UMass Amherst AfroAm

UMass Amherst AfroAm Established in 1970, we remain one of the largest Africana Studies departments in the world offering BA, MA and PhD degrees. We are named for scholar-activist and native son William Edward Burghardt Du Bois born and raised in Western Massachusetts.

The W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies is one of the largest such departments in the country, comprehensively offering a BA major/minor, MA, and PhD degrees for all students who wish in-depth knowledge of the history and culture of black people in the Americas and the worldwide African Diaspora.

Operating as usual

10/16/2020
National Council for Black Studies

National Council for Black Studies

Legislative Update: President Amilcar Shabazz interviews California Assemblymember Dr. Shirley Weber

Dear AfroAm majors, The deadline for the Chester Davis Scholarship is this upcoming Thursday, October 15th! If you are a...
10/14/2020
Chester Davis Scholarship for AfroAm Majors | W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies | UMass Amherst

Dear AfroAm majors,

The deadline for the Chester Davis Scholarship is this upcoming Thursday, October 15th! If you are a junior or senior and have a 3.0 GPA or higher, please apply! Scholarship is open to both primary and secondary majors.

Full application guidelines and link to application, here: https://www.umass.edu/afroam/news/chester-davis-scholarship-afroam-majors

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to be in touch.

10/14/2020
UMass Amherst

Here it is...

Mark your calendars for October 18-24 and join us for spirited, safe, virtual events as part of #UMassHomecoming @HOME!

Bring your best school spirit, cover your social feed in maroon, and call your friends to celebrate together! 🎉🙌

▶️ View the full schedule and REGISTER NOW!

PAHMUSA-The Pan African Historical Museum USA
10/14/2020

PAHMUSA-The Pan African Historical Museum USA

I would like to thank those of you that came to the International Underground Railroad Event. We had an awesome time, especially seeing the Native American Flag raising...
I would also like to give kudos to the character actors that participated; Janine Fondon (Josephine St Pierre) Maris Furlow (Ida B. Wells) Aprell May (Mary Church Terrell) Gloria May Peeler (Gentle Running Deer) Cynthia St Juste (Sanite Belair) The Mocha Org. and others.
And to the Performers, you did wonderful: Terry Reynolds , Dr Amilcar Shabazz , Bonita Oliver , Amber Peterson , Maurice Taylor.
The African Drummers Winston and Trinny be on the lookout for the next on.... COMING SOON!

CMASS at UMASS
10/10/2020

CMASS at UMASS

Telling OUR Stories: The Latinx Diaspora
Tuesday, October 13, 2020
5:30pm
Zoom link: https://umass-amherst.zoom.us/j/97529272066?pwd=ZFgxa2FtQjBKVlRqYTVETVFlbEZUUT09

Please join our panelists as they share their stories and discuss the history of the Latinx Diaspora and Indigenous people.

Guest Speakers: Ellen Correa, Lecturer Civic Engagement & Service Learning (CESL) and Isabel Espinal, Reference Services Librarian for Afro American Studies, Native American Indian Studies and Information Literacy and Agustin Lao Montes, Associate Professor of Sociology and Afro-American Studies

10/09/2020
National Council for Black Studies

National Council for Black Studies

This episode in the Democracy Unchained conversation series faces the topic of America’s original sin of slavery and discusses reparations for Black Americans as an important part of rebuilding democracy in the U.S. Bakari Kitwana talks with Rev. Dr. Liz Theoharris, Poor People's Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival co-chair; Dr. Amilcar Shabazz, NCBS President & UMass Amherst AfroAm Professor; Deadria Farmer-Paellman, Executive Director, Restitution Study Group; Betty Lyons, President and Executive Director, American Indian Law Alliance; and, Dr. Ron Daniels, Convener, National African American Reparations Commission - NAARC.

May all be safe and those that are sick have a speedy recovery
10/07/2020
UMass COVID cases rising steadily

May all be safe and those that are sick have a speedy recovery

AMHERST — COVID-19 cases at the University of Massachusetts continued to climb over the weekend, with the university reporting 23 more over the weekend.That brings to 121 the number of those connected with UMass who have tested positive since Aug. 6....

