Esther Massry Gallery at St. Rose

Esther Massry Gallery at St. Rose The Esther Massry Gallery exhibits significant and thought-provoking contemporary art. As a Teaching

11/02/2021
11/02/2021
In case you missed it...in Fall '20, the Esther Massry Gallery exhibited an inclusive selection of 22 modern and contemp...
06/04/2021

In case you missed it...in Fall '20, the Esther Massry Gallery exhibited an inclusive selection of 22 modern and contemporary artists curated by Stephen J. Tyson, celebrating diverse heritages and envisioning new futures.

Check out the captivating curator-led video tour of the exhibition Engage: Artists in Visual Dialogue!

The exhibition featured the work of Adál, Marcus K. Anderson, Anthony Barboza, Royal G. Brown Jr., Roger Cabán, Sue Clark, Francelise Dawkins, Roy DeCarava, Louis Draper, Juan Genovés, Daesha Devón Harris, Joe Harris, Jacqueline Lake-Sample, Fern Logan, Obaro, Ted Pontiflet, Alisa Sikelianos-Carter, Coreen Simpson, David Tyson, James Van Der Zee, Takeyce Walter, Elizabeth Zunon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e6FqbKAi1ZE

Curator Stephen J. Tyson leads a tour of the “Engage: Artists in Visual Dialogue” presented by the Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose, Octobe...

04/09/2021

The 2021 Senior Class Exhibition opens today at noon. If you are in the Albany area, stop by the Esther Massry Gallery to see the work of out talented Seniors. Virtual opening tonight via Zoom; registration link is:

https://strose.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJclduuvrjgvGNfWdcYnogZFqeS6neOUutjI

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

03/26/2021

Celebrate our Seniors!
Announcing the Class of 2021 Senior Exhibition
April 9-May 1, 2021
The Esther Massry Gallery, located on The College of Saint Rose campus, welcomes the Class of 2021 Art & Design Senior Exhibition, which runs Friday, April 9 through Saturday, May 1. The exhibition includes the creative work of eighteen Class of 2021 Studio Art, Graphic Design, and Design Media Arts graduates of the NASAD-accredited programs of The Center for Art & Design.
Poster design: Meghan Tomisman
.design .art .design @01.24.99

Thank you David Brickman for your generous review of "Earthly, " on view until March 17.https://dbgetvisual.blogspot.com...
03/08/2021

Thank you David Brickman for your generous review of "Earthly, " on view until March 17.

https://dbgetvisual.blogspot.com/

Things seen and heard on the Capital Region art scene and beyond

⭐⭐Featured in this week's Chronicle ⭐⭐⭐⭐⁠⁠"Massry Gallery celebrates art and poetry with a reading by Barbara Ungar"⁠⁠By...
02/17/2021

⭐⭐Featured in this week's Chronicle ⭐⭐⭐⭐⁠

"Massry Gallery celebrates art and poetry with a reading by Barbara Ungar"⁠

By BRIANA SPINA⁠
Layout Editor⁠

"Poet and Saint Rose English professor Barbara Ungar brought life to the “Earthly” exhibition now on display at the Esther Massry Gallery. She read poetry from her recently published works, “Save Our Ship” and “EDGE,” in a Zoom event on Feb. 9 that garnered an audience of 75 from as nearby as Albany to as far as California and Brazil. All of Ungar’s works can be found at barbaraungar.net."⁠

http://www.strosechronicle.com/fresh/massry-gallery-celebrates-art-and-poetry-with-a-reading-by-barbara-ungar/

Massry Gallery celebrates art and poetry with a reading by Barbara Ungar Barbara Ungar reads her poetry to an audience of 75 over Zoom on Feb. 9. She read from her collections “Save Our Ship” and “EDGE,” both of which can be purchased at barbaraungar.net./ Briana Spina Posted By: chronicle@s...

Paper, Styrofoam, old painting palettes—Tamara Zahaykevich collects and combines these materials until they start to sug...
02/12/2021

Paper, Styrofoam, old painting palettes—Tamara Zahaykevich collects and combines these materials until they start to suggest relationships and, eventually, a form. But she doesn’t stop there. Even a work that is seemingly finished may whisper new desires—to be remade, appended, and transformed. Zahaykevich’s forms seem to melt into, slither around, and hint at engulfing the pedestals they inhabit. Says the artist, “Letting the hands do the work, instead of the mind, often leads the way to surprising solutions.”

