Andersonville National Historic Site

Andersonville National Historic Site Welcome to the official page for Andersonville National Historic Site! The park's mission is to provide an understanding of the overall prisoner of war story of the Civil War and to interpret the role of prisoner of war camps in history.
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Welcome! Andersonville National Historic Site includes the site of Camp Sumter Civil War Military Prison; Andersonville National Cemetery; & the National Prisoner of War Museum. Park grounds & the national cemetery are open 8:00 am-5:00 pm daily. The National Prisoner of War Museum is open 9:30 am-4:30 pm daily. No fee is charged to visit. Page Expectations & Guidelines: We hope this will become a place where fans feel comfortable sharing information and experiences, about Andersonville, American prisoners of war, and with one another. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. Please be considerate of other fan's opinions. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions, nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Such posts and/or links are subject to deletion. People who continue to post such content and/or links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. We do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Posting of external links on this site that are intended as advertising (or to drive traffic to websites unrelated to Andersonville), or do not contribute to dialog and discussions about the park may be deleted. People who continue to post such links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. External links do not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of Interior.

Prisoners were not the first to experience a loss of freedom at Andersonville. After the location of the prison was sele...
04/07/2020

Prisoners were not the first to experience a loss of freedom at Andersonville.

After the location of the prison was selected, the site was buzzing with hundreds of enslaved men, impressed from the surrounding area, working to clear thousands of trees to build the stockade and outbuildings that would eventually hold a total of 45,000 captives.

As prisoners arrived at the always evolving construction site, African American soldiers were pulled aside and forced to work alongside the enslaved people that built the walls penning them in. Digging ditches, pulling up tree stumps, and performing other hard labor tasks filled the hours for these men of color.

New faces emerged in the beginning of August 1864. After a failed liberation attempt of Andersonville, an ad ran in several local newspapers asking for more slave labor to be sent to the prison. The ad was a desperate plea to send help in order to fortify the prison. From inside the stockade prisoners could see these men, a mixture of prisoners and enslaved men of color, feverishly working to build earthwork fortifications. The sight filled prisoners with hope. Fortifications meant the Union was near.

After the war, the United State Colored Troops and freedmen were instrumental in the success of the Reburial Program and the establishment of several national cemeteries across the United States, including Andersonville National Cemetery. The work of these men can still be seen here at Andersonville, throughout the historic prison site and cemetery, in the form of historic earthworks and hundreds of neat rows of headstones. (JH)(NPS Photo)

04/04/2020
Andersonville National Historic Site

Good Morning Everyone!

Due to the new shelter-in-place order issued by Georgia's Governor Brian Kemp we will not be going live for our Social Saturday video of Andersonville National Cemetery this morning.

However, we hope you will enjoy this live video of the cemetery that we did for Veterans Day. Feel free to drop your questions about the cemetery in the comments below and we will continue to answer them!

We'll be back doing live videos on Saturday mornings as soon as we can.

Veterans Day at Andersonville National Cemetery

#COVID19 Update: In response to further guidance from the Governor of the State of Georgia and the Georgia Department of...
04/03/2020

#COVID19 Update: In response to further guidance from the Governor of the State of Georgia and the Georgia Department of Health, Andersonville National Historic Site is announcing additional modifications to operations to support federal, state, and local efforts to slow the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19).

Beginning Saturday, April 4, Andersonville National Cemetery will be open to the public from 8:00 am - 5:00 pm Monday-Friday, and will be temporarily closed on Saturday and Sunday. No public restrooms or other facilities will be available in the park, and no visitor services or public programs will be provided.

The National Prisoner of War Museum and the historic prison site remain temporarily closed.

Burial services to eligible veterans and their family members continue to be provided. However, no committal services or rendering of military honors are permitted at this time, and no more than 10 immediate family members may witness burials. Families can request to conduct a proper committal service when conditions allow.

Further updates will be posted to the park website at https://www.nps.gov/ande/planyourvisit/conditions.htm and on our social media channels.

Who do you pass by in a day? How do you pass them by? Some of us nod and exchange pleasantries. Others avoid eye contact...
04/03/2020

Who do you pass by in a day? How do you pass them by? Some of us nod and exchange pleasantries. Others avoid eye contact and keep moving. Few strike up a conversation. Have you ever thought about who you pass by, what story they have to tell?

The National Prisoner of War Museum sees and average of 130,000 visitors per year. Some share their stories; like the first time they read about the infamous Civil War prison Andersonville or they were just driving by and stumbled upon the park. Others tell more intimate stories: how they wore a POW bracelet during the Vietnam War for a young man from their hometown or how their father never really talked about his time in a German prisoner of war camp. We never know who is going to come through our doors.

