthropology - Sociocultural anthropology - Linguistic anthropology The Department of Anthropology at the University of Michigan has been and remains a four-field department. We teach, train students, and do research across the four sub-fields and have faculty in each. Our undergraduates and graduate students learn, at the appropriate level, the fundamentals of the four sub-fields, their interactions and links with one another, and their relation to other academic fields.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 05:00

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(734) 764-7274

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