Tamara Zahaykevich is a contemporary artist who currently lives and works in East Chatham, NY. Her work has been featured in numerous exhibitions at galleries including:



Message

Message


and many more...
See Tamara Zahaykevich’s work on view now at the Esther Massry Gallery, The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12202
Mon-Sat, 12-5; Wed and Thu open til 8

For Odessa Straub, the hands-on maintenance of her sculptural work becomes an ongoing ritual or performance. Straub’s ne...
02/11/2021

For Odessa Straub, the hands-on maintenance of her sculptural work becomes an ongoing ritual or performance. Straub’s newest work includes actual water-submerged plants so the need to care for them is literal. This vital energy makes the work itself come alive as elements transfer states between water and v***r, circulate through various orifices, and maintain life.
Odessa Straub was born in Brooklyn, New York where she currently lives and works. Recent exhibitions include shows at:
 


la

..and many more
See Odessa Straub’s work on view now at the Esther Massry Gallery, The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12202
Mon-Sat, 12-5; Wed and Thu open til 8
 

Laleh Khorramian’s animation “I Without End,” 2008 looks to cinema for its dramatic tension, but the main figures—human-...
02/10/2021

Laleh Khorramian’s animation “I Without End,” 2008 looks to cinema for its dramatic tension, but the main figures—human-like orange peels that lounge, embrace, have sex—are rendered through stop-motion animation. Stop-motion alters our perception of time; the orange peels take days to bend and curl, but as the camera editing speeds up the action, the two characters invite the viewer into an intricate and intimate dance of human-like relations. In a time when the possibilities for passionate communion are at an ebb, Khorramian’s work invites us to ponder our own ardent longings.
Laleh Khorramian was born in Tehran, Iran and lives and works in upstate New York. Khorramian has exhibited internationally, including shows at:






..and many more
See Laleh Khorramian’s work on view now at the Esther Massry Gallery, The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12202
Mon-Sat, 12-5; Wed and Thu open til 8

Meg Lipke’s works are marked by sutures and scars—wounds that have been tended to and healed. Coming from a lineage of B...
02/10/2021

Meg Lipke’s works are marked by sutures and scars—wounds that have been tended to and healed. Coming from a lineage of British textile factory owners and textile artists, Lipke maintains a storied and intimate relationship with her materials. Upending the traditional role of the canvas as a flat or neutral surface, these stuffed hybrids of painting and sculpture echo and invite the human form as they flop and lean, pillow and bulge. 
Meg Lipke lives and works in New York’s Hudson Valley. Her work has been exhibited at 


Burlington City Arts




..and many more
See Meg Lipke’s work on view now at the Esther Massry Gallery, The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12202
Mon-Sat, 12-5; Wed and Thu open til 8




Julie Evans’s pools of ink are caught mid-flow; we imagine them becoming both what they are and what they might be next....
02/08/2021

Julie Evans’s pools of ink are caught mid-flow; we imagine them becoming both what they are and what they might be next. Creating shapes out of ink on mylar, Evans cuts and collages these shapes back together. She improvises as a jazz musician might, inventing ever-changing compositions with mylar that morph from one form into another. Here, for the exhibition Earthly, she situates smaller works—isolated in their frames—within a large installation of organic configurations on the gallery walls. 

Julie Evans is a native New Yorker who has been living and working in since 2011. For the past 25 years she has been exhibiting her paintings and drawings extensively in both the US and abroad. Solo and group exhibitions include those at:



The Weatherspoon Art Museum




..and many others

See Julie Evans’s work on view now at the Esther Massry Gallery, The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12202
Mon-Sat, 12-5; Wed and Thu open til 8

Recording of Thursday, January 28th's "Earthly" panel discussion with artists Julie Evans, Meg Lipke, and Tamara Zahayke...
02/05/2021

Recording of Thursday, January 28th's "Earthly" panel discussion with artists Julie Evans, Meg Lipke, and Tamara Zahaykevich, moderated by Susan Meyer https://youtu.be/Y9cofoDNqnI

Artists Julie Evans, Meg Lipke, and Tamara Zahaykevich speak with Earthly co-curator Susan Meyer.Earthly, curated by Susan Meyer and Erin Sickler, is on view...

