New York State Museum

New York State Museum The New York State Museum is a center of art, science, and history dedicated to exploring the human and natural history of the state.

The New York State Museum is a center of art, science, and history dedicated to exploring the human and natural history of the state. Established in 1836, it is the oldest and largest state museum in the country. From its beginning, the Museum has been home to some of the nation’s leading scientists, including the founders of American paleontology, ethnology, botany and mycology. Its collections rank among the finest in many fields and total more than 16 million scientific specimens and one million cultural objects. Located at the southern end of the architecturally stunning Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza in Albany, the New York State Museum welcomes visitors from across the globe and thousands of students each year. Its 100,000 square feet of exhibition space features several new exhibitions per year in addition to long term exhibitions. The Museum also offers a variety of educational public programs for learners of all ages.

This year’s CANstruction structures have been packed up, put on  pallets and 80,000 canned goods are being shipped off t...
05/08/2020

This year’s CANstruction structures have been packed up, put on pallets and 80,000 canned goods are being shipped off to food pantries around the region. The Museum would like to thank the CANstruction Committee leaders and all of the teams for their endless creativity and hard work to build these incredible structures and congratulate the teams who received awards.

The 2020 Team Spirit Award goes to CT Male (CANniversary Cake)

The 2020 People’s Choice Award goes to AOW/Envision (Ratatouille)

The final 2020 can tally for this year’s Canstruction event is 117,965 pounds of food donated to the Food Pantries.

To discover the other awards given earlier in March 2020, please visit www.capitalregioncanstruction.com/uncategorized/2020-capital-region-canstruction-awards/

If you would like to donate to the Food Pantries, please visit www.thefoodpantries.org/

ACTIVITY: After looking closely at the 3D images of the 2020 CANstructures (https://players.cupix.com/p/kvg51DDs), try building your own city with templates designed by British architecture design and engineering firm, Foster + Partners at www.demilked.com/architecture-from-home-foster-partners/

05/07/2020
Field Trip: The Windlass of the Erie Canal

Join Senior Historian and Curator, Brad Utter, for a tour of the giant windlass in our exhibit Enterprising Waters: New York's Erie Canal. Check out this cool structure, learn how it worked, and how the canal warehouse served as the “Amazon of the 19th century”.

Today’s field trip at 1pm will take you down to the Erie Canal where the windlass served as the heart of the most powerf...
05/07/2020

Today’s field trip at 1pm will take you down to the Erie Canal where the windlass served as the heart of the most powerful distribution centers of the 19th Century.

Live at 1pm: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum
Recorded after 5pm: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

#HistoryHumpday: Tobacco Trading CardsFrom the nineteenth century into the early twentieth century, cigarettes were pack...
05/06/2020

#HistoryHumpday: Tobacco Trading Cards
From the nineteenth century into the early twentieth century, cigarettes were packaged with collectable trading cards. The cards commonly depicted famous athletes, stage actors, or other popular culture figures of the time. In 1888 W. Duke Sons & Co. Honest Long Cut Tobacco included cards of 25 “Presidential Possibilities” in their cigarette packs. The cards included President Grover Cleveland and the future President Benjamin Harrison who won the election of 1888. New York had five contenders in the election, including: Grover Cleveland, Chauncey M. Depew, David B. Hill, Roswell P. Flower, and William C. Whitney. #NYSMhistorycollection #presidential

Pictured are Chauncey M. Depew, Roswell P. Flower, and William C. Whitney

05/06/2020
Today at 1pm, travel back 13-12,500 years ago when the West Athens Hill in the Hudson Valley was occupied by a group of ...
05/06/2020

Today at 1pm, travel back 13-12,500 years ago when the West Athens Hill in the Hudson Valley was occupied by a group of Native Americans trying to survive the harsh landscapes of Ice Age New York!