10/02/2020
Difficult Dialogues TV

Difficult Dialogues TV

Today, 4PM EST, join us live for our 1st Friday Reparations Dialogue mobilizing awareness of state-level reparations work. Invited guests include California Assemblymember Dr. Shirley Weber who just won a huge victory in passing the 1st state reparations law! Also, Massachusetts Senator Jo Comerford and Representative Bud L. Williams, State Representative Mindy Domb and former representative Ben Swan will talk about what's happening in the Bay State. Please share to your networks this live event. #ReparationsNow

#WEBDDAFRO PROUD!
09/26/2020

#WEBDDAFRO PROUD!

W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies  Meet & Greet for Majors, Secondary Majors and Minors When: Thursday,...
09/24/2020

W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies
Meet & Greet for Majors, Secondary Majors and Minors
When: Thursday, September 24th at 5:00 p.m.
Where: Via Zoom at https://umass-amherst.zoom.us/j/96919388099
We hope you will join us - all are welcome!

09/23/2020
NowThis Politics

Each One, Teach One!

This activist stood up to a school board member who publicly defended Robert E. Lee and claimed the Confederate general was a freer of slaves

“Imperiled”Early to jail, early to dieHold your groundPrivilege belieToo many boundIncarceration is their fateBlack on b...
09/23/2020
Learn about Harry Seymour and his artistic journey!

“Imperiled”
Early to jail, early to die
Hold your ground
Privilege belie
Too many bound
Incarceration is their fate
Black on black won’t abate
Stop and frisk
Need to pray
For those at risk
Imperiled are they
-Harry Seymour

How do you blend a unique art style with meaningful messaging? Let Martha's Vineyard based artist Harry Seymour show you!

#WEBDDAFRO is 50! Forget those COVID-19 Blues & be Golden with us!
09/17/2020
W.E.B. Du Bois Department 50th Anniversary Symposium

#WEBDDAFRO is 50! Forget those COVID-19 Blues & be Golden with us!

W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies 50th Anniversary Virtual Symposium Conscious to Woke: Fifty Years of Revolutionary Black Thought

UMass Amherst AfroAm's cover photo
09/17/2020

UMass Amherst AfroAm's cover photo

We mourn the passing of our colleague Gilbert McCauley’s mother
09/16/2020
Mary McCauley Obituary - Springfield, VA

We mourn the passing of our colleague Gilbert McCauley’s mother

Celebrate the life of Mary McCauley, leave a kind word or memory and get funeral service information care of Demaine Funeral Home.

Five colleges report collective total of 20 confirmed COVID-19 cases
09/15/2020
Five colleges report collective total of 20 confirmed COVID-19 cases

Five colleges report collective total of 20 confirmed COVID-19 cases

AMHERST — As colleges and universities around the country bring students back to campus with varying degrees of success, confirmed cases of COVID-19 at the Five Colleges have remained relatively low so far.According to data released by the colleges,...

Amilcar Shabazz, School Equity Task Force member
09/11/2020

Amilcar Shabazz, School Equity Task Force member

Benefit for Coach Patrick "Piggo" Dawes. Patrick was diagnosed with cancer two years ago and suffered a stroke last year. “Coaching his Golf Children is his pride and joy. His goal is to help them excel on or off the course. Patrick was always there coaching during his illness and treatments, even on days when he was too weak to stand up, but he never wavered.” Georgia Malcolm cooks!

Listen Up! #Uprising2020 #BeRevolutionary #DareToStruggle
09/11/2020
Gazette UMass Coverage

Listen Up! #Uprising2020 #BeRevolutionary #DareToStruggle

“I was all in and I couldn’t have been prouder of him because he did that on his own,” UMass coach Matt McCall said during a virtual press conference Wednesday. “You have to give your players a platform and a voice to speak and to speak exactly to how they’re feeling. There are times when I have to just be quiet and listen.”

Thank you to the movement awakened by the unjustified deaths and attacks that has finally softened the hearts of folks i...
09/10/2020
In embrace of W.E.B. Du Bois, Great Barrington names middle school after the civil rights icon - The Boston Globe

Thank you to the movement awakened by the unjustified deaths and attacks that has finally softened the hearts of folks in Du Bois’ hometown

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/09/04/metro/embrace-web-du-bois-great-barrington-names-middle-school-after-civil-rights-icon/?s_campaign=breakingnews:newsletter

In embrace of W.E.B. Du Bois, Great Barrington names middle school after the civil rights icon

By Deanna Pan Globe Staff, Updated September 4, 2020, 7:44 p.m.