The American Prisoner of War story is one that is still being written. Men and women who were once confined by the enemy are still alive today. Occasionally, a former POW walks through the doors of the National Prisoner of War Museum. They sometimes share their story, mention they were a prisoner, or they may not say anything at all about their former status. You’d never know they were a prisoner of the enemy unless they decided to share their story with you.

The men in this photograph, ex-Union prisoners, look just like any other older gentleman from that time. Graying beards, sharply dressed. People passed them by, just like we pass by people every day. (SH)(“Great Group of ex-Union prisoners,” Daniel W. Webb c. 1884; LoC Photo)

⭐We're Hiring!⭐Do you like working with the general public? Are you passionate about American history? Do you like leadi...
04/01/2020

⭐We're Hiring!⭐

Do you like working with the general public? Are you passionate about American history? Do you like leading guided tours or talks? Then we have just the position for you!

Two Park Guide positions have opened at Andersonville National Historic site in the Interpretation and Education Division. Find out more, including how to apply, by following the links to the following job announcements on USA Jobs:
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/563027700
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/563028600
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/564363000
https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/564363300

Application deadlines are quickly approaching - don't miss out!

Wow! 😃 Thank you for joining me this morning for our Social Saturday!! I’ll scroll through the comments on the live vide...
03/28/2020

Wow! 😃 Thank you for joining me this morning for our Social Saturday!! I’ll scroll through the comments on the live video and answer the questions I missed.

Join me again next Saturday, April 4 at 10:00am as we stroll through Andersonville National Cemetery. Bring coffee ☕️ (and tell the pine pollen to go away 🤧)

- Ranger J

03/28/2020

Good Morning! Join us for a virtual visit and ranger chat!

Join us this Saturday for a virtual visit! We’ll be streaming on Facebook live as a part of our new Social Saturday seri...
03/27/2020

Join us this Saturday for a virtual visit!

We’ll be streaming on Facebook live as a part of our new Social Saturday series. You’ll be able to chat with a ranger, see sites from the park, and learn something new!

The live stream will begin at 10:00am tomorrow, March 28! Bring your favorite cup of coffee (or tea), and set up on the comfy side of the couch. ☕️

(NPS Photo)

Never ForgetAndersonville National Historic Site not only serves as a memorial to all Prisoners of War (POWs) throughout...
03/27/2020

Never Forget

Andersonville National Historic Site not only serves as a memorial to all Prisoners of War (POWs) throughout American history, but it also serves as a classroom for our students and military. In this photo from December 1980, Park Technician Sarah Langston gives an orientation to Officer Candidate School (OCS) personnel.

Over the years several military groups, like OCS candidates, have visited the park and museum. As members of our armed forces, becoming a POW is something they must mentally prepare for. Not only do these groups extensively learn about what occurred at Andersonville, but they also learn about the personal stories of POWs from other conflicts.

As these service men and women roam the historic prison site and national cemetery, they have the chance to observe monuments etched with notations like “Death Before Dishonor” – a similar theme that rings throughout the United States Code of Conduct. “If I am captured, I will continue to resist by all means available…If I become a prisoner of war, I will keep faith with my fellow prisoners…I will never forget that I am an American fighting for freedom…”

#FlashbackFriday (NPS Photo)

#COVID19 Update: Following guidance from the CDC and recommendations from state and local public health authorities in c...
03/24/2020

#COVID19 Update: Following guidance from the CDC and recommendations from state and local public health authorities in consultation with NPS Public Health Service Officers, the National Prisoner of War Museum and the historic prison site area of Andersonville National Historic Site are temporarily closed to public access as of March 24, 2020. All public restrooms are also temporarily closed.

Andersonville National Cemetery remains open to the public from 8 am to 5 pm daily. Burial services to eligible veterans and their family members are still being provided. However, no committal services or rendering of military honors are permitted at this time, and no more than 10 immediate family members may witness burials. Families can request to conduct a proper committal service when conditions allow.

Updates will be posted to the park website at https://www.nps.gov/ande/planyourvisit/conditions.htm and on our social media channels.

03/21/2020
A Peaceful Moment at Providence Spring

How about enjoying a peaceful moment, listening to the birds and the cool running water at Providence Spring and reflecting pool? Video taken at Andersonville National Historic Site on the morning of March 21,2020.