LIVE at 1pm: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum
Recorded after 5pm: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

05/05/2020
Field Trip: Finding Spirit in Stone: Henry DiSpirito

Henry DiSpirito immigrated from Italy to Utica, NY in 1921. A stonemason by trade, he dreamed of life as an artist, and soon found his calling in direct stone carving. Learn about how DiSpirito coaxed animals out of stones he found in the Mohawk Valley, how he worked to become a successful artist, and how he used his art to give back to his community.

Live today at 1pm! Discover the art of sculptor Henry DiSpirito and how he learned to coax figures of people and animals...
05/05/2020

Live today at 1pm! Discover the art of sculptor Henry DiSpirito and how he learned to coax figures of people and animals out of the stones he found in the Mohawk Valley.

Live at 1pm: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum, or recorded Recorded after 5pm: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

Attention Caregivers, Educators, and Students!When Henry DiSpirito (1898–1995) emigrated from Italy in 1921 he was alrea...
05/04/2020

Attention Caregivers, Educators, and Students!

When Henry DiSpirito (1898–1995) emigrated from Italy in 1921 he was already a trained stonemason and bricklayer. In Utica, New York, he found work in those trades but longed to devote his life to art. He found his calling in the direct-carving style of sculpture. Most of his subjects were animals or human figures, rendered in fieldstone or wood.

ACTIVITY: Try creating a sculpture using DiSpirito’s direct-carving style! Create a soap carving at home using a bar of soap and some common household tools like scrapers, peelers, spoons, and a pencil. You can trace your bar of soap onto a piece of paper to sketch a simple design before you start carving. A helpful hint is to work slowly starting with the general shape, adding your details at the end.

For our younger artists, consider focusing on the difference between additive and subtractive process for sculpture. Have them experiment sculpting animals using clay or modeling dough. Adding pieces of dough together to create their sculpture or starting with a block and taking small pieces away to create their final piece.

LEARN MORE: Join us for a live virtual field trip May 5th at 1pm to learn more about Henry DiSpirito and his artwork! www.facebook.com/nysmuseum

Wondering what's new at the NYSM? Find out from our online resources page! Updated weekly, you'll find information about...
05/04/2020

Wondering what's new at the NYSM? Find out from our online resources page! Updated weekly, you'll find information about our upcoming Facebook Live Field Trips, new video highlights, and activities you can download for the kids! www.nysm.nysed.gov/resources

Take one (or all three!) of these LIVE field trips to the NYSM this week:5/5: Finding Spirit in Stone: Sculptor Henry Di...
05/04/2020

Take one (or all three!) of these LIVE field trips to the NYSM this week:
5/5: Finding Spirit in Stone: Sculptor Henry DiSpirito
5/6: The Oldest Artifacts in New York
5/7: The Windlass of the Erie Canal
All Facebook Live Field Trips to the NYSM can be viewed live at 1pm from our main page: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum or from the archived video after 5pm from the NYSM YouTube page: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

Attention Educators, Caregivers, and Students!Enjoy Learning about Maritime Art!In 1609, when Henry Hudson’s ship, de Ha...
05/01/2020

Attention Educators, Caregivers, and Students!

Enjoy Learning about Maritime Art!

In 1609, when Henry Hudson’s ship, de Halve Maen, dropped anchor near present-day Manhattan, two very different worlds met. One was the world of the Dutch Republic, a new country created from bitter conflict and new economic realities. The other was the world of Native Americans, people whose ancestors had lived along the “Great River” for thousands of years. This meeting would change both worlds in profound ways. It would also produce many of the ideas and values that define us as Americans.

Learn more about the journey of the Half Moon (de Halve Maen) and what life was like for the sailors aboard. Introduce your kids to basic nautical vocabulary with games and activities! Have students MEASURE, PLAY, CREATE, AND LEARN!

MEASURE: The Halve Maen: It was 85 feet in length—an impossibly small-seeming vessel for crossing an ocean—and must have been crowded for its 16 or so crew members. Can you measure out 85 feet?

