National Women's History Museum

National Women's History Museum The National Women's History Museum affirms the value of knowing Women's History, illuminates the role of women in transforming society and encourages all people, women and men, to participate in democratic dialogue about our future.
The Museum researches, collects and exhibits the contributions of women to the social, cultural, economic and political life of our nation in a context of world history.

The National Women’s History Museum inspires,educates, researches and collects the stories of women's contributions to the social, political,cultural and economic life of the United States. Our goal is to build a world-class museum at the National Mall in Washington, D.C. This page accompanies our website which seeks to raise awareness and honor women’s diverse experiences and achievements through its dynamic online museum, and educational programs. The National Women’s History Museum will be the first museum in any nation’s capital to show the full scope of women's accomplishments in history and serve as a guiding light to people everywhere. The Community Guidelines serve to govern how to interact with our page. 1. We encourage you to share, post, and like content on this page. We hope this page can serve as a platform to exchange information and ideas about topics relevant to NWHM. We hope that you will contribute to the conversation. 2. Any information not posted by us, including but not limited to user content and third party ads, does not necessarily reflect the views of NWHM. We do not endorse the third party or user content on this page. 3. Please be respectful and courteous to others on this page. We reserve the right to remove posts or block users that violate these standards, including but not limited to content that is unlawful, profane, disrespectful, suggestive, spam, or contains personal information. 4. We expect that all NWHM community members will adhere to Facebook’s Community Standards, which can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards. 5. Content that you post will be considered public information and non-confidential. By participating on this page, you are giving the NWHM permission to use, archive or modify your content. Thank you for reading these guidelines! Please feel free to email us at [email protected] with any questions or comments.

Mission: The National Women’s History Museum educates, inspires, empowers, and shapes the future by integrating women's distinctive history into the culture and history of the United States.

#PrideMonth In 1973, Jeanne Manford’s love and support for her gay son in the face of negative public sentiment about ...
06/16/2019

#PrideMonth In 1973, Jeanne Manford’s love and support for her gay son in the face of negative public sentiment about homosexuality led her to create Parents of Gays—known today as #PFLAG—to provide support for families with gay children facing adversity. Her youngest son, Morty, came out at age fifteen. While distributing pro-gay flyers at a New York gala, he was beaten. To show her support for her son, she walked with him at the Christopher Street Liberation Day March, the precursor to Pride marches, with a sign urging parents to support their gay children. After an overwhelming response, she founded Parents of Gays the following year to offer support and education to families. In 2012, Manford was awarded the Presidential Citizens Medal.

In the photo of above, Manford is pictured marching alongside her son Morty Manford in a 1972 gay rights parade in New York City.

Credit: PFLAG National

Considered essential to the American Revolution, Betsy Ross is credited with sewing the first United States flag. A symb...
06/14/2019

Considered essential to the American Revolution, Betsy Ross is credited with sewing the first United States flag. A symbol of patriotism, she is often celebrated as the woman who helped George Washington finish the design. Although there is no historical evidence that she created this flag, her story has made her a national icon.

On this flag day, find out Betsy Ross’ true story here: https://bit.ly/2EUX2Iz

Photo Credit: National Archives and Records Administration

06/13/2019

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Teachers – help your students learn about the efforts of American women on the Home Front during World War II through ...
06/12/2019

Teachers – help your students learn about the efforts of American women on the Home Front during World War II through art. J. Howard Miller’s “I Can Do It” poster, featuring the character that became known to history as "Rosie the Riveter," became an iconic embodiment of women’s social and economic awakening amid one of the worst conflicts in human history. Free Download: https://bit.ly/2zFRVZ7

Photo Credit: National Museum of American History

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, a series of violent protests that catalyzed the gay civil...
06/11/2019
Stonewall at 50: How the Iconic LGBTQ Institution Keeps the Spirit of ‘69 Alive Today

This summer marks the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots, a series of violent protests that catalyzed the gay civil rights movement in the United States. In the years following, The Stonewall Inn became an important historic site for the LGBTQ community.

Read this interview with Kurt Kelly, the local businessman who purchased the hotel in recent years and restored it to its original glory: https://bit.ly/2Wlt3nz

“You want to take care of your history. This is gay history."

This chart does not reflect the breakdown of male earnings by ethnicity, due to the fact that the main data measurement ...
06/10/2019

This chart does not reflect the breakdown of male earnings by ethnicity, due to the fact that the main data measurement of this study by the Institute of Policy Studies is comparing women's wages to white men's wages, by ethnicity. Disparities exist on all sides. But, this data is quite telling.

