Andersonville National Historic Site

Andersonville National Historic Site Welcome to the official page for Andersonville National Historic Site! The park's mission is to provide an understanding of the overall prisoner of war story of the Civil War and to interpret the role of prisoner of war camps in history.
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Welcome! Andersonville National Historic Site includes the site of Camp Sumter Civil War Military Prison; Andersonville National Cemetery; & the National Prisoner of War Museum. Park grounds & the national cemetery are open 8:00 am-5:00 pm daily. The National Prisoner of War Museum is open 9:30 am-4:30 pm daily. No fee is charged to visit. Page Expectations & Guidelines: We hope this will become a place where fans feel comfortable sharing information and experiences, about Andersonville, American prisoners of war, and with one another. While this is an open forum, it is also a family friendly one, so please keep your comments and wall posts clean. Please be considerate of other fan's opinions. We do not allow graphic, obscene, explicit or racial comments or submissions, nor do we allow comments that are abusive, hateful or intended to defame anyone or any organization. We do not allow solicitations or advertisements. This includes promotion or endorsement of any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. Such posts and/or links are subject to deletion. People who continue to post such content and/or links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. We do not allow attempts to defame or defraud any financial, commercial or non-governmental agency. We do not allow comments that suggest or encourage illegal activity. You participate at your own risk, taking personal responsibility for your comments, your username and any information provided. Posting of external links on this site that are intended as advertising (or to drive traffic to websites unrelated to Andersonville), or do not contribute to dialog and discussions about the park may be deleted. People who continue to post such links may be subject to page participation restrictions and/or removal from the page. External links do not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. National Park Service or the U.S. Department of Interior.

Operating as usual

Today we honor all those captured and missing in action on this National POW/MIA Recognition Day. In the United States p...
09/18/2020

Today we honor all those captured and missing in action on this National POW/MIA Recognition Day. In the United States prisoners of war have been held in every conflict since the American Revolution. Let us take a moment today to remember all the men and women of the Armed Forces who have been prisoners of war and those who are still missing in action and reflect on their sacrifice. (DD) Image: POW/MIA flag designed by the National League of Families.

09/18/2020

Park phone lines are currently down due to storm damage. Until they are repaired please email the park at [email protected] or message us through Facebook for questions or information.

April 8, 1864 — “Battese, a big Indian, rather helped me out of the scrape. All of our mess came to my rescue. Came to a...
09/18/2020

April 8, 1864 — “Battese, a big Indian, rather helped me out of the scrape. All of our mess came to my rescue. Came to a near fight with dozens engaged. Battese is a large full-blooded six-foot Minnesota Indian, has quarters near us, and is a noble fellow. He and other Indians have been in our hundred for some weeks. They are quiet, attend to their own business, and won’t stand much nonsense. Great deal of fighting.” — John Ransom

During the Civil War, approximately 20,000 Native American served in the Union and Confederate armies. By pledging their allegiance to the Federal government, Native Americans hoped that their efforts in military service would end their discrimination and relocation from ancestral lands. However, even after the Union army claimed victory and the war ended, the U.S. government continued its policies on the removal of Native American tribes.

In the Union army, the most famous Native American unit was Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters. The majority of this unit was Ottawa, Delaware, Huron Oneida, Potawatomi and Ojibwa. Company K was assigned to the Army of the Potomac under the command of General Ulysses S. Grant and participated in some of the most famous battles of the Civil War. However, a number of these Native Americans of Company K were captured and imprisoned at Andersonville. According to John Ransom, an Andersonville prisoner who documented his prison experience at the camp, his survival depended greatly upon his friend Battese who he described as a Minnesota Indian. Ransom described Battese as a “father figure” and a person whom he literally could not live without. Battese also played a large role in nursing Ransom back to life during Andersonville’s deadly summer in 1864. Though Battese was able to survive the camp, seven other members of Company K’s Native American prisoners died that summer and are now buried in the Andersonville National Cemetery.

June 16, 1864 — “Battese is an angel; takes better care of me than himself. Although not in our mess or tent, he is nearly all the time with us. It is wonderful the powers of endurance he has. I have always been blessed with friends, and friends, too, of the right sort.” — John Ransom

Image: Battese was part of the most famous Native American unit of Company K, 1st Michigan Sharpshooters, and whom John Ransom highly depended on during his time at Andersonville.