PLAY: Captains Coming! This is a great game to learn some basic ship vocabulary and get some energy out. This game is best played in an open space. Same rules as Simon Says. Explain to the crew (kids) that they are on a ship and that the crew will need to follow certain instructions. Point out the 4 sides of the ship that the crew will need to know (bow, stern, port, and starboard). Have the caller practice with the crew running to those 4 directions. Now, give the crew other instructions that they will need to follow. The most important rule—when the caller yells “Captain’s Coming!” the crew must stand at attention and they are not allowed to move until the caller says “at ease”—anyone that moves is out for that round. Optional instructions include: Raise the Sail (pretend to hoist the sail), Rowboat (sit on the ground and pretend to row away), Seasick (run to the side of the ship), Jellyfish (get on the ground and shake your arms and legs in the air). Or make up your own rules!

CREATE: Try to draw a sailing ship—can you identify the parts of the boat?

LEARN: Watch NYSM videos aboard the Half Moon replica here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_TT1hy1QP0&t=3s and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2uKySsbFjbI&t=4s. Check out National Geographic’s Life on the Half Moon https://www.nationalgeographic.org/a…/life-on-the-half-moon/

04/30/2020
Field Trip: Ellis Island Experience

Join museum educator, Kat Morehouse, on a tour through the Museum’s immigration exhibits to learn about Ellis Island and the experiences that new immigrants faced after entering the United States. This program is best suited for upper-elementary students, but all are welcome!

Did your family travel through Ellis Island? What were some of the challenges they may have faced during the immigration...
04/30/2020

Did your family travel through Ellis Island? What were some of the challenges they may have faced during the immigration process? What could they expect upon entering the United States? Find out LIVE today at 1pm! www.facebook.com/nysmuseum or recorded after 5pm at www.youtube.com/nysmuseum. #ellisisland #immigration

#HistoryHumpday: The RocketcarDaniel D. Hungerford and his brother Floyd S. Hungerford shared a great interest in rocket...
04/29/2020

#HistoryHumpday: The Rocketcar
Daniel D. Hungerford and his brother Floyd S. Hungerford shared a great interest in rockets and flying. They designed a rocket-powered automobile that they debuted on November 2, 1929, in their hometown of Elmira, New York. The Hungerford Rocket Car, named the Shirley Lois Moon Girl after Daniel's daughter, was based on a 1921 Chevrolet 490 chassis covered with a framework made of basswood strips, isinglass windows, and plate glass covered with heavy cardboard that had been painted black. ��The Rocketcar is in the collection of the New York State Museum. For more information on the Hungerford brothers and their inventions, check out the open-access book by NYSM Senior Historian Emeritus, Geoffrey Stein:http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/common/nysm/files/nysmrecord-vol4_0.pdf

Image 1: Daniel and Floyd held their rocket engine, the device installed in the rocket car, c. 1930.

Image 2: Daniel Hungerford posed at the rear of the rocket car.

Image 3 : Photograph of the rocket car in operation, July 29, 1934, at the Colussy Brothers Airport, Coudersport, Pennsylvania.

04/29/2020
Field Trip: A Tour of Birds of New York Hall

Join NYSM Curator of Ornithology, Dr. Jeremy Kirchman, in our Birds of New York exhibit hall for a guided tour of the newly renovated dioramas depicting the major bird habitats of New York State. This iconic, permanent exhibit has been a favorite of museum visitors of all ages since it was opened in 1976. Now Birds of New York enters a new era, with upgraded lighting, realistic backgrounds, and taxidermy bird mounts that have been cleaned or replaced. See how the entire hall has been completely re-interpreted with new maps, photos, and updated information about bird ecology and evolution and conservation.