The #EqualPayAct was signed into law #OnThisDay in 1963. While gender parity has improved, progress has been slow—and true parity, 56 years later, has yet to be achieved. Since 1979, when earnings data were first collected, the earnings ratio has only grown from 62.4 percent to 81.1 percent today. At this rate, white women would reach earnings parity in 2059—and it would take substantially longer for women of color. Black women would reach parity with white men in 2119, and Latinas in 2224. It's easy to talk about the fight for gender parity as one victory for all women, but according to this data, all women won't be able to benefit from it at the same time, and that is a crucial part of how we want to approach our discussion of #womenshistory.

In 2019, we have yet to achieve equal pay between men and women in the workplace—a disparity which plays out in dispro...
06/07/2019

In 2019, we have yet to achieve equal pay between men and women in the workplace—a disparity which plays out in disproportionate and unfair ways among American women based on ethnicity. It's time for equal pay for all women.

As we remember the heroes who landed at Normandy on D-Day, we also celebrate the 1,074 women in the Women Airforce Servi...
06/06/2019

As we remember the heroes who landed at Normandy on D-Day, we also celebrate the 1,074 women in the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) program who served their country bravely during World War II. Find out more in our online exhibit here: https://bit.ly/2QFFF37

Photo Credit: U.S. Airforce

In June 1916 suffragists Alice Paul and Lucy Burns founded the National Woman's Party (NWP) as an outgrowth of the Congr...
06/05/2019

In June 1916 suffragists Alice Paul and Lucy Burns founded the National Woman's Party (NWP) as an outgrowth of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage (CU). The NWP was more radical than many suffragist groups because it conducted acts of civil disobedience, including picketing, protesting, and even hunger strikes. In 1917, the NWP picketed the White House, and the protesters were arrested. The group's militant tactics ultimately helped President Woodrow Wilson to support a women's suffrage amendment, which led to the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. #WomensHistory

Photo Credit: Library of Congress

How did the United States' participation in World War I impact women's crusade for the right to vote? As the United Stat...
06/04/2019

How did the United States' participation in World War I impact women's crusade for the right to vote? As the United States entered the War in 1917, the National American Woman Suffrage Association encouraged its supporters to join in the war effort, arguing that women deserved the vote because they were patriots, caregivers, and mothers.

The combination of NAWSA’s war efforts, and the publicity attracted by National Woman’s Party’s pickets of the White House, led to widespread support for woman suffrage. President Woodrow Wilson appealed to patriotic arguments for suffrage when he asked Congress, “We have made partners of the women in this war; shall we admit them only to a partnership of suffering and sacrifice and toil and not to a partnership of privilege and right?”

Congress passed the 19th amendment on this day in 1919, effectively prohibiting states and the federal government from denying the right to vote to U.S. citizens on the basis of sex. The NAWSA and NWP suffragists lobbied local and state representatives to ensure its subsequent ratification by the states, in August 1920.

For more information about the crusade for the vote visit: http://www.crusadeforthevote.org/history

06/03/2019

“I think it’s really quite a bold statement by Sports Illustrated, to be honest, because it has been seen as sort of this magazine only for heterosexual males,” Rapinoe, 33, said to SI. “I think so often with gay females in sports, there’s this particular stereotype about it and there’s such a narrow view of what it means to be gay and be athletic. So to kind of just blow that up and do something totally different, I think, is really important."

Read: https://wapo.st/2QDNtCd

#PrideMonth While Christine Jorgensen wasn't the first to undergo sex reassignment, she was the first in the U.S. to be ...
06/02/2019

#PrideMonth While Christine Jorgensen wasn't the first to undergo sex reassignment, she was the first in the U.S. to be public about it. The New York native underwent sex reassignment in Denmark and changed her name to Christine Jorgensen. When she returned to the U.S., she became the subject of several tabloid stories with headlines including, "Bronx GI Becomes a Woman—Dear Mom and Dad, Son Wrote, I Have Now Become Your Daughter."

Jorgensen used her newfound notoriety to embark on a lecture and nightclub tour. In 1959 she was denied a marriage license because her birth certificate said she was male. She believed her decision to speak so publicly helped create the "awakening that led to the sexual revolution in the 50s and 60s."

Photo by Maurice Seymour, New York

This stat is shared via last year's Pew Research Center analysis of median hourly earnings of both full- and part-time w...
06/01/2019

This stat is shared via last year's Pew Research Center analysis of median hourly earnings of both full- and part-time workers in the United States. These numbers become even more alarming when broken down by race and ethnicity. It has been over 50 years since the Equal Pay Act was enacted, and we still have yet to actually achieve its tenets. Equal experience should mean equal pay. We believe in a brighter future for us all.