A Tribute to Ed Bearss Few people have had a passion for history like Ed Bearss. Ed was a Marine Corps veteran of WWII, ...
09/17/2020

A Tribute to Ed Bearss

Few people have had a passion for history like Ed Bearss. Ed was a Marine Corps veteran of WWII, serving in the Pacific Theater. After returning from the war, he used his GI Bill to further his education and obtain a master’s degree in history from Indiana University in 1955. By 1958, he became the Southeast Regional Historian for the National Park Service.
In 1970, when Andersonville National Historic Site became part of the National Park Service, Ed Bearss’ mission was to provide the first historical research study of the site. His report focused on the structural history of the prison. It provided information about the evolution and construction history of the prison and created a Historical Base Map which geographically located and identified the stockade and other structures on the grounds. Bearss did archeological investigations to verify locations and construction. His report also contained a detailed administrative history of the prison. Ed’s research was paramount in establishing the story of Andersonville so future generations would understand the tragedy that occurred here.
On November 1, 1981, Ed Bearss was named the Chief Historian for the National Park Service, a position he held until 1994. Throughout his lifetime, he wrote numerous books on military history and the Civil War. Ed passed away on September 15, 2020 at the age of 97. His knowledge and passion for Civil War history will be sorely missed. (PJ, TS)

(Photo Courtesy Encore Interpretive Design)

“The cemetery is a beautiful spot. Surely, I thought, the dear boys could have died more peacefully had they foreseen th...
09/17/2020

“The cemetery is a beautiful spot. Surely, I thought, the dear boys could have died more peacefully had they foreseen that the place of their burial would have been so kindly cared for.”
--Francis C. Curtis, Co E 1 Massachusetts; Andersonville survivor.

Image Description: Andersonville National Cemetery at sunrise.

“I believe I state the truth in saying that, before that fatal summer was past, two in three of those two thousand stron...
09/16/2020

“I believe I state the truth in saying that, before that fatal summer was past, two in three of those two thousand strong, robust, healthy men, that came among us, flushed with spirit and hope, slept their last sleep in the prisoners' grave at Andersonville and Millen.” –H. M. Davidson, 1st OH Light Artillery, Fourteen Months in Rebel Prisons

On April 17, 1864, Confederate forces under the command of Major General Robert F. Hoke, attacked the Federal garrison at Plymouth, North Carolina. After three days of fighting, the Union post commander raised a white flag, surrendering nearly three thousand men. Marching towards the railroad at Rocky Mount, these men would make a pilgrimage for five days and then be shoved into cramped cattle cars to be transported on a four-day journey to Andersonville.

The prisoners captured at Plymouth entered the gates of Andersonville, stricken by the conditions and appearances of all the other prisoners. With their long frock coats and regulation hats, the Union prisoners were given the nickname “Plymouth Pilgrims” for their stylish uniforms. Before their surrender, the Plymouth boys had never experienced hardship like many of their prison mates. Receiving a back-pay from re-enlisting after three years of service, the young men also carried with them large sums of money into camp. As a result, they flooded the market prices and made supplies and rations unobtainable for much of the prison’s population. Unable to assimilate to the habits of the prison camp, they began to waste away their money and fall powerless into the hands of that fatal summer. In August 1864, Andersonville had become the most crowded and deadly it has ever been. By September of that year, nearly half of the prisoners that were captured at Plymouth died.

Image: Edward Boots, 101st Pennsylvania. Boots was among the men that were nicknamed the “Plymouth Pilgrims” who were captured on April 20, 1864. He died at Andersonville in September 1864 and is buried in grave 8,606.

"You caution the Rebel Chieftain, that the United States knows no distinction in her Soldiers. She insists on having all...
09/12/2020

"You caution the Rebel Chieftain, that the United States knows no distinction in her Soldiers. She insists on having all her Soldiers of whatever creed or Color, to be treated according to the usages of War. Now if the United States exacts uniformity of treatment of her Soldiers from the Insurgents, would it not be well and consistent to set the example herself by paying all her Soldiers alike?" -- James H. Gooding to President Abraham Lincoln

James Henry Gooding was born into slavery on August 28, 1838. He soon became free and went to New York where he enrolled in the New York Colored Orphan’s Asylum. There he received a classical education and quickly became a talented and eloquent writer. At the age of 18 he took a job aboard a whaling ship which sailed from New Bedford, Massachusetts. He earned a good living as a whaler and made his home in New Bedford, where he lived with his wife Ellen Allen.