"In “Earthly,” struggle and decay battle resilience and beauty. The title, fittingly, is as abrupt as the show itself, a...
02/03/2021

"In “Earthly,” struggle and decay battle resilience and beauty. The title, fittingly, is as abrupt as the show itself, and as open ended...." --William Jaeger, Times Union

Thank you Albany Times Union for your review 🙌🏼 of "Earthly" at the Esther Massry Gallery at St. Rose

Gallery hours are Monday-Saturday, 12-5; open late Wednesday and Thursday until 8.

https://www.timesunion.com/entertainment/article/At-the-Massry-exhibit-s-art-imitates-life-15913634.php

Much of “Earthly,” a thematic exhibit at the College of Saint Rose's Massry Center in...

Earthly: Virtual Artist ConversationThu, Jan 28, 7pmA conversation between artists Julie Evans, Meg Lipke, and Tamara Z...
01/21/2021

Earthly: Virtual Artist Conversation
Thu, Jan 28, 7pm

A conversation between artists Julie Evans, Meg Lipke, and Tamara Zahaykevich, moderated by Earthly co-curator and Saint Rose Associate Professor of Art Susan Meyer.

REGISTER TO GET ZOOM LINK AT: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/earthly-virtual-artist-conversation-tickets-137836792557

In association with:

Earthly
January 22 - March 17, 2021

Earthly is not a landscape show as the title might imply, but more about the body, our terrestrial selves, and the sensual. The themes of Earthly were originally determined in a pre-pandemic world, but as COVID-19 took over, these themes became more pronounced. The artists in Earthly cycle through, tend to, revisit, and renegotiate materials, even returning to remake or reconfigure the same piece again and again. In this way, they speak to the flexibility and openness to process that we all are called to embrace in these uncertain times.

Artists: Julie Evans, Laleh Khorramian, Meg Lipke, Odessa Straub, and Tamara Zahaykevich

Earthly is co-curated by Saint Rose Associate Professor of Art Susan Meyer and Esther Massry Gallery Manager Erin Sickler

PLEASE JOIN US TO CELEBRATE THE OPENING OF EARTHLY!Artists: Julie Evans, Laleh Khorramian, Meg Lipke, Odessa Straub and ...
01/12/2021

PLEASE JOIN US TO CELEBRATE THE OPENING OF EARTHLY!

Artists: Julie Evans, Laleh Khorramian, Meg Lipke, Odessa Straub and Tamara Zahaykevich

The artists in "Earthly" cycle through, tend to, revisit and renegotiate materials, even returning to remake or reconfigure the same piece again and again. In this way, they speak to the flexibility and openness to process that we all are called to embrace in these uncertain times.

Co-curated by Associate Professor of Art Susan Meyer and Esther Massry Gallery Manager Erin Sickler.

*****
Watch our page for more information about related Earthly events, including Zoom links, or email the gallery at [email protected]

Gallery hours are by appointment until February 1st, after which time we will resume regular hours. Monday through Saturday from noon to 5 p.m.; Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 8 p.m.; closed Sunday.

Due to Covid-19 restrictions, the Massry Center for the Arts is locked. Gallery visitors must call 518-337-2930 to gain access. Masks and social distancing required.

WHERE: Esther Massry Gallery, Massry Center for the Arts at The College of Saint Rose, 1002 Madison Avenue, Albany, NY 12208.

WHEN: The exhibit runs Friday, January 22 through Wednesday, March 17.
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Looking Back: 2014-2015Featured Artist: Daniella DoolingFrom October 5 through December 7, the Esther Massry Gallery at ...
01/08/2021

Looking Back: 2014-2015
Featured Artist: Daniella Dooling

From October 5 through December 7, the Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose presented an exhibition of the artist Daniella Dooling entitled, “Bloody Dick Road in the Big Hole Valley: Files from the Girl in Room 10.” The exhibition featured sculpture, cultural artifacts and documents, personal effects and ephemera, an archive collection of memorabilia and a video.

According to the 2014 Press Release:

“‘Bloody Dick Road in the Big Hole Valley: Files from the Girl in Room 10’ is a multi-media project that takes a variety of forms...

Dooling states, ‘In the repetition of saying what has already been said, moments from childhood take on a state of immemorial forgetfulness. In that forgetfulness, what has been forgotten is no longer purely individual; it joins human collectives that have a primal commonality. Remnants of memories become content and material--personal iconography morphs into a communal diaspora of desires. Precious memorabilia safely cherished over the years mingle with those provided by a simple PayPal click on eBay. Collective memories reunite once again through online commerce. Oddly, pedestrian and peculiarly personal interactions occur with strangers scattered all over the globe through the transactions these exchanges of objects demand...’