Filipino-American Chef Cristeta Comerford was the first woman, and the first person of color, to hold the position of Wh...
05/31/2019

Filipino-American Chef Cristeta Comerford was the first woman, and the first person of color, to hold the position of White House Executive Chef when First Lady Laura Bush promoted her in 2005. Born in the Philippines, Comerford moved to the United States to pursue her culinary dream. She worked many jobs that were less-than-glamorous—from overseeing a salad bar to cooking at Chicago hotels, before joining the White House ranks as a sous chef during the Clinton administration. First Lady Michelle Obama was also a champion of hers as the White House Executive Chef: "She is also the mom of a young daughter, and I appreciate our shared perspective on the importance of healthy eating and healthy families." Comerford spent over two decades at the White House, cooking for national and international leaders in one of the world’s most important kitchens. #WomensHistory

Photo by Tina Hager [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

On this day in 1977, Janet Guthrie became the first woman to compete in the Indianapolis 500.  The road to NASCAR fame w...
05/29/2019

On this day in 1977, Janet Guthrie became the first woman to compete in the Indianapolis 500. The road to NASCAR fame was not an easy one. When racing legend Rolla Vollstedt asked Guthrie to drive on his team, he issued a warning. “You will never be a winning driver because no one will ever give you a winning car because you are a woman.” But that did not stop her. She kept driving and eventually earned a place in the International Motorsports Hall of Fame. The Indy 500 now welcomes all drivers, opening races with the call, “Ladies and gentlemen, start your engines.”

Ride, Sally Ride! Born on May 26, 1951, Sally Ride rocketed her way into history as the first American woman in space. I...
05/26/2019

Ride, Sally Ride! Born on May 26, 1951, Sally Ride rocketed her way into history as the first American woman in space. In 1977 Ride was completing a doctorate in physics when she applied for and received a coveted position at NASA. She helped build the robotic arm for the Challenger shuttle and operated it during her historic 1983 flight. 250,000 people watched the Challenger launch from Cape Canaveral, and many more tuned in at home. Ride’s six days in space had an enduring impact. The millions of young girls watching the flight, according to Gloria Steinem, saw that they too could become “astronauts, heroes, explorers, and scientists.” #WomensHistory

Alice Babette Toklas grew up in a middle-class Jewish family in San Francisco, California. In her younger years, she stu...
05/25/2019

Alice Babette Toklas grew up in a middle-class Jewish family in San Francisco, California. In her younger years, she studied music quite seriously but had to set it aside to move home to take care of her family. Eventually, she made the decision to leave San Francisco and travel with a friend to Paris. It was there that Toklas met American writer Gertrude Stein, and they commenced a partnership that would span over four decades. They were best known for the iconic salons they would host in their home, where they would entertain the likes of Ernest Hemingway and Pablo Picasso. Toklas built quite a reputation for the food she would serve at these salons—these would become the basis for her best-selling book, The Alice B. Toklas Cookbook.

Photo Credit: Library of Congress

Asian American women have made a significant impact on the United States in a wide variety of fields. Despite facing bot...
05/23/2019

Asian American women have made a significant impact on the United States in a wide variety of fields. Despite facing both racial discrimination and sexism, these women stood strong, challenged stereotypes, and paved the way for future generations.

Read more about just a few of the women who made history here: https://bit.ly/2Eb5va6

On this day, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to complete a transatlantic flight. Four years earlier she became the...
05/21/2019

On this day, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to complete a transatlantic flight. Four years earlier she became the first woman to cross the Atlantic as a passenger—but this time she piloted the flight alone. She left from Newfoundland on May 20, 1932, and landed in Northern Ireland fifteen hours later. This feat made her an international sensation and earned her a Distinguished Flying Cross medal—the first time a woman and a civilian received this award. Five years later Earhart disappeared during her attempt to fly around the world, but she remains an aviation legend. #WomensHistory

Today, on #ArmedForcesDay, we remember women who were called to serve before they could officially enlist. Loreta Janeta...
05/20/2019

Today, on #ArmedForcesDay, we remember women who were called to serve before they could officially enlist. Loreta Janeta Velázquez reimagined herself as Lieutenant Harry T. Buford during the American Civil War. Originally from Cuba, Velázquez spent time in New Orleans and developed sympathy for the Confederate cause. Her husband tried to dissuade her from enlisting, but she ignored him. She obtained a uniform and embarked on a military career, soon recruiting over 230 men to join the cause alongside her. She fought in a handful of battles before becoming a spy for the Confederacy. Her cause is controversial, but her bravery beyond doubt. #WomensHistory

Jacqueline Cochran was the type to break barriers—literally. On this day in 1953, she became the first woman to break ...
05/18/2019

Jacqueline Cochran was the type to break barriers—literally. On this day in 1953, she became the first woman to break the sound barrier. When her plane pushed past the 770 mph speed of sound, she added to an already impressive aviation resume. Born in Florida in 1906, Cochran started flying when she was nearly 30, learning to pilot a plane in three weeks. She achieved numerous firsts, becoming the first woman to make a blind instrument landing and the first inducted into the Aviation Hall of Fame. To this day, she holds more speed and distance records than any other pilot, male or female.