After the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, African Americans were permitted to enlist on behalf of the war effort. Gooding enlisted in the 54th Massachusetts Infantry on February 14th, 1863. Throughout his service he wrote letters to the New Bedford Mercury tracking the regiment’s progress. They were sent to the barrier islands of Georgia and South Carolina where they saw little action. This soon changed when they were ordered to assault Fort Wagner near Charleston, South Carolina. Writing of the attack Gooding said: “We met the foe on the parapet of Wagner with the bayonet…” Despite their heroic efforts, African American soldiers were still paid less than white soldiers. Gooding wrote President Lincoln demanding equal pay asking: “Are we Soldiers or are we Labourers?”

Gooding continued to fight and in February of 1864 was wounded and captured at the Battle of Olustee in Florida. He was taken to Andersonville in March and died there on July 19, 1864. The previous month Congress had passed a law granting equal pay for African American soldiers. Gooding was laid to rest at Andersonville National Cemetery in grave 3,585.

Visit our partners at New Bedford Whaling National Historical Park, Boston African American National Historic Site, and Fort Sumter and Fort Moultrie National Historical Park to learn more.

Image: The gravestone of James H. Gooding in Andersonville National Cemetery. (NPS Photos)

“I don’t really know how far they would have gone, whether they would have killed me or not. I don’t really know… I knew...
09/11/2020

“I don’t really know how far they would have gone, whether they would have killed me or not. I don’t really know… I knew one of two things was going to happen. I would either go insane or I would die. Either my mind or my body was going to crack.” – Floyd “Jim” Thompson, talking of his time spent as a prisoner of war in North Vietnam.

After his plane went down over North Vietnamese territory, Floyd Thompson survived with a broken back, but was quickly taken prisoner by the Viet Cong. He remained an American prisoner of war for the next 3,278 days; just ten days shy of 9 years. Throughout his time there, Thompson would spend several of those years almost entirely alone; living in a bamboo cage in solitary confinement, he experienced mental torture beyond his own ability to describe.

As the longest held American POW in history, Floyd Thompson endured years of violent interrogations, forced labor, no sleep, and beatings. However, Thompson refused to give up any information that he had, fully expecting this treatment to continue until he eventually died. After almost 9 years of this torture, he was released in March of 1973 as part of Operation Homecoming. Unfortunately, Thompson’s struggles did not end there, as he had to adjust to life all over again. To read more about Floyd Thompson’s life, be sure to check out “Glory Denied: The Vietnam Saga of Jim Thompson, America’s Longest Held Prisoner of War" by Tom Philpott.
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Image 1: Floyd Thompson’s military portrait before the war (US Army/POW Network)
Image 2: Floyd Thompson’s memorial headstone located at Andersonville National Cemetery (NPS Photo)

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used...
09/11/2020
Flight 93 National Memorial (U.S. National Park Service)

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the attack on the U.S. Capitol was thwarted.
Today the National Park Service, its volunteers, and its partners work to honor their actions and to try to understand more fully the legacy of Flight 93 and the other events of 9/11.
For more information:
https://www.nps.gov/flni/index.htm
#NPS #FindYourPark

On Tuesday morning, September 11, 2001, the U.S. came under attack when four commercial airliners were hijacked and used to strike targets on the ground. Nearly 3,000 people tragically lost their lives. Because of the actions of the 40 passengers and crew aboard one of the planes, Flight 93, the att...

How would you pay tribute to a fallen brother in arms? We invite you to join us at 7 pm on Thursday 9/17 for a free onli...
09/10/2020

How would you pay tribute to a fallen brother in arms?

We invite you to join us at 7 pm on Thursday 9/17 for a free online program about the Bataan Death March, World War II, and the Sack of Cement Cross. Featured guests will include historians, filmmakers, researchers, the park Superintendent, and a 98 year old former prisoner of war and veteran of WWII.

Register for this FREE program at www.eventbrite.com/e/118216967131

Following the American Civil War, millions of formerly enslaved people were without homes or livelihoods. Left to create...
09/09/2020

Following the American Civil War, millions of formerly enslaved people were without homes or livelihoods. Left to create their own communities from nothing, these people made neighborhoods out of places that are now legacy landmarks of the Civil War. However, their part in the story is often left out.

Arlington, Virginia, was once home to a large freedman’s village. This community was established on the property of Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s wife and family, the same land that is now recognized as Arlington National Cemetery. But before the land became a final resting place for American military personnel, it had homes, schools, and churches. Feeling the need to expand the cemetery and separate from the people living there, the government bought out the land for $75,000, half of what they had paid the Lee family for the land. While Arlington House remains a preserved historic site, no trace of the freedman's village exists today.

