Albany Firefighters Museum

Albany Firefighters Museum Our goal is to preserve the rich history and proud tradition of the fire service in the City of Albany NY
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01/10/2020

Today the Albany Firefighters Museum received a gift of two American LaFrance Albany wooden fire ladders stenciled Ladder3 and Ladder4, 30 and 32 foot in use until the early 1970s. The gift is from the history collection of the New York State Museum. Museum open Sat. and Sunday from 1-3

12/29/2019

The museum will be open tomorrow from 1-3 PM. Come down!

12/20/2019

AS A REMINDER..... Stop by the Albany Firefighters Museum this Saturday and Sunday between the hours of 1-3
Come visit our newly opened museum while enjoying Christmas cookies and coffee 🍪☕️
$10 donation collected at the door
2019 Ornament available for purchase.

12/17/2019

Stop by the Albany Firefighters Museum this Saturday and Sunday between the hours of 1-3
Come visit our newly opened museum while enjoying Christmas cookies and coffee 🍪☕️
$10 donation collected at the door

The Albany Firefighters Museum is proud to present the 2019 holiday ornament, representing Engine Co #4 at the Pinebush ...
12/13/2019

The Albany Firefighters Museum is proud to present the 2019 holiday ornament, representing Engine Co #4 at the Pinebush fire station.

This is the 4th holiday ornament our museum has presented, honoring Albany FD’s proud traditions.

This ornament is on sale now and can be purchased at the Albany Firemen's Federal Credit Union at 532 Central Ave during normal week day operating hours. The cost is $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members and as always, the proceeds go to funding our museum project.

Thank you for your support!

Museum will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 1-3 👏🚒
12/10/2019

Museum will be open on Saturdays and Sundays from 1-3 👏🚒

11/15/2019
09/20/2019
05/26/2019

On today’s date in 1912, Hook and Ladder 4 was organized. This company still utilizes its original station on Delaware Ave.

03/31/2019

On today’s date in 1888, Hook and Ladder 3 was organized. Stationed behind Steamer 7’s quarters at Clinton and Ontario, the building still stands today however the company now runs out of the Brevator Street Fire Station

Snorkel co #1 was placed in service today at the Delaware Ave Fire Station in 1962. This new technology in aerial appara...
03/19/2019

Snorkel co #1 was placed in service today at the Delaware Ave Fire Station in 1962. This new technology in aerial apparatus brought advanced firefighting capabilities to the city of Albany. It took 11 days for its first run to a fire on Livingston Ave.

This company closed many years later. We would appreciate the date of closure if you could leave it in the comments.

02/11/2019

Hook and Ladder 5 was organized on today’s date in 1931 and was the last Ladder company organized in Albany. It ran out of the New Scotland Ave station with Engine 11 who continues to be stationed there.

Ladder 5 closed many years later. If anyone has the date of its closure we would appreciate the information in the comments

01/23/2019

Interested in preserving a part of Albany's history? The Albany Firefighters Museum is asking for photos of the City's past and present firehouses for a book we are working on! Please send images and information to [email protected]

Albany Fire Departments first organized recruit class, June of 1972. Training lasted one week. Photo courtesy of: Ret Ca...
12/27/2018

Albany Fire Departments first organized recruit class, June of 1972. Training lasted one week.

Photo courtesy of: Ret Capt Dan Doherty

Another big step to developing a museum to honor the past and present firefighters of the Albany Fire Department and Alb...
12/13/2018
Albany Fire Museum More Likely Thanks to Widow's Donation

Another big step to developing a museum to honor the past and present firefighters of the Albany Fire Department and Albany Permanent Professional Firefighters Association Local 2007. While this ambitious project may still take years to have a physical building, we’re proud that the memory of Lt Brady will be a big part of it along with so many who have donated already to its cause.

Shirley Brady sees this as a great tribute to her husband.

12/04/2018

Unfortunately due to delays in design, we will not have the 2018 holiday ornament for sale this year.

Please visit the Albany Firemen's Federal Credit Union to purchase an ornament from the past years! Thank you always for your support

07/12/2018

On today’s date 1885, the Boardman and Gray piano manufactory and Burch livery stable Fire on North Pearl St occurred, causing massive property loss and the loss of three firefighters in the line of duty:

John Luby - Steamer 2

Fred Wallen - Steamer 4

Daniel Wheeler - Steamer 4

All firefighters were killed when walls began to collapse on them.