Today at 1pm! Get an up close look at all of the renovations and new additions to the NYSM's Birds of New York Hall! Liv...
04/29/2020

Today at 1pm! Get an up close look at all of the renovations and new additions to the NYSM's Birds of New York Hall!
Live at 1PM: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum
Available recorded after 5pm: www.youtube.com

#ScienceTuesday: Underwater Archaeology in New YorkBeneath the waters of New York State lie hundreds of shipwrecks, but ...
04/28/2020

#ScienceTuesday: Underwater Archaeology in New York
Beneath the waters of New York State lie hundreds of shipwrecks, but did you know there are also submerged landscapes, drowned by rising sea levels? A large swath of the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to Southern NY was dry land during the last glacial maximum, about 20,000 years ago. Since then, water from melting glaciers caused global (eustatic) sea level rise, flooding portions of the continental shelf. Seas have risen as much as 130 meters, drowning what was once inhabitable land and presumably countless archaeological sites on land that stretched 150 kilometers from the modern coastline. Rates of sea level change has been higher in the past, slowing about 6-3000 years ago as shorelines approached their current levels. Today, sea levels continue to rise, accelerating as a consequence of global warming.

Changing sea levels have significant implications for archaeological research in coastal areas such as Southeastern NY. Any reconstruction of ancient subsistence strategies and settlement patterns should consider the drowned portion of the landscape. Our knowledge of early Native American groups, their interactions and means of expressing territoriality, is limited without data from the now-submerged coast. Archaeology of underwater precontact sites may be the best way to examine issues such as the origin of aquatic adaptations, settlement and mobility strategies at the coast versus interior, and seasonal subsistence patterns in eastern North America prior to the establishment of the present coastline.
#NYSMresearch #underwaterarchaeology

Figure 1: Eastern North America at the end of the last Ice Age

Figure 2: Sea level rise: global (eustatic) and New York curves

Figure 3: Ancient (“paleo”) shorelines of southern New York

Figure 4: Stone artifacts (~4000 years old) from a drowned precontact site in the Hudson River, northern Westchester County

04/28/2020
Field Trip: A Glimpse of Dutch Material Culture

Following Henry Hudson’s famous voyage of 1609, Dutch traders and farmers established a presence within today’s boundary of New York. Join Dr. Michael Lucas, Curator of Historical Archaeology, as he talks about the everyday objects that the Dutch brought with them and what archaeology can tell us about their multiple uses.

Attention Students, Educators, and Caregivers! Learn how young people made a difference during WWI through knitting!New ...
04/27/2020

Attention Students, Educators, and Caregivers! Learn how young people made a difference during WWI through knitting!

New York State and its citizens played a critical role in the United States’ efforts during World War I on the home front through industry, agriculture, and charitable organizations. Children and families participated through victory gardens, rationing, and knitting their bit!

ACTIVITY: During WWI, children were encouraged to contribute items for the war effort with campaigns like “Knit Your Bit”, have your children try this easy finger knitting activity. All you need is yarn, and you can learn how using these simple instructions: https://www.wikihow.com/Finger-Knit. Think about who is on our front line during this time of sacrifice. You could send your creations to essential workers that are helping us while we do our part in social distancing.

LEARN: Learn more about this exhibit, A Spirit of Sacrifice: New York State in the First World War, online at https://exhibitions.nysm.nysed.gov/WWI/

SHARE: Show us your New York Spirit of Sacrifice by sharing a photo of your knitting creation!

ENJOY: Participate in the virtual story time of Fulton County Museum, Thursday, April 30th at 2:00, when they will read the story "Knit Your Bit: A World War I Story" by Deborah Hopkinson and illustrated by Steven Guarnaccia: https://www.facebook.com/events/710263946421176/

Three new LIVE field trips to take this week at the NYSM:4/28: A Glimpse of Dutch Material Culture4/29: Explore Birds of...
04/27/2020

Three new LIVE field trips to take this week at the NYSM:
4/28: A Glimpse of Dutch Material Culture
4/29: Explore Birds of New York Hall
4/30: Ellis Island Experience
All Facebook Live Field Trips to the NYSM can be viewed live at 1pm from our main page: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum or from the archived video after 3pm from the NYSM YouTube page: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