Andersonville, Georgia, also became a newly freed community after the Civil War. Freed people used the abandoned prison stockade wood to build homes. They farmed the land and established a growing community. In 1866, a freedman's school was established in the Confederate hospital that once cared for prison guards. African Americans also worked for the U.S. Army and transformed the rough prison burial ground into a beautiful, enclosed national cemetery.

Among these freed people was Floyd Snelson, who attended the new Sumter School starting in December 1867. He quickly learned to read and write, and within a year he began teaching at the school during the summer. He also worked at the national cemetery, eventually becoming a foreman. He was a community leader and became politically active and president of the local Grant Club.

Meanwhile Benjamin Dykes, who had owned the land before the war, wanted his land back. He warned the teachers to stay away, complained to government officials, and threatened violence. On July 29, 1868, Dykes and other Whites - including the county sheriff - seized the keys to the schoolhouse and evicted between 200 and 300 men, women, and children from their homes. Snelson stayed and defended his home each night from attacks. One night, he wrote, the Whites "came in firing, and burned up eight of the small houses."

While sites like Arlington and Andersonville hold great importance as final resting places of honor for American soldiers, many of them hold other, painful histories that in some cases have literally been erased.

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Source: Kutzler et al. 2020. In Plain Sight: African Americans at Andersonville National Historic Site.
Image 1: Group of African American children holding books in front of a large white building in the Arlington Freedman’s Village (LOC Photo)
Image 2: African American children around a man inside the Andersonville National Cemetery (NPS Photo)

Why is the National Prisoner of War Museum designed the way that it is? Why does it look the way that it does?Opened in ...
09/07/2020

Why is the National Prisoner of War Museum designed the way that it is? Why does it look the way that it does?

Opened in 1998, the design of the National Prisoner of War Museum was purposeful and meaningful. Approaching the building, visitors see a solid maroon brick building, punctuated by three gray towers, used to evoke a feeling reminiscent of prisons. The museum builds upon themes that are common to all prisoner of war stories: towers, gates, and confinement. The sidewalk leading the building narrows, forcing visitors to approach single file or in pairs, reflective of how prisoners have been marched throughout history.

A place of reflection and contemplation for the difficult stories that the museum tells is also a necessary component of the museum. That space is provided with the American Ex-Prisoners of War sculpture, “The Price of Freedom Fully Paid.” The three carved brick panels contain 25 figures depicting the suffering of a POW. The meandering water feature reminds visitors of the vitality of water to a prisoner of any war. A bronze figure stands in front of the brick panels, representing someone who has escaped imprisonment, drank freely from the water below, and is looking upward in thanksgiving, finally having reached freedom, fully paid.
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Image 1: American and POW/MIA flags flying above the National Prisoner of War Museum (NPS Photo)
Image 2: The brick and bronze sculpture “The Price of Freedom Fully Paid” depicting an escaped prisoner, at night (NPS Photo/Hugh Peacock)

From its creation in February 1864, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville, has always had an interesting story to s...
09/04/2020

From its creation in February 1864, Camp Sumter, better known as Andersonville, has always had an interesting story to share. During the last 14 months of the Civil War, Andersonville acted as a prison for 45,000 Union prisoners of war. However, the story does not end there, as interest in Andersonville continued in the years following the war.

Immediately after the war, the U.S. government seized the land. Newly freed people established homes and farms on the site where the prison stockade once stood. They were the first to preserve and honor the graves of the thousands of Union soldiers who suffered and died at Andersonville. Some began working for the U.S. Army to help transform the prisoners’ burial ground into a new national cemetery.

But Benjamin Dykes, who owned the land before the war, wanted it back. In summer 1868, after complaining and threatening didn’t work, Dykes and a group of Whites, including the county sheriff, forcibly removed the freed men, women, and children living on the prison site and burned some of their homes.

In 1875, after lengthy and bitter legal proceedings, Dykes regained title to the land. Ten years later, Emma and George Washington Kennedy, who were formerly enslaved people, bought 455 acres of land that included most of the prison site. In 1890 the Kennedys sold 80 acres, including the prison site, to J.W. Stone and J.D. Crawford. Stone and Crawford sold the land to the Grand Army of the Republic, who transferred ownership to one of their auxiliary organizations, the Women’s Relief Corps (WRC).

The WRC was the first organization concerned with large scale preservation and memorialization of the former prison. They created memorial gardens and a driving route, and encouraged the placement of monuments. They established the site as Andersonville Prison Park. Even after ownership was transferred to the U.S. Army in 1910, the WRC continued to oversee and encourage memorialization of the site, to ensure what had happened there would never be forgotten.