05/04/2018

In 1885, the salary for the 64 Hosemen and 24 Laddermen (both equivalent to the rank of Firefighter today) of the Albany FD was $200.00 dollars a year

04/30/2018

In the year 1885, the Albany Fire Department responded to 299 alarms throughout the city, including a large fire in March at the Delaware and Hudson Canal Company’s depot on Church Street, requiring the assistance of the Troy and Greenbush Fire Departments.

04/30/2018
Albany Firefighters Museum

Albany Firefighters Museum

Check out the link for our news letter, and see the progress we’re making.

03/03/2018

On today’s date in 1883, Ladderman Wm. Carlin of Truck Co 2, was killed by a falling wall at the Dunlop Elevator Fire, located on Quay St.

03/02/2018
Schumaker Fire Photography

Thanks Schumaker Fire Photography for sharing this video of the South Enders responding from quarters on South Pearl Street in 1991

Albany Fire Department E5 and T1 responding to a call. 1991

02/06/2018

On today’s date in 1874, Hoseman Alonzo Brown of Steamer Co. 5 died of Bright’s disease (Kidney disease)

The Rescue Squad parked outside of its former home at the Midtown Fire Station, located on the corner of Washington and ...
02/06/2018

The Rescue Squad parked outside of its former home at the Midtown Fire Station, located on the corner of Washington and Western Avenues.

01/31/2018

Fireman John Earley of Steamer Co 1, died of Consumption (Tuberculosis) on today’s date in 1885

Albany Firefighters Museum panels on  display at 384 Broadway, Albany until end of February 2018
01/22/2018

Albany Firefighters Museum panels on display at 384 Broadway, Albany until end of February 2018

01/16/2018

On this date in 1875, Ladderman James Winne of Truck 1, was thrown from the truck while attempting to mount it during an alarm, dying of the injuries sustained during the incident

Engine company 1’s quarters at “the point” of Washington and Western Avenues. Believed to be sometime in the 30’s
01/15/2018

Engine company 1’s quarters at “the point” of Washington and Western Avenues. Believed to be sometime in the 30’s

The closed Steamer Co 6 (Engine 6), in its glory days before being remodeled, at the corner of Jefferson and S Swan St.
01/14/2018

The closed Steamer Co 6 (Engine 6), in its glory days before being remodeled, at the corner of Jefferson and S Swan St.

Truck 1’s former quarters on Westerlo St in the South End. The building still exists today as a multiple occupant dwelli...
01/12/2018

Truck 1’s former quarters on Westerlo St in the South End.

The building still exists today as a multiple occupant dwelling

Truck 3 being reviewed by Chief Fleming sometime in the early 1900’s. Unknown location of photo.
01/11/2018

Truck 3 being reviewed by Chief Fleming sometime in the early 1900’s.

Unknown location of photo.

12/29/2017

Ladderman Francis Winne of Truck Company 1, died of Consumption (Tuberculosis) on today’s date in 1883

12/19/2017
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On this Date in 1892, Charles E. Marshall, Foreman; Bernard Bamer, Hoseman; Fred Amthor, Hoseman; John W. Bridgeford, Hoseman were killed while operating at the Fort Orange Milling Company:
At 12:30 o’clock this afternoon a terrific explosion occurred in the elevator shaft of the Fort Orange Milling Company’s building backing up on the Erie Canal basin. The sparks set fire to the dry grain and flour. In an instant the blaze rushed up the shaft, and before an alarm was sent in the entire structure was a mass of flames. Charles B. Woolverton, a member of the firm, was in the office at the time, and when the explosion occurred started for the rear of the office to close the safe. Before he could get out he was surrounded by flames, and when he managed to fight his way through them he was burned in a most terrible manner.; The fire burned through the afternoon, and as the men of Steamer Company No. 4 were ordered home, the 60-foot-high east wall toppled over, buried seven firemen. Three were killed immediately, and one more was expected to die from his injuries.

RIP Brothers

The 2017, 150th anniversary, holiday ornaments are officially on sale and can be picked up at the Albany Firemen's Feder...
12/18/2017

The 2017, 150th anniversary, holiday ornaments are officially on sale and can be picked up at the Albany Firemen's Federal Credit Union (532 Central Ave) during normal business hours.

There’s only 250 produced, so get them while they last.

They are $20, or $15 for museum members.

The annual holiday ornament is finally in and will be for sale this Monday afternoon. The 2017 ornament honors the 150th...
12/15/2017

The annual holiday ornament is finally in and will be for sale this Monday afternoon.