New from the NYSM!http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/resourcesLooking for easy-to-access educational activities, videos, and reso...
04/23/2020

New from the NYSM!
http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/resources
Looking for easy-to-access educational activities, videos, and resources for your kids, students, or even just for yourself? The NYSM has created this educational one-stop-shop webpage just for you! With links to our virtual “Fieldtrips,” digital collections, online resources, and fun activities based on the museum’s research and collections, this webpage brings together many of the museum’s resources for you to explore from the comfort of home! New information and activities will be added to the page weekly, so be sure to bookmark it and check back often!

04/23/2020
Field Trip: The Rotunda of the NYS Education Building (Part 2)

On this virtual field trip, we’ll head across the street from the Museum to the NYS Education Building where your insightful tour guide, Carl Morrone, will highlight the building's history, unique architectural elements, and the monumental murals that adorn the walls of the Rotunda.

04/23/2020
Field Trip: The Rotunda of the NYS Education Building (Part 1)

On this virtual field trip, we’ll head across the street from the Museum to the NYS Education Building where your insightful tour guide, Carl Morrone, will highlight the building's history, unique architectural elements, and the monumental murals that adorn the walls of the Rotunda.

Take a virtual trip at 1pm today to the NYS Education Building where your insightful tour guide, Carl Morrone, will high...
04/23/2020

Take a virtual trip at 1pm today to the NYS Education Building where your insightful tour guide, Carl Morrone, will highlight the building's history, unique architectural elements, and the monumental murals that adorn the walls of the Rotunda.

Live at 1pm: www.facebook.com/nysmuseum
Recorded after 2pm: www.youtube.com/nysmuseum

Attention Students, Educators, and Caregivers! Enjoy this activity with Museum Instructor, Kat Morehouse. In times like ...
04/23/2020

Attention Students, Educators, and Caregivers! Enjoy this activity with Museum Instructor, Kat Morehouse. In times like these we learn how important community is. Our community can play a huge role in our lives and remind us that we are part of something larger than ourselves.

Community can be a source of support and inspiration. An example of the possibilities that come from community partnership can be found in looking back at the artists living, working, and supporting one another in Woodstock, NY in 1926. Learn more about the historic Woodstock art colony and creating a sense of place here: http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/exhibitions/arthur-anderson-collection

Have children create a map of their community, what people and places are important to them? Brainstorm how they can participate with those people and places in a new way while we can’t be physically together.

Full Lesson:http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/common/nysm/files/historic_woodstock_education_guide_lessons_in_creating_sense_of_place_a.pdf

Address

222 Madison Ave
Albany, NY
12230

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:30 - 17:00
Thursday 09:30 - 17:00
Friday 09:30 - 17:00
Saturday 09:30 - 17:00
Sunday 09:30 - 17:00