Don't tell her she can't. #WomensHistory
05/17/2019

Don't tell her she can't. #WomensHistory

It’s #NationalPoliceWeek and we'd like to honor women in law enforcement. Women have had a growing presence on police ...
05/15/2019

It’s #NationalPoliceWeek and we'd like to honor women in law enforcement. Women have had a growing presence on police forces in recent decades, but one woman wore a police star as early as the 1890s. When Marie Owens’ husband died in 1888, she went to work for the city of Chicago to support her five children. She was eventually transferred to the police department, where she became a detective sergeant responsible for inspecting factories and enforcing child labor laws. She made a real difference in her community throughout her 32-year career.

More than 20 years ago, a group of dedicated women raised money to move the Portrait Monument featuring busts of Elizabe...
05/15/2019

More than 20 years ago, a group of dedicated women raised money to move the Portrait Monument featuring busts of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Lucretia Mott from the basement of the U.S. Capitol—known as The Crypt—to its rightful place in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol. Artist Adelaide Johnson carved the busts from an 8-ton block of marble for the National Woman’s Party (NWP). Known as the “sculptor of the women’s movement,” Johnson was a staunch feminist and suffragist herself. The NWP presented the sculpture at the Capitol on February 15, 1921, in honor of Susan B. Anthony’s birthday, but it was soon moved to the basement Crypt. It was not returned to its more visible place in the Rotunda until 1997 after a group of women worked with Congress. That same group of women began the movement to build the National Women's History Museum. A movement that continues today.

On this day in 1872, suffragist leader Victoria Woodhull was formally nominated as the first female candidate for United...
05/10/2019

On this day in 1872, suffragist leader Victoria Woodhull was formally nominated as the first female candidate for United States President. She ran on the Equal Rights Party's ticket with running mate Frederick Douglass—this was nearly a half-century before women had the right to vote. Woodhull was also the first woman to testify before Congress. In 1871, she argued that the 14th and 15th Amendments to the US Constitution should have also given women the right to vote. We remember her as a prominent activist for women's rights and labor reforms. #womenshistory

Photo Credit: Harvard Art Museum/Fogg Museum

Yuri Kochiyama was a lifelong civil rights activist. Kochiyama was born in 1921 and grew up near Los Angeles, but her li...
05/09/2019

Yuri Kochiyama was a lifelong civil rights activist. Kochiyama was born in 1921 and grew up near Los Angeles, but her life was forever changed after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941. When President Roosevelt issued the executive order forcing Japanese Americans into internment camps, Kochiyama and her family were relocated twice, landing in a camp in Arkansas where they spent three years.

Kochiyama met her husband in this camp, and after the war, they moved to New York City—it was here that she started holding weekly meetings for activists in her small apartment with her husband and six children, and her long tenure as a civil rights activist began in earnest. During her lifetime, she campaigned for Puerto Rican independence, nuclear disarmament, and was a member of Malcolm X's pan-Africanist Organization of Afro-American Unity. She was even present at his assassination in 1965 and held him in her arms as he lay dying.

During the 1980s, Kochiyama fought for the Civil Liberties Act, an act that would formally apologize to Japanese American internees. Kochiyama continued to be a prominent advocate for equality until her death in 2014. She was 93 years old.

Photo Credit: Kochiyama family/UCLA Asian American Studies Center

"Brathwaite did not depict the Black woman as what she could be but as what she had always been." Great write-up on Arts...
05/08/2019
Kwame Brathwaite’s Photographs Showed the World That “Black is Beautiful”

"Brathwaite did not depict the Black woman as what she could be but as what she had always been."

Great write-up on Artsy about the 1960s photography that popularized the phrase "Black is beautiful." Take a look at some of the iconic (and beautiful) photos below:

The photographer’s portraits, modeling agency, and beauty shows had an indelible impact on black beauty ideals.

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Welcome to our page! The National Women's History Museum posts use images that are available in the public domain. The Community Guidelines serve to govern how to interact with our page. 1. We encourage you to share, post, and like content on this page. We hope this page can serve as a platform to exchange information and ideas about topics relevant to NWHM. We hope that you will contribute to the conversation. 2. Any information not posted by us, including but not limited to user content and third party ads, does not necessarily reflect the views of NWHM. We do not endorse the third party or user content on this page. 3. Please be respectful and courteous to others on this page. We reserve the right to remove posts or block users that violate these standards, including but not limited to content that is unlawful, profane, disrespectful, suggestive, spam, or contains personal information. 4. We expect that all NWHM community members will adhere to Facebook’s Community Standards, which can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/communitystandards. 5. Content that you post will be considered public information and non-confidential. By participating on this page, you are giving the NWHM permission to use, archive or modify your content. Thank you for reading these guidelines! Please feel free to email us at [email protected] with any questions or comments.

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