The 2017 ornament honors the 150th anniversary of the reorganization of the Albany Fire Department into the department that it continues to be today.

The items featured on the ornament is the first fire alarm box used in Albany (late 1800’s), a Hand tub engine used in the early 1800’s, Engine 7’s quarters before the remodel (oldest firehouse still in use in Albany), the AFD Water Tower used in the early 1900’s and now housed at the state museum, and finally a modern Pierce Engine still in use by many companies.

The ornaments cost $20 and can be picked up at the Albany Firemans Credit Union (532 Central Ave) during normal business hours. All the profits will go towards our museum project honoring the Albany Fire Dept and it’s members.

12/12/2017

On today’s date in 1873, Hoseman John Dundon of Steamer Co. 5 died of Typhoid pneumonia

It’s the beginning! We have started to move into 384 Broadway .. the first museum board meeting in our new space will be...
12/11/2017

It’s the beginning! We have started to move into 384 Broadway .. the first museum board meeting in our new space will be held Dec 18,2017 at 6:30 pm ... after that day the museum will be open with limited hours for showing of current items.

12/06/2017

In 1883, the Common Council of Albany approved the purchase of a new ladder truck to replace Truck Co 2. The cost of the new apparatus was $3,500 and was state of the art of the time with an extension ladder and a rotating turn table.

Ladder trucks (tractor drawn aerial) now exceed 1.1 million dollars.

12/04/2017

On today’s date in 1881, Hoseman EJ Ryan of Steamer 8 died of Consumption(Tuberculosis)

We’ve been receiving requests about the 2017 holiday ornament. We have been working on a special 150th anniversary ornam...
12/03/2017

We’ve been receiving requests about the 2017 holiday ornament. We have been working on a special 150th anniversary ornament, highlighting our departments extensive history. We hope to receive the ornaments in a few weeks. Keep an eye open on our page for sales information when they arrive.

If you’re looking to purchase the 2015 or 2016 firehouse ornaments of the Midtown Fire Station and Arbor Hill Fire Station, they are available at the Albany Fireman’s Credit Union for sale during normal business hours. The cost is $20.

Ladder 4, a 1971 Tractor Drawn Aerial American LaFrance 1000 series with a 100’ stick. Ladder 4 has been continuously op...
11/20/2017

Ladder 4, a 1971 Tractor Drawn Aerial American LaFrance 1000 series with a 100’ stick. Ladder 4 has been continuously operating from the Delaware Ave Fire House since 1912.

Albany Firefighters making a grab at a fire on Grand St in Albany’s South End, sometime in the 60’s. Note the early SCBA...
11/16/2017

Albany Firefighters making a grab at a fire on Grand St in Albany’s South End, sometime in the 60’s. Note the early SCBA’s, which were not required for firefighters that did not want to wear them in a fire.