The idea the WRC had for preserving the prison site reached its fulfillment when the grounds became part of the National Park Service in 1970. Andersonville National Historic Site was created by Congress to preserve and memorialize the deadliest ground of the Civil War, and to provide a better understanding of the American prisoner of war story. And so the efforts begun by freed people, the U.S. Army, and the WRC to preserve, honor, and remember the tragedy and sacrifice made at Andersonville continue, over 150 years later, through Andersonville National Historic Site.
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Image: Historic photo of “Andersonville Prison Park” gate over a dirt lane leading into the prison site (Open Parks Network)

Address

496 Cemetery Rd
Andersonville, GA
31711

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00
Saturday 08:00 - 17:00
Sunday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(229) 924-0343

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Sadly, we don’t always know the depths of someone’s depression until it is too late. May I please get 2 friends or family members to copy and re-post? I am trying to demonstrate that someone is always listening. #SuicideAwareness Just two. Any two. Say DONE.
When do you anticipate the POW museum reopening?
I know the significance of leaving coins on military tombstones, but what about stones that also have marble on them?
The following letter was written by Pvt. Otto Kunze of the 82nd Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment (also called the 2nd Hecker Regiment). Private Kunze was a native of Karlsfeld, Prussia, and mustered into service on Sept. 26, 1862 at Camp Butler, Illinois. He was 18 years old at muster in and resided at Belleville, Illinois, prior to enlisting. The 82nd Illinois, a mostly German Regiment, was organized by Col. Friedrich Hecker. The 82nd served in the Eastern theater until late 1863, when it was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland. The letter was published in Chicago’s Illinois Staats-Zeitung on June 7, 1865, and translated into English by Joseph R. Reinhart. Report of Soldier Otto Kunze of the New Hecker Regiment About His Two Years as a Prisoner in the South The Suffering on Belle Island, in Andersonville, etc., etc. I was captured on July 1, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg. I had to remain lying without food in the rear of the Rebel army until July 4. When the Rebel army formed up to retreat on July 4th, I was sent to Richmond [Virginia]. I had to march to Stanton [Staunton?]; I arrived there on the 18th and on the 20th went to Richmond by railroad, arriving there on the 21st. I was placed in the Pemberton building, then taken to Belle Island that is accurately called Hell Island. Now bad times began! In the mornings our rations consisted of a little piece of bread (in the first two months white, then corn bread) and a morsel of beef or pork; and then in the evenings we received nothing more than bean or pea soup and a little bread. This soup was the sort that you considered good, if you got one bean out of two portions. Further, it was seasoned with bugs. We received barely enough food to stay alive. When I stood up I staggered like a drunk. When I slept I dreamt of food being in front of me. When I awakened however I found myself terribly deceived and had nothing but a hungry stomach. I suffered for six weeks from red dysentery and believed I would die, because a prisoner in Secessia can only have medical care if he is half dead. The torment of the cold came with the beginning of the winter. Many poor prisoners froze. Hunger and hypersensitivity to the cold killed many. The Rebels robbed us of our blankets when we were captured. That which had any value to me was taken and even the pictures of my dears. In January 1864 I received the clothing our government sent for us. We really needed it: a large coat, a blanket, a pair of pants, shoes and a cap. On February 17, 1864, I was sent to the to the “Pemberton Building” with a group of other prisoners. On February 18 we were sent away from Richmond without knowing our destination. We learned our destination on the 25th when we arrived 700 strong at Andersonville, Ga. On the journey several of us were hurt when the train derailed. The stockade was not yet finished, however, it was soon made sufficient to hold us. A number of bloodhounds were used there, and such beasts are as effective in the surveillance of prisoners in Rebeldom as a company of soldiers. After the stockade was completed prisoners were sent from all points to Andersonville and the place for prisoners inside the stockade was soon full. Because there were many bad persons among the prisoner—stealing, looting and murders became the order of the day. Of course, the New York scoundrels were so bad that a man with money in his pocket was no longer safe. This lasted until a company of “Regulators” was organized and armed themselves with clubs to arrest these mobs; however, much confusion emerged in the camp through this. We saw shoving and hitting left and right. Finally, with the help of Capt. Werths [Wirz], who had command over us, a large number of these mobs were collected and locked up outside of the stockade. A trial was held and six of them were found guilty of murder. They were sentenced to death. On the 11th of July, a gallows was erected inside of the stockade and in the presence of all the prisoners the six murderers were hanged. That led to calmness