Telephone

(518) 474-5877

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2020 Eastern States Archaeological Federation Annual Meeting Call for Papers. Submit abstracts to Program Chair, Dr. Timothy Abel.
2020 Eastern States Archaeological Federation Annual Meeting Program Announcement.
These are all online tours, yes?
I saw the PBS show that said the NYSM is the largest state museum in the USA! What we see at the museum exhibits is the tip of the iceberg of the total collections. Among its exhibits is the display of places and items that have been found from 400 years of history under the city of Albany while building new construction in the city. How many cities call for historical digs before destroying the past for new construction? And you can visit the NYSM for FREE and enjoy nearby free parking on weekends...
An interesting part of Albany history ... The Albany Free Museum.
Thought you might be interested in our new book! Get your copy of A Journey Through Time, available at the Cortland County Historical Society (25 Homer Ave. Cortland, 1-5 pm, Tuesday-Saturday) and by MAILORDER (https://drive.google.com/open?id=1IoOmf-qQgxxqOq9c4SamKUqt_o_TlYuJ). The cost is $40.50 plus tax for members, and $45.00 plus tax for non-members. See the order form link for more details. In 1958, Cortland County celebrated it's 150th anniversary with a series of events and the publication of the Cortland County Sesquicentennial Souvenir Yearbook: 1808-1958. With 8,000 copies printed, nearly every family in Cortland County purchased the book. 60 years later, and ten years after the celebration of our county's Bicentennial in 2008, the Cortland County Historical Society has published A Journey Through Time: Cortland County, 1958-2018. Three years in the making, this book picks up where the 1958 book left off and is the Society's largest publication to date continuing our long tradition of publishing Cortland County's history. Lead authors and co-editors, Jean Edwards and Liz Wavle-Brown collected stories, photographs and advertisements from over 200 people. You won't want to miss getting your copy of this collectible book, sure to be enjoyed for generations to come.
Dear New York State Museum, My name is Stephen Howe. I am an associate professor of historical linguistics in Japan but was born in England. I am researching special words for “no” and “yes” in New York State. Colonists from the East of England, where I grew up, may have brought "dow" and "jess" to the Northeast in the seventeenth century. Four hundred years later, these special words still survive. Gerald E. Lewis gives an example of "daow" in How to Talk Yankee: Did you get your deer yet? Daow, I can’t even see one. And an informant from New Hampshire gives an example of "jearse" or "jess": Hey, have you seen where the muffin tins went? Hmmmm, jearse, in the oven I think. In the East of England, we still use "dow" and "jearse" today. However, these words for “no” and “yes” are not recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary or the Survey of English Dialects. Nor were they recorded by the Linguistic Atlas of New England; but the Dictionary of American Regional English cites daow, daowd, dow, doh or day-oh in Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts and Rhode Island as well as New York State. There is also daow in New Hampshire. For “jearse" or "jess,” informants in my survey cited jass in Upstate New York and possibly Vermont, jearse in New Hampshire, and jyes or djess in Maine and Massachusetts. I am writing a book on "jess" and "dow" and would like to ask if you know or remember these words? I would be most grateful for any information you may have. I have more information about my research plus a survey that you can take online at http://yesandno.info/ Yours sincerely, Stephen Howe ============================================= Dr Stephen HOWE Associate Professor Department of English and Graduate School Fukuoka University Japan Website: http://yesandno.info/ =============================================
I made it to Seneca museum to see Gayentwahgo's, (Cornplanter's) tomahawk that you returned this year. I was told that they weren't allowed to keep it. That really doesn't make sense to me. Not as upset though considering Gayentwahgo destroyed it and all the gifts presented to him by Hanondagonyes, (Washington) prior to his passing. He destroyed his gifts because the government didn't honor the treaty. Ely Parker found and restored it. Anyhoo I am more concerned with his wampum belt. That is sacred and signifigant and should be returned because that should still be passed on to family members that are still a part of the Longhouse. The fact that you have it is wrong and disrupts family members from taking their rightful place in our governing structure. I ask again that you return it because there is a calling for our blood relatives to return to the longhouse's with their wampums! Please and thank you once again!!!!! Oh and I am a direct descendant of his in case you forgot...….
Free Archaeology Event! Kids and Adults !
Hi. Is NY In Bloom happening this year? Can’t find any information on it. Thanks
I saw that tomorrow there is a bridal expo at the museum. is the event free? my friend was told by museum staff that it is. just wanted to double check.
Thomas Kearney Travis Harkins Markus Parsley We got to take Andrew Norris to the museum. This is absolutely one of my favorite childhood memories ! We loved the exhibits. They have a Sesame street exhibit that we loved as kids. I cannot help but notice over the years the vehicles have begun to lose their luster. I would absolutely love the chance to bring these back to life AND protect them. Then the next generation can have even better memories ! Love this place !