The site-specific installation, ‘3459 Macomb Street,’ located in the 27 ft. high Vertical Gallery involves dozens of tangled fire escape ladders, boom boxes and cassette recorders with overlapping voices reading front he artist’s personal collection of medical notes, diary entries and letters, creating a chaotic and disorienting, dream-like experience.

Also featured is the video installation, ‘Time for Me to Fly.'
Image: Bloody Dick Road in the Big Hole Valley: Files from the Girl in Room 10, installation view at Esther Massry Gallery

Looking Back: 2013-2014Featured Artist: Judy Linn, featuring photographs of Patti SmithFrom January 26 to February 28, 2...
12/30/2020

Looking Back: 2013-2014
Featured Artist: Judy Linn, featuring photographs of Patti Smith

From January 26 to February 28, 2014, the Esther Massry Gallery presented, “My Land/Patti Smith and Other Things/Photographs by Judy Linn,” showcasing photographs from her then-recent publication issued by Abrams Image, New York).

According to curator Jeanne Flanagan, “Smith and Linn developed an enduring friendship in their early 20s as collaborators. Linn was obsessed with the medium of photography and Smith was obsessed with being photographed. Linn’s images of Smith range from the vulnerable and girlish to iconic and edgy. The young [Robert] Mapplethorpe, who shared a close relationship with Smith, also is featured before his rise to fame as a photographer.

Linn received her bachelor of fine arts degree from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, N.Y., and went on to work as an aspiring photographer. While at Pratt, she met Mapplethorpe and became acquainted with the struggling young poet Smith. Their ensuing friendship over the next seven years resulted in more than 200 rolls of film and thousands of images of Smith and friends including the young Sam Shepard, American Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. Many were taken at the Chelsea Hotel, where Mapplethorpe and Smith lived.”

“‘I love her pictures of life as it is happening to Smith and Mapplethorpe...there’s a Rossellini realness mixed with an ‘intelligent young person’s of the 1920s need to pose as a viable part of self expression.’ Hilton Als, The New Yorker, April 4, 2011.”

“In the early ’70s, Linn returned to Detroit with Smith to work as a roaming photojournalist for Detroit Area Weekly News and Crawdaddy magazine, where Smith wrote rock criticism. This experience as a young newspaper photographer provided the subject matter for the Detroit suite of photographs on exhibit…
..Back in New York City, Linn continued as a photographer for the Village Voice along with James Hamilton and Darryl and Sylvia Plachy. She also pursued her artistic work and went on to exhibit widely in museums and galleries across the United States and countries worldwide.”
Image: “Patti with Bolex,” 1969

Looking Back: 2013-2014Featured Artist: Charlotta WestergrenIn the Fall ‘13 semester, the Esther Massry Gallery featured...
12/23/2020

Looking Back: 2013-2014
Featured Artist: Charlotta Westergren
In the Fall ‘13 semester, the Esther Massry Gallery featured a solo exhibition of painter Charlotta Westergren, featuring a number of works on paper, linen, lamé, and aluminum accompanied by a video shot on location at a vineyard in Provence.

From the Press Release:

“Charlotta Westergren works in a variety of mediums including installation, video, and primarily painting. Her psychologically acute work explores our relationship with time, and the increasing difficulty of stopping and slowing it in the modern age. The artist employs symbolism, history and tradition to explore contemporary concerns. She draws on Old Master techniques going back to great Flemish works of the Northern Renaissance. The Flemish painters used the precision of their painting as a way of understanding the natural world that was so inexplicable. She says that when she creates her work she is communing with the great artists of history and a tradition stretching hundreds of years.”

“Her work, however, also draws from the nuances of her own family history and both adult and childhood memories. The psychological acuity of her work is often cited; The Huffington Post describes the figures in her work as ‘isolated, vulnerable, and wounded.’ The New York Times has called Westergren’s work self aware and ‘sweet but tense.’ Often it operates on several levels, not just psychologically, but visually, playing with scale, texture and material. In a superficial, screen-obsessed and multi-tasking world, Westergren’s work aims to draw out deeper emotional responses, from dislocation to joy.”
Image: War on Terror, oil on linen, 72" x 60", 2012.