and order in the camp. The camp comprised about 25 acres among which were several acres of swampy ground. Inside the stockade and 20 feet from it was a fence made from 3-foot high poles with rails nailed on it. We named this fence the deadline because if a prisoner stepped over it he would be shot down. During the summer of 1864 no prisoner dared to cross the line or to lean over it with any part of his body. Many innocent men were shot down. Some men who were half crazy because of their mistreatment crossed over the line and were shot. Others had the same fate even though they did not cross the line. Take out 3 to 4 acres of mire and the 20 feet within the stockade around the camp’s dead line, and you can easily calculate how much of the 25 acres of the entire camp remained for the prisoners, who numbered approximately 35,000 in the hot months of July and August. A large number of us had no shelter from the sun’s heat, no protection from the chilly night dew. The food was scant and miserable. We ate it raw because there was nothing to cook with and no wood for a fire. Others who were sick could not enjoy such food and they could get nothing better. It consisted of raw cornmeal, in which the corncob and all were ground in it and a little pork. Sometimes we received a few black beans. A healthy person could barely live with such nourishment, much less a sick one. The sick in Andersonville received medical care only when they were half dead. The main illnesses were: the red dysentery and scurvy; although the latter, if one acts in time, can be easily cured; but we received none of the food to counter against it. Many, very many, died of starvation. Others entirely lost their courage and fell into a state of despondency or mental disturbance. I was luckier than many others. We made a shelter with blankets. It granted to us some degree protection against the sun’s heat, rain and night dew. I am not in a position to give an account of all the suffering at Andersonville. And could I depict it, no one would believe the dreadfulness. Only one who has experienced it could know. In September 1864, when Sherman appeared to be moving toward Macon, the Rebels considered it time to remove us from Andersonville. I was with the group that was sent to Savannah on 7th September, where we arrived the next day. We were somewhat better treated there and remained there for over a month. The change of places was good for most of us. On 11th of October we were sent back to Camp Lawton near Millen, 80 to 90 miles from Savannah. It now began to get cold, and a few who thought they would die if they remained prisoners over the winter entered the Rebel army. Some of our sick were sent into the Federal lines by Millen and I still hoped this good fortune would come to all of us. But it was not so! Sherman had begun his new campaign from Atlanta to Savannah. Therefore, on the 21st of November they took us from Millen to Savannah. And from there they transported us on the G[u]lf Railroad farther south and indeed to Blackshire, 90 miles from Savannah. We arrived there on the 24th of November and camped in the woods. On the 1st of December they brought us back to Savannah and it was said we were supposed to be exchanged. The truth was they were taking us to South Carolina. However, the “wild Yankees” (the name the Rebels used for armed Union soldiers) had cut off the route to South Carolina, so we had to return to Blackshire. On the 5 December they took us from there to the hundred-mile distant Thomasville where we arrived on the 6th. We camped in the woods. We had to leave Thomasville on the 19th in order to be transported to Andersonville. We had to march 56 miles until we reached another railroad. The Rebels exhibited their greatest cruelty on this march. We had to march through knee-deep mud and water that could have been easily avoided. Their cruelty did not allow them to treat us humanely—not once toward our sick. Apparently it was their aim to get rid of us without shooting us. On the 25 of December we entered Andersonville again. Yes, a sad Christmas for us who have been abandoned. I was now resigned to it. I tried to forget the world and everything that was important to me. So I lived until March when the news of an impending exchange breathed life into me. Finally, on the 5th of April 1865, we were sent away from Andersonville in order to be exchanged at Jacksonville, Florida. However, we had to halt in Albany to await orders. On the 11 of April we were sent back to Andersonville. On the 17th the Rebels hurried, out of anxiety over the “wild Yankees,” to take us away from Andersonville. The next day they took us to Macon, from there back to Albany. Then we had to march to Thomasville. We were put on a train there and sent to Florida, near the lines of the Federal troops. On the 28th of April we were sent out of the Rebel lines and on the 29th we entered the Union lines. It was my happiest day of my life. I was finally out of the hands of the cruelest barbarians and among the living again.
Good morning! Is the museum opened back up or is it just the outside areas? Thank you!
Hello, are there any updates/ projections on when the museums will reopen?
Hello, is there a projection on when the museums will reopen for full use?
Memorial day at Andersonville Prison Cemetery May 25th 2020
How do we tune into the Memorial Day Ceremony?
Thank you to the staff for looking over my 3ed Great Grandfather. I'm spending a little time with him on the 156th anniversary of his death.