Gwendolyn VanSant (right) and Randy Weinstein of the W.E.B. Du Bois Legacy Committee stood outside the newly renamed W.E.B. Du Bois Middle School in Great Barrington on Friday.Matthew Cavanaugh/For The Boston Globe

“To me, in this moment of ’Black Lives Matter,’ this was the action, right? We can put a lot of words up and hold signs, but this was a clear action that would stand for what I see as reparations in Great Barrington for past community hurts,” said Gwendolyn VanSant, CEO and founding director of BRIDGE, a Berkshire-based nonprofit that provides cultural literacy and competency training.

In 2004, following the construction of a pair of brand-new elementary and middle schools, a bitter debate, which garnered widespread media attention, splintered the town of Great Barrington, according to the Berkshire Eagle, after historian Bernard Drew suggested naming one of the buildings after Du Bois, who was born in Great Barrington in 1868 and became the first Black man to earn a doctorate at Harvard in 1895. Opposition to the idea, led by local veterans, centered on Du Bois’ embrace of socialist politics late in life. In the 1950s, Du Bois eulogized Joseph Stalin and met with Mao Zedong. In 1961, at the age of 93, he joined the Communist Party.

“Back in 2004, in this community, it seems there was an ’us’ versus a ’them.’ ‘Them’ being the town itself and ‘us’ being the DuBoisians,” said Randy Weinstein, founder of the Du Bois Center at Great Barrington, which abuts the Mahaiwe Cemetery, where Du Bois buried his son, daughter, and first wife. “Our town was polarized... and neither side was going to give an inch.”

At the time, according to School Committee chairman Stephen Bannon, the committee had already made the decision not to name the buildings after any person, living or dead. The schools were named after the surrounding geography instead.

But the controversy still stung Du Bois’s supporters, who felt the movement opposing Du Bois was steeped in racial bias. Great Barrington, with a population of less than 7,000 people, is nearly 88 percent white, according to Census data and roughly 4 percent Black.

“We know Du Bois is a global icon. We know of the trailblazing he did and how he broke ground with the NAACP and Harvard and everywhere else,” VanSant said. “All these truths are known and it’s still not good enough because of his communism and it’s like, people didn’t have the curiosity or the care to look into that or probe that or understand it better.”

Behind the scenes, VanSant, Weinstein, and others worked tirelessly to champion Du Bois.

Their efforts led to the formation of the town’s W.E.B. Du Bois Legacy Committee, which Weinstein chairs, and a public celebration of Du Bois’s 150th birthday in 2018. Last year, they brought their campaign to rename the middle school after Du Bois to the three towns that make up the school district — Great Barrington, Stockbridge, and West Stockbridge — and voters in all three approved.

VanSant was confident their advocacy would pay off at the School Committee meeting on Thursday. But earlier this week, she got wind of a petition with more than 250 signatures that urged the committee to oppose the name change.

On Wednesday evening, she fired off dozens of e-mails and social media messages to her network of friends and activists, asking them to write to the School Committee with their support. By Thursday, the committee had received more than 350 e-mails from community members, almost all in favor of renaming the school for Du Bois.

The School Committee meeting Thursday was unlike any in recent memory, according to district superintendent Peter Dillon. And not only because it was held over Zoom, with more than 200 people logging in to watch or participate.

“People spoke honestly and from the heart,” Dillon said. “I really think that meeting was remarkable and there were people on all sides of it, and folks on different sides made different kinds of arguments.”

“Small-town, New England-type town-meeting democracy, when it works, it’s extraordinary,” he continued, “and I think it really worked the other day.”

To VanSant, the School Committee’s decision was a proud moment in Great Barrington’s history, especially for the town’s children of color.

“Symbols means a lot,” she said. “Every day, that school will carry that name. Every piece of letterhead. Every child will say it. So there won’t be any more children going to the district, wondering if their identities are valued because there’s this icon they’re actually now appreciating instead of people stumbling upon it in college after they’ve left the area.

“It’s just a huge affirmation of belonging,” she said.

Deanna Pan can be reached at [email protected]. Follow her on Twitter @DDpan.

