Military Specialties War Museum

Military Specialties War  Museum Militay museum dedicated to preserving military history from around the world both foreign and domestic.

06/06/2019
05/26/2019
Today marks the 74th anniversary of Victory in Europe.
05/08/2019

Today marks the 74th anniversary of Victory in Europe.

Photos from Military Specialties War  Museum's post
05/02/2019

Photos from Military Specialties War Museum's post

05/02/2019
https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2316097531937249&id=1671839809696361
04/24/2019

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2316097531937249&id=1671839809696361

Helen Cooke touches the casket of her late husband Pfc. Cecil E. Harris, a WWII soldier who was killed in action in France in 1945 and found more than 70 years after his death. She waited for him all this time... 🇺🇸

Harris was a 19-year-old private first class in the Army's 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, when his rifle platoon came under heavy fire from German troops in Dambach, France, on the second day of 1945 resulting in his untimely death. After his remains and dog tag were discovered by French farmers, they were brought back to the United States and he is buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

Rest In Peace, hero. 🇺🇸

#WWIIVHP #TravelingMuseumofWWII #History #WWII #Soldier #Funeral #France #Veteran #Military #Hero #PurpleHeart #KilledInAction #Memory #45thInfantryDivision #Honor #Respect #FootstepsResearchers

Happy and safe holiday to all
04/21/2019

Happy and safe holiday to all

On this day April 21st 1918, Manfred von Richthofen, German World War I flying ace known as "The Red Baron," was killed ...
04/21/2019

On this day April 21st 1918, Manfred von Richthofen, German World War I flying ace known as "The Red Baron," was killed by Allied fire over Vaux-sur-Somme, France.

04/15/2019
https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/
04/13/2019

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/

R.V. Burgin, the Marine whose book inspired HBO's 'The Pacific,' dies at 96
Associated Press, April 12, 2019

LANCASTER, Texas (AP) — A Marine whose book about grueling jungle combat during WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific” has died at his home in Texas. Services are being held Friday for R.V. Burgin. His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, says her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6.

Burgin wrote the book, “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd says it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann.

Shepherd says her father for about 35 years never talked about his service in the war. She says he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions. Burgin lived in Lancaster, a Dallas suburb.

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/
04/13/2019

https://www.facebook.com/677951198958010/posts/2180765252009923/

R.V. Burgin, the Marine whose book inspired HBO's 'The Pacific,' dies at 96
Associated Press, April 12, 2019

LANCASTER, Texas (AP) — A Marine whose book about grueling jungle combat during WWII became a basis for the HBO miniseries “The Pacific” has died at his home in Texas. Services are being held Friday for R.V. Burgin. His daughter, Maggie Shepherd, says her father was 96 when he died in his sleep on April 6.

Burgin wrote the book, “Islands of the Damned: A Marine at War in the Pacific.” Shepherd says it was among several books that inspired the HBO miniseries that premiered in 2010. Burgin was portrayed in the miniseries by actor Martin McCann.

Shepherd says her father for about 35 years never talked about his service in the war. She says he was inspired to write a book after attending some military reunions. Burgin lived in Lancaster, a Dallas suburb.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2397914910233040&id=299662973391588
02/04/2019

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2397914910233040&id=299662973391588

On this day in 1944, American forces invaded and took control of the Marshall Islands, long occupied by the Japanese and used by them as a base for military operations.

The Marshalls, east of the Caroline Islands in the western Pacific Ocean, had been in Japanese hands since World War I. Occupied by the Japanese in 1914, they were made part of the “Japanese Mandated Islands” as determined by the League of Nations. The Treaty of Versailles, which concluded the First World War, stipulated certain islands formerly controlled by Germany–including the Marshalls, the Carolines, and the Marianas (except Guam)–had to be ceded to the Japanese, though “overseen” by the League. But the Japanese withdrew from the League in 1933 and began transforming the Mandated Islands into military bases. Non-Japanese, including Christian missionaries, were kept from the islands as naval and air bases–meant to threaten shipping lanes between Australia and Hawaii–were constructed.

During the Second World War, these islands, as well as others in the vicinity, became targets of Allied attacks. The U.S. Central Pacific Campaign began with the Gilbert Islands, south of the Mandated Islands; U.S. forces conquered the Gilberts in November 1943. Next on the agenda was Operation Flintlock, a plan to capture the Marshall Islands.

Adm. Raymond Spruance led the 5th Fleet from Pearl Harbor on January 22, 1944, to the Marshalls, with the goal of getting 53,000 assault troops ashore two islets: Roi and Namur. Meanwhile, using the Gilberts as an air base, American planes bombed the Japanese administrative and communications center for the Marshalls, which was located on Kwajalein, an atoll that was part of the Marshall cluster of atolls, islets, and reefs.

By January 31, Kwajalein was devastated. Repeated carrier- and land-based air raids destroyed every Japanese airplane on the Marshalls. By February 3, U.S. infantry overran Roi and Namur atolls. The Marshalls were then effectively in American hands–with the loss of only 400 American lives.