Friends of Albany History
11/15/2017

Friends of Albany History

The Great Fire of 1848.. or why there aren't more historic buildings in Albany

APPALLING CONFLAGRATION!
500 BUILDINGS BURNED!!
$3,000,000 Property Lost!!
Fire, though a good servant, is indeed a fearful master! And fearfully did this mad element rage yesterday! Our city is desolate! The ruin is appalling! The spirit sinks and the heart sickens, in contemplating such frightful losses – such side-spread ruin. Painful, most painful, is the task of gathering up the afflicting details.
Most of the commercial portion of the city, with fifteen or twenty densely populated squares, is a black and smouldering (sic) ruin. From Herkimer st., where the Fire broke out, to Columbia st., where it was arrested, in distance, is MORE THAN HALF A MILE And all that work of destruction was accomplishes in FIVE HOURS There could, therefore, have been little time to snatch property from the rapacious flames.
Amid all this suffering, there is much cause for gratitude. When the conflagration was at its height – when more than half the city was threatened, and when no human arm could save, a kind Providence interposed! The wind suddenly changed from South to N West, and this change brought with it abundant and continued rain. Fires that had extended to several buildings in the vicinity of the burnt district, were providentially extinguished by the rain.
The great loss, superadded to the large sums swallowed up during the winter and spring. By kindred calamities, has impaired the fortunes or wealthy people, unpoverished hundreds of the middling class, and utterly ruined hundreds of poor hard working families.
This fire ran over portions of the city that had been laid waste by recent conflagrations, and upon which new buildings had just been finished. The Columbian Hotel and Fort Orange are again demolished. Mr. S. F Shepard, who had erected new buildings and resumed business, is again burnt out. We are happy to learn, however, that he saved about $2,000 worth of goods.
The Steam Boats ISAAC NEWTON and RIP VAN WINKLE were both on fire, but both got off into the river and preserved.
Eleven Tow Boats, between forty and sixty Canal Boats, one small Steam Boat, one Schooner and two floats, were destroyed.
This disastrous fire originated in the Stable of Mr. Callaghan, which adjoins that of Mr. Johnson. It is not known how it originated.
The ruins cover an area of 200 acres, every foot of which was densely covered with buildings.
There were more buildings upon it than upon any other equal space in the city. Four fifths of the buildings burned were brick – most of them large and substantial; and many of them three or four stones in height.
Until 5 o’clock, it was feared that the flames could not be checked south of State street; but about this hour the wind changed to the north, and gave new hope to those ready to despair.
But while this change of wind was of great service in the heart of the town, it proved expensive to the property on and south of Lydius street, between Dalhus and Broadway and Lydius and Herkimer All the property within these boundaries was destroyed after the wind changed. No fears of its destruction were entertained previously.
There have been several lives lost. Mr. JOHNSON, wife, daughter, and grand-child, who lived next to the Columbian, were horribly burned. The child and Mr. J. are dead: others are not expected to recover. We have rumors of other deaths, but cannot trace them.
The Firemen did as well as they could; but it seemed impotent to attempt any thing against the fury of the flames; no human power could stay them. Our neighbors from Greenbush, West Troy and Troy, came to the assistance of our Firemen, and did efficient service.
At 1 o’clock, A. M., the wooden buildings on fire in Union st. looked threatening, and the alarm was sounded. At this moment, the Cohoes Engine Co came into the city, having left their village at 9 o’clock – dragging their engine all the way by hand. They at once proceeded to the place of the alarm, and by their timely aid, the fire was checked.
When it was ascertained that the engines were unable to cope with the flames, it was determined to blow up some buildings in Hudson-street and Broadway. Capt. Stone, of the Ordinance Department and now stationed at the Arsenal, volunteered his services, and three buildings were blown up, and the flames thus kept on the south side of Hudson-st.
Not more than four or five buildings are left standing between Herkimer and Hamilton and Union sts. and the River. The desolation is complete. Mr. Akin’s buildings, south of Herkimer-st and near Dalius-st., are badly scorched; but nothing was burned south of that line.
We have endeavored to gather the names of all the principal sufferers, and where it was possible, the amount lost. In the former we have been successful; in the latter, not. It is quite out of the question, generally, to get at figures.
Losses on the Pier.
The buildings on the Pier, from the Hamilton street bridge to the cut at Maiden Lane, which were all constructed of wood, were entirely destroyed. We give the occupants and losses as far as could be ascertained, commencing at the cut.
Carpenter’s shop, Loss not ascertained
Wm Coughtry’s grocery store, Do
Albany and Canal Line, No loss
Oswego Line, L. S Littlejohn, No loss
VanDerwater & Co, No loss
Evans’ Transportation Line, Trifling loss
Clinton Line – Wm. Monteath, No loss.
Utica Line, Small loss.
H. F. Meech & Co, Small loss
Geo. E. Gay, Do.
(illegible) Jacobs, Total loss.
L. G. Chase, No loss.
E. S. Prosser, Do
C. W. Godard & Co, Loss $2000; no insurance
Climac, John McCardel, Total loss; no insurance
Swiftsure Line office and People’s Lane.
Porter House,
Geo. Kreuder, boarding house, Total loss, not known.
Peter Van Bramer, oyster house.
Wm. Radcliff, cooper. Loss now known
A. L. Lawrence, grocery store; Insured
Lay & Craft, produce dealers, Insured $5,000, which will cover loss.
A. P. Vandenburgh, produce dealers, Insured – loss $1,000.
Allen & Read, produce dealers, insured $1000, loss small.
E. A. Benedict, produce dealer; loss trifling.
O. G. Terry, do; fully insured.
Read & Rawls, do; ins $4,000 in Lexington Co, Ky; $3,000 in N. Western Co., Oswego, $3,000 in Fireman’s Co, Albany; fully insured.
B. P. Jones, do; partially insured.
E. A. Durant & Co, do; loss $10,000; insured $6,000 in Howard Ins. Co. N Y
Wing, Chipman & Co, do; insured $500, fully covered
Mr. Crantz, boarding house; loss not known.
Western Hotel, kept by Jesiah L. Dow; loss $6,000, insured $2,000
The building below the bridge, occupied by the Troy and People’s line, was also destroyed; loss now known.
In the Basin.
Schr. Cotun, Barnstable; total loss.
Schr. Elize Matilda, slightly damaged.
Two boats belonging to Swiftsure line, Walace, Eli Hart, A. Marvin, Western, Superior, and the large float. 100 tons merchandise burnt. Loss on boats $60,000.
T. James loss – barge Rough and Ready and the lake boat Josephine.
Hudson River Line; large Float. Loss $3000.
Eagle line: boats Lockpot and Barber. Loss $12,000
Canal Boats – Mazeppa, Chamberlain & Olmstead Loss 300; ins. Henry Williams 1 bt loss 1000; insured. T. P. Waters 2; 2000; no insur W. H. Clarke & Co., 4; no ins. Clinton line 2, H. T. Meech 2, laden. E. S. Prosser 1.
The small towing steamer Wm. Seymour.
The Hamilton street bridge was also destroyed.
In Columbia street, the Washington Market was burned to the ground; and two, two story brick buildings north of it, belonging to C. A. Ten Eyck, were gutted – nothing but the walls remain standing.
...................Albany Evening Journal, Albany, NY 18 Aug 1848