At the end of a two-and-a-half-hour Zoom meeting — in which dozens testified, mostly in favor of the proposed change — the Berkshire Hills Regional School District committee voted unanimously Thursday evening to rename the local middle school in honor of Great Barrington’s best-known native so...

Coming up...
09/08/2020

Coming up...

AMHERST LEAGUE'S ANNUAL OPENING MEETING SET FOR SEPT. 17, UMASS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TRACI PARKER WILL SPEAK

On behalf of the League of Women Voters of Amherst's Steering Committee and newly-formed Racial Justice Task Force, the League would like to invite you to the annual Opening Meeting, to be held via Zoom on Thursday, Sept. 17, from 7 to 8:30 pm.
The speaker will be Traci Parker, Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies at the UMass, whose subject will be "Race, Gender and Voting in the Age of Trump."
Parker teaches African American women's history, nineteenth and twentieth century U.S. history, race and racism, in addition to courses on class, labor and capitalism. She holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Chicago.
Parker is the author of "Department Stores and the Black Freedom Movement: Workers, Consumers, and Civil Rights," and is at work on her second book.
Amid the upswing in racist acts around the country, Prof. Parker's perspective will be welcome, and will help inform our work in moving toward racial justice.
To register in advance for this webinar, please go to:https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_J9eLnFwgRpuL8ReRXNi9QQ
After registering, you will receive a confirmation email with information on how to join the webinar. (A link to a meeting recording will also be available to all registrants.)
The LWVA hopes to see you at Opening Meeting!

National Council for Black Studies
08/22/2020
National Council for Black Studies

National Council for Black Studies

Join NCBS in this important moment of reflection on #Uprising2020 with Melina Abdullah, Black Lives Matter/LA & Prof. of Pan-African Studies at California State L.A.; Rose Brewer, People's Strike coalition & University of Minnesota Distinguished Teaching Professor of African American & African Studies; Andrea Jenkins, Minneapolis City Council Vice-President & first Black openly transgender woman elected to U.S. public office; and Dequi Kioni-sadiki, Malcolm X Commemoration Committee Chair & co-editor of Look for Me in the Whirlwind: From the Panther 21 to 21st Century Revolutions (PM Press, 2017).

See you in zoomland for a most critical and urgent discussion. Let's go.
08/14/2020

See you in zoomland for a most critical and urgent discussion. Let's go.

Transformative Justice:
Ending Incarceration of Women and the Case for Reparations
with @andrea.james.336 and Prof @amilcar.shabazz
Monday 7pm
https://buff.ly/3fSMcSK

Address

180 Infirmary Way
Amherst, MA
01003

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(413) 545-2751

Alerts

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Videos

Our Story

The W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies was officially established in 1970, and has grown to become one of the largest Africana Studies departments in the country. We offer BA, MA, and PhD degrees for all students who wish in-depth knowledge of the history and culture of black people in the Americas and the worldwide African Diaspora. We are located on the campus of the University of Massachusetts in New Africa House. From its beginning our department has been named for the scholar-activist William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (/duːˈbɔɪs/ doo-BOYSS;[1][2] February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963), the sociologist, socialist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, writer and editor. Born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts in the western part of the Bay State, Du Bois attended Fisk University, and went on to complete graduate work at the University of Berlin and Harvard, where he was the first African American to earn a doctorate. He became a professor of history, sociology and economics at Atlanta University and was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.

Du Bois is buried in Ghana, where he died on August 27, 1963, in the capital of Accra at the age of 95. The following day, at the March on Washington, speaker Roy Wilkins asked the hundreds of thousands of marchers to honor Du Bois with a moment of silence. The Civil Rights Act of 1964, embodying many of the reforms Du Bois had campaigned for his entire life, was enacted almost a year after his death.

Ghanaian president Kwame Nkrumah gave Du Bois a state funeral and his former home has been dedicated the W. E. B. Du Bois Memorial Centre for Pan African Culture in his memory. The UMass library is named for Du Bois and holds his collected papers. The department counts among its former faculty his wife Shirley Graham Du Bois, who worked here before she died in 1977; as well as his stepson David Graham Du Bois. Over the years we have been part of the stewardship of his boyhood homesite just outside of his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.


