Military Specialties War Museum

Military Specialties War  Museum Militay museum dedicated to preserving military history from around the world both foreign and domestic.
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06/06/2020
It's been awile sence our last update. We are still pushing forward continuing the remodeling and new security setup. Re...
02/02/2020

It's been awile sence our last update. We are still pushing forward continuing the remodeling and new security setup. Recently we did receive some much needed mannequins. Here are a few we have set up already.

12/07/2019
11/28/2019
11/11/2019
06/06/2019
05/26/2019
Today marks the 74th anniversary of Victory in Europe.
05/08/2019

Today marks the 74th anniversary of Victory in Europe.

Photos from Military Specialties War  Museum's post
05/02/2019

Photos from Military Specialties War Museum's post

05/02/2019
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04/24/2019

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Helen Cooke touches the casket of her late husband Pfc. Cecil E. Harris, a WWII soldier who was killed in action in France in 1945 and found more than 70 years after his death. She waited for him all this time... 🇺🇸

Harris was a 19-year-old private first class in the Army's 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, when his rifle platoon came under heavy fire from German troops in Dambach, France, on the second day of 1945 resulting in his untimely death. After his remains and dog tag were discovered by French farmers, they were brought back to the United States and he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Rest In Peace, hero. 🇺🇸

#WWIIVHP #TravelingMuseumofWWII #History #WWII #Soldier #Funeral #France #Veteran #Military #Hero #PurpleHeart #KilledInAction #Memory #45thInfantryDivision #Honor #Respect #FootstepsResearchers

Happy and safe holiday to all
04/21/2019

Happy and safe holiday to all

On this day April 21st 1918, Manfred von Richthofen, German World War I flying ace known as "The Red Baron," was killed ...
04/21/2019

On this day April 21st 1918, Manfred von Richthofen, German World War I flying ace known as "The Red Baron," was killed by Allied fire over Vaux-sur-Somme, France.

04/15/2019
https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/
04/13/2019

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/

R.V. Burgin, the Marine whose book inspired HBO's 'The Pacific,' dies at 96
Associated Press, April 12, 2019

LANCASTER, Texas (AP) — A Marine whose book about grueling jungle combat during WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific” has died at his home in Texas. Services are being held Friday for R.V. Burgin. His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, says her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6.

Burgin wrote the book, “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd says it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann.

Shepherd says her father for about 35 years never talked about his service in the war. She says he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions. Burgin lived in Lancaster, a Dallas suburb.

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/
04/13/2019

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/

R.V. Burgin, the Marine whose book inspired HBO's 'The Pacific,' dies at 96
Associated Press, April 12, 2019

LANCASTER, Texas (AP) — A Marine whose book about grueling jungle combat during WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific” has died at his home in Texas. Services are being held Friday for R.V. Burgin. His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, says her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6.

Burgin wrote the book, “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd says it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann.

Shepherd says her father for about 35 years never talked about his service in the war. She says he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions. Burgin lived in Lancaster, a Dallas suburb.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2397914910233040&id=299662973391588
02/04/2019

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On this day in 1944, American forces invaded and took control of the Marshall Islands, long occupied by the Japanese and used by them as a base for military operations.

The Marshalls, east of the Caroline Islands in the western Pacific Ocean, had been in Japanese hands since World War I. Occupied by the Japanese in 1914, they were made part of the “Japanese Mandated Islands” as determined by the League of Nations. The Treaty of Versailles, which concluded the First World War, stipulated certain islands formerly controlled by Germany–including the Marshalls, the Carolines, and the Marianas (except Guam)–had to be ceded to the Japanese, though “overseen” by the League. But the Japanese withdrew from the League in 1933 and began transforming the Mandated Islands into military bases. Non-Japanese, including Christian missionaries, were kept from the islands as naval and air bases–meant to threaten shipping lanes between Australia and Hawaii–were constructed.

During the Second World War, these islands, as well as others in the vicinity, became targets of Allied attacks. The U.S. Central Pacific Campaign began with the Gilbert Islands, south of the Mandated Islands; U.S. forces conquered the Gilberts in November 1943. Next on the agenda was Operation Flintlock, a plan to capture the Marshall Islands.

Adm. Raymond Spruance led the 5th Fleet from Pearl Harbor on January 22, 1944, to the Marshalls, with the goal of getting 53,000 assault troops ashore two islets: Roi and Namur. Meanwhile, using the Gilberts as an air base, American planes bombed the Japanese administrative and communications center for the Marshalls, which was located on Kwajalein, an atoll that was part of the Marshall cluster of atolls, islets, and reefs.

By January 31, Kwajalein was devastated. Repeated carrier- and land-based air raids destroyed every Japanese airplane on the Marshalls. By February 3, U.S. infantry overran Roi and Namur atolls. The Marshalls were then effectively in American hands–with the loss of only 400 American lives.

PHOTO: Americans landing on Carlos Island, Marshall Islands, circa early Feb 1944.

#WWII #WW2 #OnThisDay #OTD #History

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12/17/2018

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On this day in 1944, with the Anglo-Americans closing in on Germany from the west and the Soviets approaching from the east, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler ordered a massive attack against the western Allies by three German armies, thus beginning the Battle of the Bulge.