PHOTO: Americans landing on Carlos Island, Marshall Islands, circa early Feb 1944.

#WWII #WW2 #OnThisDay #OTD #History

11/11/2018
11/11/2018

We wish everyone a happy Veterans Day and thank all that have served. Unfortunately due to ongoing repairs there will not be a display this veterans day.

https://www.facebook.com/100010204245181/posts/714803358869799/
09/14/2018

https://www.facebook.com/100010204245181/posts/714803358869799/

Charles E. Kelly of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was a Technical Sergeant in the U.S. Army and a recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II on this day in 1943.

Prior to his military service, Kelly made his living with a street gang and frequently got into trouble with the law. He joined the Army in May 1942 and by September 13th, 1943 was serving as a corporal in Company L, 143rd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division. After voluntarily participating in several patrols on that day, near Altavilla, Italy, he helped to defend an ammunition storehouse against attack by German forces. When withdrawal became necessary, he stayed behind and held the German soldiers at bay until everyone had been evacuated from the storehouse.

For his actions on this day, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. After receiving the Medal, Kelly toured the country with a group of other infantrymen as part of the Army Ground Forces’ 
Here’s Your Infantry” demonstrating various battle techniques and selling war bonds. Kelly was then assigned to the Infantry School at Fort Benning, Georgia. Kelly received an honorable discharge from the Army in 1945 with the rank of technical sergeant. He died at age 64 and is buried at Highwood Cemetery in Pittsburgh.

His Medal of Honor citation reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 13 September 1943, near Altavilla, Italy, Cpl. Kelly voluntarily joined a patrol which located and neutralized enemy machine gun positions. After this hazardous duty he volunteered to establish contact with a battalion of U.S. infantry which was believed to be located on Hill 315, a mile distant. He traveled over a route commanded by enemy observation and under sniper, mortar, and artillery fire; and later he returned with the correct information that the enemy occupied Hill 315 in organized positions. Immediately thereafter Cpl. Kelly, again a volunteer patrol member, assisted materially in the destruction of 2 enemy machinegun nests under conditions requiring great skill and courage. Having effectively fired his weapon until all the ammunition was exhausted, he secured permission to obtain more at an ammunition dump. Arriving at the dump, which was located near a storehouse on the extreme flank of his regiment's position, Cpl. Kelly found that the Germans were attacking ferociously at this point. He obtained his ammunition and was given the mission of protecting the rear of the storehouse. He held his position throughout the night. The following morning the enemy attack was resumed. Cpl. Kelly took a position at an open window of the storehouse. One machine gunner had been killed at this position and several other soldiers wounded. Cpl. Kelly delivered continuous aimed and effective fire upon the enemy with his automatic rifle until the weapon locked from overheating. Finding another automatic rifle, he again directed effective fire upon the enemy until this weapon also locked. At this critical point, with the enemy threatening to overrun the position, Cpl. Kelly picked up 60mm. mortar shells, pulled the safety pins, and used the shells as grenades, killing at least 5 of the enemy. When it became imperative that the house be evacuated, Cpl. Kelly, despite his sergeant's injunctions, volunteered to hold the position until the remainder of the detachment could withdraw. As the detachment moved out, Cpl. Kelly was observed deliberately loading and firing a rocket launcher from the window. He was successful in covering the withdrawal of the unit, and later in joining his own organization. Cpl. Kelly's fighting determination and intrepidity in battle exemplify the highest traditions of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

We are eternally thankful for Technical Sergeant Kelly’s service to our country. Rest in peace, Sir.

#WWII #WW2 #USArmy #Army #MedalOfHonor #Pennsylvania #ThankYou #Sacrifice #RIP #GreatestGeneration #NeverForget #NeverForgotten #OTD #OnThisDay

https://www.facebook.com/100010204245181/posts/712696775747124/
09/10/2018

https://www.facebook.com/100010204245181/posts/712696775747124/

James Marion Logan of McNeil, Texas, was a Sergeant in the U.S. Army and a recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II on this day in 1943.

Logan joined the Texas National Guard from Luling, Texas in 1936 at the age of 15. By September 9th, 1943 he was serving as a sergeant in the 142nd Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division. On that day, he participated in the Allied landings near Salerno, Italy and single-handedly captured a German machine gun emplacement and later killed an enemy sniper.

For his actions on this day, he was awarded the Medal of Honor on July 5th, 1944.

Logan reached the rank of technical sergeant before leaving the Army in March and then National Guard in May 1945. He was awarded the Texas Legislative Medal of Honor on May 30th, 1997. He died on October 9th, 1999 and was buried at the Texas State Cemetery in Austin Texas.

