New York State Museum

New York State Museum The New York State Museum is a center of art, science, and history dedicated to exploring the human and natural history of the state. Established in 1836, it is the oldest and largest state museum in the country.

From its beginning, the Museum has been home to some of the nation’s leading scientists, including the founders of American paleontology, ethnology, botany and mycology. Its collections rank among the finest in many fields and total more than 16 million scientific specimens and one million cultural objects. Located at the southern end of the architecturally stunning Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller Empire State Plaza in Albany, the New York State Museum welcomes visitors from across the globe and thousands of students each year. Its 100,000 square feet of exhibition space features several new exhibitions per year in addition to long term exhibitions. The Museum also offers a variety of educational public programs for learners of all ages.

Temporarily closed

#HistoryHumpday: The Federal Theatre Project During the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt enacted th...
09/16/2020

#HistoryHumpday: The Federal Theatre Project
During the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt enacted the Works Progress Administration (WPA) to give unemployed Americans jobs. One of the projects, Federal Project Number One (1935-1939) provided work opportunities for artists, writers, musicians, and theater performers.
In some instances, performers were able to be part of federally sponsored circuses, like this one advertised for May 2, 1939 in Long Island. Or this undated one called “The World’s Greatest Circus.”

There were a variety of theatre units created from the Federal Theatre Project across the country. In New York we had a main theatre unit along with units that focused on minority groups, such as the Jewish unit (called the Yiddish unit at the time) and the African American unit (called the Negro unit at the time).

The Tailor Becomes A Storekeeper (1938) by David Pinski, was performed at Daly’s Theatre on 63rd Street in NYC. This play focused on a Jewish tailor who left his job to follow his dream of being a businessman and opening a delicatessen. Through various financial struggles, and conflicts with others, he ended up back into a tailor position but within a newly created union.

The Lafayette Theatre in NYC was home to numerous plays from the African American unit, including Haiti (1938) and Androcles and the Lion (1939). Haiti was written by William Du Bois, and mixed real historical figures along with fictional characters to depict the last few months of the Haitian Revolution. Androcles, written by George Bernard Shaw, was a reinterpretation of the religious folktale with the same title. Androcles, a Christian who speaks to animals, rescues a lion and ends up being captured by the Romans. His sacrifices pay off for the better by the end the play.

#NYSM #NewYorkStateHistory #Museumathome #WPA #FederalTheatreProject

09/16/2020
Main Rotunda

Explore the State Education Building in 360 Degrees! For the next four weeks, we will release virtual tours featuring different spaces within the State Education Building. This week, join Museum Educator Carl Morrone as he highlights the building's history and the unique architectural elements of the Rotunda. Designed by renowned architect and New York City native Henry Hornbostel, the Education Building was the first major building constructed in the United States solely as a headquarters for the administration of education. https://youtu.be/JJIY1rwLAP0

Be sure to move your phone or mouse to explore and zoom in on each of the spaces below in 360 degrees while our expert guides describe their history, design, and significance.

#NYSED #NYShistory #museumathome #museumfromhome

#ScienceTuesday: Invertebrate PaleontologySea stars (or asteroids) first appeared near the beginning of the Ordovician 4...
09/15/2020

#ScienceTuesday: Invertebrate Paleontology
Sea stars (or asteroids) first appeared near the beginning of the Ordovician 435 million years ago and still thrive today. The most common fossil sea stars from New York are Middle Devonian in age or ~387 million years old.

The slabs of fossil sea stars (Devonaster) at the New York State Museum also preserve bivalves, which the sea stars were likely preying upon. Modern sea stars prey on bivalves by wrapping their arms around the bivalve and pulling it open, which can take hours or even days. As soon as the clam gets tired and opens the shell a bit, the sea star everts the stomach (turns it inside out) out of the mouth and scoops the clam meat into the stomach. Once it is broken down inside the stomach, it is sent upwards to a second stomach for further digestion.

It would be difficult to demonstrate that Devonaster was eating the bivalves preserved in the fossil slab, but the fact that they are found together in abundance suggests that this is probably what was happening.