The German counterattack out of the densely wooded Ardennes region of Belgium took the Allies entirely by surprise, and the experienced German troops wrought havoc on the American line, creating a triangular “bulge” 60 miles deep and 50 miles wide along the Allied front. Conditions of fog and mist prevented the unleashing of Allied air superiority, and for several days Hitler’s desperate gamble seemed to be paying off. However, unlike the French in 1940, the embattled Americans kept up a fierce resistance even after their lines of communication had been broken, buying time for a three-point counteroffensive led by British General Bernard Montgomery and American generals Omar Bradley and George Patton.

Fighting was particularly fierce at the town of Bastogne, where the 101st Airborne Division and part of the 10th Armored Division were encircled by German forces within the bulge. On December 22, the German commander besieging the town demanded that the Americans surrender or face annihilation. U.S. Major General Anthony McAuliffe prepared a typed reply that read simply:

To the German Commander:

Nuts!

From the American Commander

The Americans who delivered the message explained to the perplexed Germans that the one-word reply was translatable as “Go to hell!” Heavy fighting continued at Bastogne, but the 101st held on.

On December 23, the skies finally cleared over the battle areas, and the Allied air forces inflicted heavy damage on German tanks and transport, which were jammed solidly along the main roads. On December 26, Bastogne was relieved by elements of General Patton’s 3rd Army. A major Allied counteroffensive began at the end of December, and by January 21 the Germans had been pushed back to their original line.

Germany’s last major offensive of the war had cost them 120,000 men, 1,600 planes, and 700 tanks. The Allies suffered some 80,000 killed, wounded, or missing in action, with all but 5,000 of these casualties being American. It was the heaviest single battle toll in U.S. history.

#WWII #WW2 #OnThisDay #OTD #History #GreatestGeneration #NeverForget #NeverForgotten #ThankYou

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12/10/2018

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On this day in 1941, Cleveland Indians pitching great Bob Feller enlisted in the U.S. Navy, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.

Feller heard about the bombing while returning from a visit to his terminally ill father at Des Moines to Chicago where he was to sign a new Indians contract. Two days later, he volunteered for the U.S. Navy, becoming the first American professional athlete to enlist. Originally he tried to enlist as a fighter pilot but failed hearing tests. Feller attended basic training at Norfolk Naval Base and served as a physical fitness instructor there. He also pitched in baseball games hosted by the military.

Although he had received a military exemption owing to his father's failing health, he wanted to serve in combat missions. Feller said, "I told them I wanted to ... get into combat; wanted to do something besides standing around handing out balls and bats and making ball fields out of coral reefs." Feller was assigned to the USS Alabama; he had hoped to serve on the USS Iowa, but nearly all servicemen from Iowa had requested a place on that ship, and Feller was not selected.

Shortly before Feller left for combat, his father died of brain cancer in early January 1943. Feller returned to service as Gun Captain aboard the Alabama and kept his pitching arm in shape by throwing near a gun turret. Feller and the Alabama crew spent most of 1943 in the British Isles along with USS South Dakota, but in August were reassigned to the Pacific Theater of Operations.

Feller's first taste of direct combat was at Operation Galvanic in November 1943. The Alabama also served during Operation Flintlock while primarily being used as an escort battleship in 1944. Feller participated in the Battle of the Philippine Sea before his combat duty ended in January 1945; he spent the rest of the war at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station as an instructor.

When the war ended, Feller was discharged as a Chief Petty Officer on August 22, 1945. Feller was decorated with six campaign ribbons and eight battle stars while serving on missions in both the Pacific and North Atlantic, and he was made an honorary member of the Green Berets later in life.

During the war, Feller pitched for the Norfolk Naval Station's Bluejackets baseball team, which in 1942 went 92-8, and later for the Naval Station Great Lakes team.

In the period from early spring 1945 to late summer 1945, Feller's naval duties were again at Great Lakes Naval station, where he replaced Mickey Cochrane as manager of the baseball program, as well as an active pitcher for the team.

Upon arrival in Cleveland after his discharge, Feller was honored with a civic luncheon on August 24, 1945, with more than 1,000 people in attendance at the Carter Hotel. Feller said to the crowd: "The real heroes didn't come home."

Later that day, the city held a parade and Feller was the starting pitcher in the Indians' game against the Detroit Tigers. Feller allowed four hits in the game and earned a win in the Indians' 4–2 victory. "I was so tired from all the receptions I didn't know if I could finish the game", Feller said. For the 1945 season, he appeared in nine games and notched a 5–3 record with 59 strikeouts and 2.50 ERA.

#WWII #WW2 #OnThisDay #OTD #History #ClevelandIdians #Baseball #MLB #USNavy #ThankYou #GreatestGeneration MLB

12/07/2018
11/23/2018
Its been 100 years sence the 11th Hour of the 11th day of the 11th month when the guns fell silent. Never forget the sac...
11/11/2018

Its been 100 years sence the 11th Hour of the 11th day of the 11th month when the guns fell silent. Never forget the sacrifice of the generations before you.

11/11/2018
11/11/2018

We wish everyone a happy Veterans Day and thank all that have served. Unfortunately due to ongoing repairs there will not be a display this veterans day.

Address

1301 17th St
Altoona, PA
16601

Telephone

(814) 615-9521

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