His Medal of Honor citation reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty in action involving actual conflict on 9 September 1943 in the vicinity of Salerno, Italy. As a rifleman of an infantry company, Sgt. Logan landed with the first wave of the assault echelon on the beaches of the Gulf of Salerno, and after his company had advanced 800 yards inland and taken positions along the forward bank of an irrigation canal, the enemy began a serious counterattack from positions along a rock wall which ran parallel with the canal about 200 yards further inland. Voluntarily exposing himself to the fire of a machinegun located along the rock wall, which sprayed the ground so close to him that he was splattered with dirt and rock splinters from the impact of the bullets, Sgt. Logan killed the first 3 Germans as they came through a gap in the wall. He then attacked the machinegun. As he dashed across the 200 yards of exposed terrain a withering stream of fire followed his advance. Reaching the wall, he crawled along the base, within easy reach of the enemy crouched along the opposite side, until he reached the gun. Jumping up, he shot the 2 gunners down, hurdled the wall, and seized the gun. Swinging it around, he immediately opened fire on the enemy with the remaining ammunition, raking their flight and inflicting further casualties on them as they fled. After smashing the machinegun over the rocks, Sgt. Logan captured an enemy officer and private who were attempting to sneak away. Later in the morning, Sgt. Logan went after a sniper hidden in a house about 150 yards from the company. Again the intrepid Sgt. ran a gauntlet of fire to reach his objective. Shooting the lock off the door, Sgt. Logan kicked it in and shot the sniper who had just reached the bottom of the stairs. The conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity which characterized Sgt. Logan's exploits proved a constant inspiration to all the men of his company, and aided materially in insuring the success of the beachhead at Salerno.”

We are eternally thankful for Sergeant Logan’s service to our country. Rest in peace, Sir.

#WWII #WW2 #USArmy #Army #MedalOfHonor #Texas #ThankYou #Sacrifice #RIP #GreatestGeneration #NeverForget #NeverForgotten #OTD #OnThisDay

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2154227074601826&id=299662973391588
08/16/2018

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2154227074601826&id=299662973391588

James Phillip Connor of Wilmington, Delaware, was a Sergeant in the U.S. Army and a recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions during World War II on this day in 1944.

Connor joined the Army in January 1941, and by August 15th, 1944 was serving as a sergeant in the 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division. On that day, Connor led a platoon of 36 men against German positions, defended by snipers and machine gun nests, at Cape Cavalaire, France. He was seriously wounded but continued to fight until his injuries forced him to stand down. He continued to direct the assault and his men were able to successfully outflank the enemy, killing seven German soldiers and capturing forty more.

For his actions on this day, he was awarded the Medal of Honor. Connor was discharged in 1945 and died at the age of 75 in 1994.

His Medal of Honor citation reads:

“For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at risk of life above and beyond the call of duty. On 15 August 1944, Sgt. Connor, through sheer grit and determination, led his platoon in clearing an enemy vastly superior in numbers and firepower from strongly entrenched positions on Cape Cavalaire, removing a grave enemy threat to his division during the amphibious landing in southern France, and thereby insured safe and uninterrupted landings for the huge volume of men and materiel which followed. His battle patrol landed on "Red Beach" with the mission of destroying the strongly fortified enemy positions on Cape Cavalaire with utmost speed. From the peninsula the enemy had commanding observation and seriously menaced the vast landing operations taking place. Though knocked down and seriously wounded in the neck by a hanging mine which killed his platoon lieutenant, Sgt. Connor refused medical aid and with his driving spirit practically carried the platoon across several thousand yards of mine-saturated beach through intense fire from mortars, 20-mm. flak guns, machineguns, and snipers. En route to the Cape he personally shot and killed 2 snipers. The platoon sergeant was killed and Sgt. Connor became platoon leader. Receiving a second wound, which lacerated his shoulder and back, he again refused evacuation, expressing determination to carry on until physically unable to continue. He reassured and prodded the hesitating men of his decimated platoon forward through almost impregnable mortar concentrations. Again emphasizing the prevalent urgency of their mission, he impelled his men toward a group of buildings honeycombed with enemy snipers and machineguns. Here he received his third grave wound, this time in the leg, felling him in his tracks. Still resolved to carry on, he relinquished command only after his attempts proved that it was physically impossible to stand. Nevertheless, from his prone position, he gave the orders and directed his men in assaulting the enemy. Infused with Sgt. Connor's dogged determination, the platoon, though reduced to less than one-third of its original 36 men, outflanked and rushed the enemy with such furiousness that they killed 7, captured 40, seized 3 machineguns and considerable other materiel, and took all their assigned objectives, successfully completing their mission. By his repeated examples of tenaciousness and indomitable spirit Sgt. Connor transmitted his heroism to his men until they became a fighting team which could not be stopped.”

We are eternally thankful for Sergeant Connor’s service to our country. Rest in peace, Sir.

#WWII #WW2 #USArmy #Army #MedalOfHonor #Delaware #ThankYou #Sacrifice #RIP #GreatestGeneration #NeverForget #NeverForgotten #OTD #OnThisDay

Address

1301 17th St
Altoona, PA
16601

Telephone

(814) 615-9521

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Military Specialties War Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.


Other Community Museums in Altoona

Show All