Address

384 Broadway
Albany, NY
12207

Opening Hours

Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

+15184281025

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Comments

Morning everyone! I acquired this book today, does anyone know the history of it? Was it released in a fundraiser type of way?
Items belonged to my Great Grandfather, Jacob Levy. On January 25,1871, at a meeting of the Board of Fire Commissioners he was appointed to fill a vacancy in Steamer Co. No. 4 as a hoseman. In October 1892 at a meeting of the board, Department Physician Lochner reported that he should be retired due to a physical disability, and on motion of Fire Commissioner Ronan, he was retired on October 5, 1892. The board met as trustees of the fund for the relief of disabled firemen and Jacob Levy was placed on the retired list at half pay (annual allowance of $100). John W. Bridgeman was appointed hoseman of steamer 4 in place of Jacob Levy.
This badge belonged to Chief Michael J Fleming. From the collection of retired Rensselaer Firefighter Michael Mann.
Officer George Carey or Carous,Willie Andersen,Jack Fitz, second from right Tommy Coleman.4 Hudson east of Pearl. Best info I have.
Like threading a needle.
This is very interesting to me and would love to know more of it's history and pictures. My Granfather Thomas Kelly was a fireman in the 1920's era and my uncle, Frank Kelly was a fireman after the war. My Grandfather's brother-in-law was also a firema nand his name was William (Willy) Galafaro. My grandfather was injured carrying a baby to a window with a ladder when the boiler blewup with them landing on the sidewalk on Morton Ave. He worked until retirement in the alarm pull station on Delaware Ave. I remember taking a dinner pail up to my Grandfather with my Dad when he worked evenings. My Uncle Willy became diabetic eventually loosing both legs. He became very good friends with the Lombaro's and became a permant fixture holding court to all sitting on a special made bar stool drinking his tonic water at their restaurant on lower Madison Ave.
A Good Friend of mine, Lt. James O’Donnell has written a new book titled “ Sons Of Valor Parents Of Faith” In his book Lt. O’Donnell looks at the lives of Ten First Responders, Nine Of which were Members of the New York City Fire Department and One a Member Of the New York City Police Department whose lives were Tragically cut short due to the Terrorist Attack on September 11 , 2001 at the World Trade Center and how their Families have had to cope with the loss of a Loved One on 9-11 Please Everyone Like and Share this Page Lt O’Donnell is donating All proceeds from the Sale of this Book to Various FDNY 9-11 Charities Available on line @ Amazon and Barnes and Noble jodonnellfdny.com
Great History Here!
On this date in 1938, Firefighter Frederick F. Schmitt of Engine 2, died after being stricken at a fire in the Albany Florist Supply on Broadway. Firefighter Schmitt left behind his wife Mary Coffey Schmitt and seven sons, the youngest Howard R. Schmitt would later become Battalion Chief.
This is an 1886 photo of Steamer 6, my great great grandfather is Foreman John A. Burns, eventually Captain of Steamer 6 until his death in 1936.
On December 22, 1909, the Albany Journal, printed an article on my Grandfather who passed away one week after retiring after 30 yrs on the AFD, of which 22 yrs were as Tillerman on Truck 2, this happened many yrs ago and my father was only 4 yrs old at the time, the other article was on day of burial, Dec. 24,1909, and he was given a Dept. Funeral. I just posted this as interest in the museum.