#NYSMresearch #bivalves #seastars #invertebratepaleontology

09/14/2020
Onkwehowekah: Haudenosaunee Worldview and its influence on the American Women’s Suffrage Movement

One of the first differences settler colonists noticed about the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island (North America), was the leadership roles of women, in daily life, in negotiations with other tribes and colonies, and in ceremony. New York suffragists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Matilda Joslyn Gage were inspired and influenced by their Haudenosaunee neighbors, especially the Haudenosaunee worldview focused on the equitable treatment of men and women in society.

Join NYSM curators of history and cultural anthropology, Ashley Hopkins-Benton and Dr. Gwen Saul in conversation with special guest Michelle Schenandoah (Oneida Nation) about this significant part of women’s suffrage history, the roles of Haudenosaunee women today, and Michelle’s foundational work for Rematriation Magazine.

Watch video here: https://youtu.be/w-eio7CgESk

Additional Resources:
Rematriation - https://rematriation.com/
Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/michelle.schenandoah

One of the first differences settler colonists noticed about the Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island (North America), was the leadership roles of women, in d...

The Attica Prison Uprising: September 9-13, 1971On September 9, 1971, the incarcerated men at Attica State Correctional ...
09/13/2020

The Attica Prison Uprising: September 9-13, 1971

On September 9, 1971, the incarcerated men at Attica State Correctional Facility seized control of the prison. During the initial uprising, Corrections Officer William Quinn was fatally injured and several other prison staff are taken hostage. For four days, the men inside Attica negotiated with New York State authorities demanding redress of horrendous conditions within the prison.

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller refuses requests from all parties to visit Attica, and on September 13, 1971, orders the prison to be forcibly retaken. After the prisoners refuse to release the hostages or to surrender, tear gas is dropped by helicopter and law enforcement unleashes a near-indiscriminate barrage of nearly 2,000 rounds of ammunition.

During the assault, 39 people are killed, including 29 prisoners and 10 hostages.

In 2010, the collection of evidence recovered by the New York State Police was transferred to the New York State Museum.

If the Twin Towers were still standing, these would be merely snapshots of everyday people on their way to work in 2001....
09/11/2020

If the Twin Towers were still standing, these would be merely snapshots of everyday people on their way to work in 2001. Instead they are a historical record documenting space that no longer exists and possibly people that are no longer with us.

To learn more about the NYSM's collection of photographs documenting morning commuters entering the World Trade Center Mall weeks prior to the attacks of September 11, 2001, visit:
http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/research-collections/history/political-history/collections/wtc-commuters

09/11/2020
World Trade Center: Rescue, Recovery, Response — Gallery Tour

Join the New York State Museum’s senior historian and curator of the World Trade Center Collections, Aaron Noble, for a gallery tour of World Trade Center: Rescue, Recovery, Response. Learn about the development of the Museum’s World Trade Center Collection and creating exhibitions about this seminal moment in American history.
https://youtu.be/Y47TatyJ3Mk

Join the New York State Museum’s senior historian and curator of the World Trade Center Collections, Aaron Noble, for a gallery tour of World Trade Center: R...

#ScienceTuesday: IchthyologyWhile all of our natural history specimens have historical and scientific value, perhaps the...
09/08/2020

#ScienceTuesday: Ichthyology
While all of our natural history specimens have historical and scientific value, perhaps the most important are those specimens that have been designated as “types”. Often, these specimens are those that were used to generate the original description and naming of a species. Their importance lies in the ability of scientists to use these specimens to ensure that, as classification schemes change over the years, a particular taxonomic name can be referred to a specific specimen, or specimens, that unequivocally represent that name. Sometimes, however, particularly in descriptions from the 18th and 19th centuries, the authors either failed to identify type specimens, or those original specimens have been lost or destroyed. In all of these cases, new type specimens must be designated.