#COVID19 Update (March 20th):Starting March 23, 2020, as a matter of public health and safety, committal services and th...
03/20/2020

#COVID19 Update (March 20th):

Starting March 23, 2020, as a matter of public health and safety, committal services and the rendering of military funeral honors, whether by military personnel or volunteer organizations, will not be conducted until further notice at Andersonville National Cemetery. Interments/burials will continue, and immediate family members (limited to 10 individuals) of the deceased may choose to witness the interment if desired.

The cemetery, including public restrooms, will remain open to visitors, but we strongly urge all guests to follow CDC social distancing guidelines, heed local travel restrictions, and avoid unnecessary travel. All park buildings, including the Cemetery Office and the National Prisoner of War Museum, remain closed.

To schedule a burial, call 229-924-0343 ext. 112. Park staff may be working remotely or out conducting burials, so if no one is available to take your call please leave a detailed message including the date, time, and phone number.

Keep checking Andersonville National Historic Site's Facebook or Twitter pages for updates on operating status. #HonoringVeterans #NoVeteranEverDies #Andersonville #StaySafeStayHome

**IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT**As of March 18, 2020, the National Prisoner of War Museum will be closed until further notice....
03/17/2020

**IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT**

As of March 18, 2020, the National Prisoner of War Museum will be closed until further notice. All public programs and events are cancelled until further notice. The park grounds and restrooms, including in Andersonville National Cemetery, will remain open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. daily.

The health and safety of our visitors, employees, volunteers, and partners is our number one priority. We will notify the public when we resume full operations and provide updates on our website and social media channels.

You can access online audio tours of the historic prison site and cemetery, as well as videos about the park, its history, and American prisoners of war, at https://www.nps.gov/ande/learn/photosmultimedia/multimedia.htm.

Watch videos about the park and its history on our website at https://www.nps.gov/ande/learn/photosmultimedia/story-in-stone.htm or YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2IJCqxeKsKMlxDH5dfYMhA.

The NPS urges visitors to help "slow the spread" of coronavirus by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups; washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds; avoiding touching your eyes, nose, and mouth; covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze; and most importantly, staying home if you feel sick.

For high-risk populations, such as the elderly and people with underlying conditions, we ask that they take extra caution and follow CDC guidance for those at higher risk of serious illness.

Updates about NPS operations will be posted on www.nps.gov/coronavirus. Please check with individual parks for specific details about their park's operations.

Women of Andersonville“What happened to the other prisons from the Civil War?”That’s a question staff and volunteers hea...
03/17/2020

Women of Andersonville

“What happened to the other prisons from the Civil War?”

That’s a question staff and volunteers hear at Andersonville in a variety of forms every day. It’s a question that reflects how well Andersonville has been preserved over time. You can see where the stockade wall stood, where Union POWs dug wells, and the final resting place of nearly 13,000 men. You can’t always see those things at other Civil War prison sites. At Andersonville, we see it up close thanks to a group of ladies.

The Woman’s Relief Corps acquired the property that held the stockade in 1897. They planted trees, fenced the property, and built a caretaker’s home. With this, these women created the Andersonville Prison Park. Throughout the next 13 years, the Woman’s Relief Corps encouraged states to build monuments to their men who had suffered and died at Andersonville.

During every national convention, the Woman’s Relief Corps considered Andersonville Prison Park. They cared for it and ensured the story would be preserved. Eventually, the prison park was transferred to the U.S. War Department in 1911. On that occasion, National Secretary Ida Wilson Moore declared “It is a place for the most serious thoughts and the most sacred memories; every day is a Memorial Day.”

During Women’s History Month, we at Andersonville National Historic Site thank the women who came before. Without them, we wouldn’t have the Andersonville we know today. (SH)(LoC Photo of the Woman's Relief Corps, ca. 1890)

National Park Service
03/13/2020
National Park Service

National Park Service

The National Park Service Office of Public Health and the US Public Health Service is closely monitoring the situation related to the outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (COVID-19). In accordance with CDC guidance and other federal, state, and local health authorities, visitors can be assured that facilities in national parks, including lodges and restaurants, continue to maintain high standards related to the health and wellness of staff and visitors.

More information, updates, and links to specific information about parks can be found at https://www.nps.gov/aboutus/news/public-health-update.htm

Different Monuments. Same Story.There are 25 monuments at Andersonville. All commemorating prisoners of war, these monum...
03/10/2020

Different Monuments. Same Story.

There are 25 monuments at Andersonville. All commemorating prisoners of war, these monuments scatter across the historic prison site and the national cemetery. As you pass by, you’ll see soldiers atop obelisks with bowed heads or leaning on the structure for a moment of rest. Have you ever looked closely at these figures?