Comments

The forthcoming (December 2020) Columbia University Press publication of "Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927" (https://cup.columbia.edu/book/hubert-harrison/9780231182638 ) follows "Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918" ( https://cup.columbia.edu/book/hubert-harrison/9780231139113 ). This two-volume biography by Jeffrey B. Perry (www.jeffreybperry.net ), based on extensive use of the Hubert H. Harrison Papers and diary, is believed to be the first full-life, multi-volume, biography of an Afro-Caribbean, and only the fourth of an African American after those of Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Langston Hughes. The St. Croix-born, Harlem-based Hubert Harrison (1883-1927) was a brilliant writer, orator, educator, critic, and activist who combined class consciousness and anti-white-supremacist race consciousness, internationalism, and struggle for equality into a potent political radicalism. Harrison's ideas profoundly influenced "New Negro" militants, including A. Philip Randolph and Marcus Garvey, and his work is a key link in the two great strands of the Civil Rights/Black Liberation struggle: the labor- and civil-rights movement associated with Randolph and Martin Luther King Jr. and the race and nationalist movement associated with Garvey and Malcolm X. The second volume of this acclaimed ( https://www.jeffreybperry.net/disc.htm ) biography traces the final decade of Harrison's life, from 1918 to 1927. It details Harrison's literary and political activities, foregrounding his efforts against white supremacy and for racial consciousness and unity in struggles for equality and radical social change. The book explores Harrison's role in the militant “New Negro Movement” and with the International Colored Unity League, as well as his prolific work as a writer, educator for the New York City Board of Education, and editor of the New Negro and the Negro World. It also examines his interactions with major figures such as Garvey, Randolph, Du Bois, Cyril Briggs, W. A Domingo, Richard B. Moore, Claude McKay, John E. Bruce, J. A. Rogers, Eugene O’Neill, Elizabeth Hendrickson, D. Hamilton Jackson, Rothschild Francis, Casper Holstein, Alain Leroy Locke, Amy Ashwood Garvey, Augusta Savage, William Pickens, Willis Huggins, Williana Jones Burroughs, Arthur Schomburg, and other prominent individuals and organizations as he agitated, educated, wrote and organized for democracy and equality from a race-conscious, radical internationalist perspective. This biography demonstrates how Harrison's life and work continue to offer profound insights on race, class, war, religion, literature, theatre, immigration, democracy, and social change in America. These two volumes can be ordered from Columbia University Press at 20% discount by using Code “CUP20”. Please share this information with others and please encourage your public library and your college and/or university library to include the Harrison biography in their collections so current and future generations can learn from the life of Hubert Harrison.
This video presentation on Theodore W. Allen’s “The Invention of the White Race” just passed 160,000 views. People are strongly encouraged to take time with it (the focus on Allen and his work runs from 9:30 to 1:24:23). You can stop it anywhere and come back later) and share it with others. PLEASE SHARE THIS WITH OTHERS. See https://youtu.be/2Gq77rOuZck SPECIAL SALE –30% off paperback (with free ebook) from Verso Books of Theodore W. Allen’s “The Invention of the White Race” Vol. 2 "The Origin of Racial Oppression in Anglo America" (expanded with new introductions and study guide) https://www.versobooks.com/books/1048-the-invention-of-the-white-race-volume-2 See also https://www.jeffreybperry.net/6__the_invention_of_the_br_white_race__b___font___font___i__br_volume_2__br__i_th_116387.htm For an in-depth treatment of the development of the work of Theodore W. Allen see “The Developing Conjuncture and Some Insights From Hubert Harrison and Theodore W. Allen on the Centrality of the Fight Against White Supremacy” in PDF format at the TOP LEFT at http://www.jeffreybperry.net (on Allen see pp. 1-5, 8-12, 30-115) See also https://www.jeffreybperry.net/4__theodore_w__allen_br___b___font___font___center__86151.htm Theodore W. Allen’s Papers have been placed at the UMass – Amherst Archives where they are currently being processed with much planned digitization and will stand along with the Papers of W.E.B. Du Bois and others. See the preliminary posting here -- http://scua.library.umass.edu/umarmot/allen-theodore-w-1919-2005/ For information on Allen’s “The Invention of the White Race” Volume I: “Racial Oppression and Social Control" (expanded with new introductions and study guide) See https://www.jeffreybperry.net/5__the_invention_of_the_br_white_race__b___font___font___i__br_volume_1__br__i_ra_116386.htm For information on the forthcoming Jeffrey B. Perry, “Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927” see https://cup.columbia.edu/book/hubert-harrison/9780231182638 where the book can be ordered from Columbia University Press at a 20% discount by using coupon code CUP20