The Spottail Shiner (Notropis hudsonius), as one might guess from its species name, is one of the most numerous fish in the Hudson River. This species was described by DeWitt Clinton in 1824 between his two terms as Governor of New York State. In his description, however, Clinton did not designate any type specimens, but did indicate that his specimens were placed in the New York Lyceum of Natural history, which was destroyed by a fire in 1866. The locality information for his specimens is also vague, being given only as “Frequent at Albany, and other places on the Hudson River”. To remedy this situation, NYSM Icthyology Collection staff recently made a short trip to the Hudson River Islands State Park, near Stockport. There, they collected what they intend to designate as a new type series of specimens for the Spottail Shiner. This will help to stabilize the taxonomy of this species and will also necessitate comparisons (both morphological and genetic) of Hudson River populations to those throughout the species’ rather broad geographical range, to determine whether N. hudsonius, as currently recognized, represents a single species or multiple similar species that possess subtle but distinctive traits.

Figure 1. The southern shore of Stockport Middle Ground Island (Hudson River), which will be designated as the new type locality for the Spotfin Shiner.

Figure 2. The future neotype for Spotfin Shiner (NYSM Catalog # to be determined).

#NYSMresearch #typespecimen #ichthyology

09/04/2020
Virtual Gallery Tour: WIndows on New York

Join Museum Educator James Jenkins for a virtual guided tour of the Museum’s newest outdoor exhibit experience, Windows on New York. Get an up-close view and learn interesting facts about some of the objects on display. Anyone can visit the entire exhibit in-person outside on the 4th floor terrace of the Cultural Education Building. For more information, visit www.nysm.nysed.gov/windows

#MuseumAtHome #MuseumFromHome #OnlineLearning #gallerytour

#ThrowbackThursday: Theodore Roosevelt at the New York State MuseumThe NYSM occupied the State Education Building from 1...
09/03/2020

#ThrowbackThursday: Theodore Roosevelt at the New York State Museum
The NYSM occupied the State Education Building from 1912-1976 before moving into its current location in the Cultural Education Building. On December 29, 1916, former President Theodore Roosevelt hosted dedication ceremonies for the Museum's newly constructed building. "A museum of this character," he stated, "has more than one function to fulfill. It must present to the people as a whole in vivid and yet truthful form, knowledge of the natural objects of our countryside…in such a fashion as to be readily understood."

Stay tuned throughout the month of September as the NYSM will release themed virtual tours of the New York State Education Building that will allow you to explore its architectural and historic features in 360 degrees!

#NYSED #MuseumAtHome #TheodoreRoosevelt

Today at 5:30pm! Join NYSM curator of Ethnography, Gwendolyn Saul, in partnership with Preservation Long Island, for the...
09/03/2020
Curator Conversations: Indigenous History & Art at Good Little Water Place

Today at 5:30pm! Join NYSM curator of Ethnography, Gwendolyn Saul, in partnership with Preservation Long Island, for the online event, “Curator Conversation: Indigenous History and Art at Good Little Water Place”.
Register online here:
https://preservationlongisland.org/curator-conversations-indigenous-history-art-at-good-little-water-place/

In 2019, photographer and artist Jeremy Dennis (Shinnecock) and curator Gwen Saul (NYSM) teamed up with Preservation Long Island to showcase contemporary Indigenous art past and present, distinct to Sewanhaky or what is now known as Long Island. The online exhibit includes a peak at collections from Preservation Long Island, the Southold Museum, and the Contemporary Native Art Collection at NYSM. Join us for a conversation (via zoom) about the Native art world and emerging and established Indigenous artists of Sewanhaky (Long Island), including Tohanash Tarrant, Tecumseh Ceaser, Camille Seaman, Courtney Leonard, Lydia Wallace-Chavez, Durell Hunter, and David Martine.
#MuseumatHome #MuseumfromHome #onlinelearning #ethnography
@preservationlongisland

To celebrate the launch of the virtual exhibition, Indigenous History & Art at Good Little Water Place, join artist Jeremy Dennis (Shinnecock) and curator Gwen Saul (New York State Museum) for …

#ScienceTuesday: Geology & Museum History2020 marks the 150th Anniversary of the New York State Museum! The roots of the...
09/01/2020

#ScienceTuesday: Geology & Museum History
2020 marks the 150th Anniversary of the New York State Museum! The roots of the Museum lie in the 1836 establishment of a New York State Natural History Survey comprised of geologists, biologists, paleontologists, and agriculturalists. They travelled the state, reported what they found, and collected samples. These samples became the core of future New York State Museum Collections.