In the Memorial Courtyard stands the American Ex-Prisoners of War Memorial Sculpture. Its anchored in the center by a gaunt figure, clothes hanging off their body, and trickles of water slowly moving through their hands. This figure looks up at you, wanting something more. Likewise, at the entrance to the cemetery towers the Georgia Monument. Three figures move in unison. Their eyes dart in different directions. In various states of struggle, they’re holding each other up.

These four bodies twist and move slowly, staggering along. Faces are shallow and long with eyes that have seen too much, yet forward they move. No matter the conflict, these prisoners experienced similar things. (SH)(NPS Photos)

What a Weekend! We had an incredible weekend with some Girl Scouts from across Georgia as we taught them about archaeolo...
03/08/2020

What a Weekend!

We had an incredible weekend with some Girl Scouts from across Georgia as we taught them about archaeology and resource stewardship through the Girl Scout Resource Ranger Program. From learning about the history of Andersonville and the Civil War, to participating in a simulated archaeological dig these girls were able to get hands on with history!

Huge “Thank You!” to the Southeast Archaeological Center for providing this wonderful opportunity!

⭐️Announcement⭐️Due to unforeseen circumstances, we regret to announce that our upcoming annual Living History Weekend e...
03/01/2020

⭐️Announcement⭐️

Due to unforeseen circumstances, we regret to announce that our upcoming annual Living History Weekend event on March 7 & 8 has been canceled.

However, we will present a special, first person interpretive program on “The Women of Andersonville Prison” on Saturday, March 7 at 1:00 PM as part of our Park 50th Anniversary First Saturday programs. We will also offer guided walking tours of the historic prison site.

The Girl Scout Resource Ranger Program will be offered on March 7 & 8 as scheduled.

Please message or contact the park at 229– 924–0343 or [email protected] with any questions.

Recording Life in Prison“This morning I suppose is the first of this month.”That’s what M.J. Umsted penned in his diary ...
03/01/2020

Recording Life in Prison

“This morning I suppose is the first of this month.”

That’s what M.J. Umsted penned in his diary March 1, 1865. Taken prisoner summer 1864, he was sent to Andersonville. After Union General Sherman captured Atlanta in September, the Confederacy evacuated prisoners out of the path they thought the Union army was taking. As a result, Umsted and his fellow prisoners went to Savannah. Umsted was then part of a group of prisoners who marched from Thomasville, GA back to Andersonville, GA in December. They took 6 days to march over 100 miles.

All through this experience the young soldier from Iowa kept a diary. He’s not alone. Over time prisoners of war have kept diaries, smuggled cameras, hid paper for letters, created newspapers, and bartered for goods. Anything to keep your mind occupied and your body alive.

As he did almost every day of his imprisonment, Umsted wrote on March 1. At Andersonville that day, he noted: “it is a somewhat prettier morning than yesterday’s morning during the after part of the day the sun shone out quite bright and pleasant.” Umsted saw many more mornings at Andersonville before he was exchanged and sent north in April 1865. (SH)(NPS Photo)

Address

496 Cemetery Rd
Andersonville, GA
31711

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00
Saturday 08:00 - 17:00
Sunday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(229) 924-0343

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Comments

I would like to visit. Can you still drive around the prison site grounds? In such a wide open space, I don’t believe it would be hard to social distance. Thanks.
3rd Great Grandfather discovery..,.,
Are we on?
Two years ago I visiting Andersonville and had downloaded the audio driving tour prior to arrival. We plan to return next week with friends but are unable to locate the audio driving tour again to download in advance. Anyone have the link?
Will you be open on January 20th? When will the wreaths be taken up?
Notable African-American Civil War soldiers are the subject of MLK Day programming at the Atlanta History Center.
To all that ordered Yankee Hotel I mailed the first wave of books--- look for them in the mail. Should have Friday or Saturday. Thank you
I see you are posting for people, can I get a picture of Pvt Samuel Cutler Burdick PLOT# 2134. Memorial Id #6929411. Thank you.
Laurence Lovins December 23, 2019
I love visiting Andersonville National Cemetery. I volunteered to lay wreaths as well as take photo requests of headstones with the wreaths. I’m planning on going back the Jan 3rd, or soon there after, so I’ll be more then happy to take photo requests for anyone. You can give me your info here, or just PM me. Here are a pic I took Dec. 14
I took that photo!
Research question for the Staff: the attached photo shows at least 3 graves of Unknown soldiers marked with the small square stones. When were the square stones replaced with the standard headstones?