April 27th Marks the 137th Anniversary of the Birth of Hubert Harrison the “Father of Harlem Radicalism,” Founder of the First Organization and First Newspaper of the Militant “New Negro Movement,” and “Radical Internationalist.” St Croix-born, Harlem-based Hubert H. Harrison (April 27, 1883-December 17, 1927) was a brilliant writer, orator, educator, critic, and radical political activist. Interest in his life and work continues to grow. For comments from scholars and activists on "Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918" (Columbia University Press) see http://www.jeffreybperry.net/disc.htm and see https://www.jeffreybperry.net/bio.htm For information on "A Hubert Harrison Reader" (Wesleyan University Press) see https://www.jeffreybperry.net/2___i_a_hubert_harrison_reader__i___b___font___font___center__86148.htm and to order the book see https://www.hfsbooks.com/books/a-hubert-harrison-reader-harrison-perry/ For information on the new, Diasporic Africa Press expanded edition of Hubert H. Harrison's “When Africa Awakes: The 'Inside Story’ of the Stirrings and Strivings of the New Negro in the Western World” and to purchase the book see https://dafricapress.com/When-Africa-Awakes-The-Inside-Story-of-the-Stirrings-and-Strivings-of-the-New-Negro-in-the-Western-World-p56608720? For a video of a Slide Presentation/Talk on Hubert Harrison see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heBKm1ytd5Q For articles, audios, and videos by and about Hubert Harrison see https://www.jeffreybperry.net/3__hubert_harrison_br___b___font___font___center__86150.htm For a link to the Hubert H. Harrison Papers Digital Collection online at Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library see https://dlc.library.columbia.edu/sites/hubert_h_harrison For a Finding Aid to the Hubert Harrison Papers at Columbia University’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library seehttp://www.columbia.edu/cu/libraries/inside/projects/findingaids/scans/pdfs/Harrison_Hubert_H.pdf For information on the forthcoming “Hubert Harrison: The Struggle for Equality, 1918-1927” that will be available later this year see http://cup.columbia.edu/book/hubert-harrison/9780231182638
#WEBDDAFRO alumni news
UMASS Afro-Am alum Dr. Kabria Baumgartner named a 2020 Emerging Scholar by Diverse: Issues In Higher Education
Posted by my friend Taj Smith, a UMass Amherst alum. Please share!
#AfricanaStudiesToday is a new project that Demetria Shabazz & I are excited to launch in 2020. This inaugural episode was taped in the Underground Theater
I attended Professor Femi Richards’ remembrance event in Harlem, NY yesterday, August 4 . I happily represented #UMassAmherstAfroAm. I spoke about what he meant to students, both graduate and undergraduate. I also spoke about what he meant to me as a friend and mentor for the past twenty-three years. It was he who taught me how to be an academic. The occasion was a bittersweet. However, I think Professor Richards would be pleased to know so many people appreciated, admired and loved him in life. #FatherOfHundreds #WEBDDAFRO
I attended Professor Femi Richards’ remembrance event in Harlem, NY yesterday, August 4 . I happily represented #UMassAmherstAfroAm. I spoke about what he meant to students, both graduate and undergraduate. I also spoke about what he meant to me as a friend and mentor for the past twenty-three years. It was he who taught me how to be an academic. The occasion was a bittersweet. However, I think Professor Richards would be pleased to know so many people appreciated, admired and loved him in life. #FatherOfHundreds #WEBDDAFRO
William Edward Burghardt Du Bois. Harlem In Color Photographs by Carl Van Vechten. Courtesy of the Carl Van Vechten Trust/Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Yale University.
The full program for #CLPP2019 is now online! Register now to attend workshops on topics including sex work, immigrant justice, white supremacy, queering RJ, clinics and abortion access, youth activism, funding, environmental justice, & so much more! https://www.facebook.com/events/335415310309473/
Dear friends and colleagues, join us tomorrow @ Smith College for this great opportunity with Dr. Samuel Kelton Roberts.