The science of the early New York State geologists, including James Hall, was of global significance. The “father of modern geology”, Sir Charles Lyell of England, visited the NY geologists in 1841, and said “The Helderberg outcrops [the area of today’s Thacher State Park] must be known to every geologist if he were to understand his science.”

Another significant early geologist from Europe, Louis Agassiz, said in 1856 “When European men of science come to this country their first question is: ‘Which way is Albany?’”

Most of the photographs included here date from the 1860s-1910s and are from the Geological and Agricultural Hall, the first building constructed for the sole purpose of housing the collections of New York State. Also included is an image of notable paleontologist, James Hall, who was a founding member of the Geological Survey and who became the NYSM's first director. The final image is of the Mine Lot Falls of John Boyd Thacher Park.

08/28/2020
Summer Fun Friday: Invisible Ink

Here it is....the last installment of the Summer Fun Friday Virtual Series, as well as the Museum's Virtual Summer Programming! Thank you for tuning in!

Today's demo is Invisible Ink! So gather up your supplies and take a look to make your own secret messages!

Craft Supplies:
White Construction Paper
Baking Soda
Water
Rubbing Alcohol
Ground Turmeric
Q-tips
Paintbrush
Measuring Spoons

Stay tuned for more upcoming virtual programs from the State Museum in the weeks to come! If you have any interests in programming that you would like to share, feel free to post your idea below, or email us at [email protected]!

Have you ever wanted to send your friend a secret message only they could read? You’re not alone! Join us to learn about invisible ink and how you can make i...

08/27/2020
Deep Rocks - A Trip to the Museum’s Bedrock Core Collection

Today's Virtual Field Trip takes you on a tour of the NYSM's Bedrock Core Collection! These long cylinders of rock are collected from deep in the earth using special drill bits. The collection is very important for geologists to identify and study rock units that are not exposed at the surface. Join collections manager, Brian Slater, as he discusses these amazing rocks and how they are collected and used by geologists.

#MuseumAtHome #MuseumFromHome #Geology #NYSMresearch

On Thursday, September 3 at 5:30 p.m., join NYSM curator of Ethnography, Gwendolyn Saul, in partnership with Preservatio...
08/27/2020
Curator Conversations: Indigenous History & Art at Good Little Water Place

On Thursday, September 3 at 5:30 p.m., join NYSM curator of Ethnography, Gwendolyn Saul, in partnership with Preservation Long Island, for the online event, “Curator Conversation: Indigenous History and Art at Good Little Water Place”.
Register online here:
https://preservationlongisland.org/curator-conversations-indigenous-history-art-at-good-little-water-place/

In 2019, photographer and artist Jeremy Dennis (Shinnecock) and curator Gwen Saul (NYSM) teamed up with Preservation Long Island to showcase contemporary Indigenous art past and present, distinct to Sewanhaky or what is now known as Long Island. The online exhibit includes a peak at collections from Preservation Long Island, the Southold Museum, and the Contemporary Native Art Collection at NYSM. Join us for a conversation (via zoom) about the Native art world and emerging and established Indigenous artists of Sewanhaky (Long Island), including Tohanash Tarrant, Tecumseh Ceaser, Camille Seaman, Courtney Leonard, Lydia Wallace-Chavez, Durell Hunter, and David Martine.

#MuseumatHome #MuseumfromHome #onlinelearning #ethnography
@preservationlongisland

To celebrate the launch of the virtual exhibition, Indigenous History & Art at Good Little Water Place, join artist Jeremy Dennis (Shinnecock) and curator Gwen Saul (New York State Museum) for …

08/26/2020
Women of Science: Fossils in the Field with Dr. Lisa Amati, Sarita Morse, and Kathleen Bonk

Enjoy today’s Women of Science video from the field with State Paleontologist Dr. Lisa Amati and collections technicians Sarita Morse and Kathleen Bonk as they show how they collect fossils, research the area they are studying, and conduct work outside. Learn about the process of collection and hands-on research that helps the New York State Museum increase collections, make discoveries, and share the rich and exciting paleontological history of New York State with you!
https://youtu.be/EWu1vCgdnzs

#museumathome #museumfromhome #onlinelearning #womenofscience #fieldwork

What do scientists do when they are “out in the field”? Enjoy this video from the field with State Paleontogist Dr. Lisa Amati and collections technicians Sa...

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I curated the following eight Climate Change themed digital art shows which were registered UN World Environment, Oceans, Desertification, Clean Air for Blue Skies Days digital events and were published by over ninety museums in over 30 countries around the world: 1. Atelier Teymur Rzayev First Digital Climate Change Art Show : https://www.mocc.cuhk.edu.hk/en-gb/hub-categories/news-and-developments/item/2256-atelier-teymur-rzayev-s-first-digital-climate-change-art-show-pinelo-art-gallery-20200527 2. Clean Air for Blue Skies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AWkoqcSuQsI&fbclid=IwAR18z3ctNhxbLEaRP11F93agwJSu7f202cgfAkAmS9NDzxgZN4xVtISjy5U 3. Breathe Life: https://www.facebook.com/cem.ustuner.94/posts/10163905511110391?notif_id=1598515353301985¬if_t=tagged_with_story&ref=notif 4. COVID-19: Selva Ozelli “Art in the Time of Corona”: https://www.facebook.com/527889230574675/posts/3281134275250143/ ; 5. Urbanization: Serife Akkan "One Door One Hundred Trees" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT2snjDDVgc; 6. Biodiversity: Fatma Kadir "Bird Watching": https://www.facebook.com/522330390/posts/10163474037080391/?d=w 7. Biodiversity: Fatma Kadir "Bird Watchingn2": : https://www.facebook.com/cem.ustuner.94/posts/10163896871225391?notif_id=1598342742706547¬if_t=tagged_with_story&ref=notif 8. Artic Melting: Semine Hazar "Sea Watcher": https://m.facebook.com/watch/?v=252274439370698
"Surviving the Jungle of Corona" - Portrait of Dr. Zubeyde Arat-Akdogan @TRTWorldCitizen#TheFrontline #VisualContest
I curated the following five Climate Change themed digital art shows which were registered UN World Environment, Oceans and Desertification Day digital events and were published by over thirty museums around the world: 1. Atelier Teymur Rzayev First Digital Climate Change Art Show : https://www.mocc.cuhk.edu.hk/en-gb/hub-categories/news-and-developments/item/2256-atelier-teymur-rzayev-s-first-digital-climate-change-art-show-pinelo-art-gallery-20200527; 2. COVID-19: Selva Ozelli “Art in the Time of Corona”: https://www.facebook.com/527889230574675/posts/3281134275250143/ ; 3. Urbanization: Serife Akkan "One Door One Hundred Trees" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MT2snjDDVgc; 4. Biodiversity: Fatma Kadir "Bird Watching": https://www.facebook.com/522330390/posts/10163474037080391/?d=w; 5. Artic Melting: Semine Hazar "Sea Watcher": https://m.facebook.com/watch/?v=252274439370698
Made Her Mark - Portrait of Dr. Kalbiye Yalaz who established the first pediatric neurology department at Hacettepe Hospital in Ankara, Turkey, Kalbiye Yalaz, Hacettepe, Hacettepe University Hacettepe Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Çocuk Nöroloji Hacettepe Nöroloji Yoğun Bakım, TRT World Citizen, #frontlineheroes Selva Ozelli Art Voice of Specially Abled People
are you guys open for visitors
Actor Mark Sepanski is in the TV Show Elementary Pushing Buttons 2018, Mark was Filming for 2 days in 2017 on Long Island New York with the Huntington Militia. Mark is the Founder and President at THE PEOPLE'S MUSEUM and Founder and President at HAMMER PICTURES.
Actor Mark Sepanski is in the Movie Sweet Liberty 1986, with Alan Alda Mark was Filming for 8 days with Alan Alda in 1985 on Long Island New York Mark is the Founder and President at THE PEOPLE'S MUSEUM and Founder and President at HAMMER PICTURES.