Looking Back: 2012-2013Featured Artists: Janet Biggs, Elise Engler, and Itty S. NeuhausFrom January 20 to March 1, 2013,...
12/18/2020

Looking Back: 2012-2013
Featured Artists: Janet Biggs, Elise Engler, and Itty S. Neuhaus

From January 20 to March 1, 2013, the Esther Massry Gallery presented “BiPOLAR JOURNEYS: To The Ends of the Earth,” a group exhibition of artists Janet Biggs, Elise Engler and Itty S. Neuhaus. A multimedia exhibition, the show explored works inspired by sojourns to the Arctic, Antarctica, and Newfoundland and sparked questions about ecological sustainability.

According to the exhibition brochure (pictured here):

“Janet Biggs is known primarily for her conceptual work in video, photography and performance. She explores the tense relationships between athleticism and human ambition, individualism and community, free will and control, gender and sexual stereotypes, ultimately challenging the restraints that cultural systems impose. The artist spent almost three months in the Arctic Circle to create Arctic Trilogy, featuring three single-channel videos.”

“Elise Engler’s miniature serial drawings, paintings, books and video animation document her entire journey to Antarctica. The artist spent two months accompanying scientists on ‘the ice’ creating her visual timelines after winning the National Science Foundation Antarctic Artists and Writers Award. Locations include McMurdo Station, penguin colonies at Cape Royds and Cape Crozier, the Dry Valleys and the South Pole.”

“The mysteries held in the depths of the sea and the expanses of the sky are the subject of two multi-media installations, ‘Understory’ and ‘Vertical Void’ by Itty S. Neuhaus. The work addresses geological and environmental concerns as observed in subarctic landscapes. The artist received a Fulbright Fellowship to Labrador and Newfoundland where she was artist-in-residence at Gros Morne National Park.”

.neuhaus

Looking Back: 2011-2012⁠Featured Artist: Ellen Driscoll⁠⁠From September 23 through December 9, 2012, the Esther Massry G...
12/11/2020

Looking Back: 2011-2012⁠
Featured Artist: Ellen Driscoll⁠⁠
From September 23 through December 9, 2012, the Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose hosted an exhibition of the work of Ellen Driscoll entitled "Core Sample." The exhibition featured a suspended sculpture assembled from recycled plastic bottles, large-scale works on paper and handmade books. ⁠

From the 2012 Press Release:⁠

“Ellen Driscoll’s sculptures, drawings and installations explore resource consumption and material lineage related to the controversial subject of global warming. The artist employs recycled plastic bottles to construct her sculpture and exploits the inherent qualities of the material, which serve to inform the work. She appropriates thousands of mass-produced bottles from recycling plants and dumpsites. The material is then cut up and reconstructed into architectural forms that are colorless, almost weightless and lack solidity. The completed objects and sculptural installations reflect back on the history of oil as a natural resource while projecting forward into a world where resource consumption leads to disaster.” ⁠⁠
“Driscoll employs a bird’s-eye-view by creating microcosmic worlds where everything is in miniature, emphasizing our planet’s fragile ecology. The artist states, ‘It’s all about scale really, and everything is connected in a continuum. In other words, the global is personal, and part of what I am trying to do in the new work is to connect the dots between the far-flung consequences of intimate daily acts that seem inconsequential---like sipping water out of a plastic bottle.’⁠⁠
Image: “Core Sample” installation view at the Esther Massry Gallery. ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

We are so sad to hear of the death of Nuyorican artist ADÁL (1948-2020).  Here is his piece 'Un Problema con la Conversa...
12/10/2020

We are so sad to hear of the death of Nuyorican artist ADÁL (1948-2020).
Here is his piece 'Un Problema con la Conversación' recently featured in our exhibition Engage: Artists in Visual Dialogue, curated by Stephen Tyson.
Adál, Un Problema con la Conversación, 1976, Gelatin silver print, 7 x 5 ⅜ inches, Courtesy of New York State Harlem Art Collection/New York State Office of General Services, © Adál Maldonado, 1976.
Text from the exhibition:
"In a darkened room, ADÁL left the shutter of his camera open while scribing in the air with a flashlight the words “a problem with the conversation” in Spanish. This titular problem is represented by the seated artist whose mouth is tethered to his fingers by marionette strings. The transparency of a woman’s legs entering from the left suggests this would-be interlocutor is only a memory. Using the intimately surreal photographs with handwritten narratives by Duane Michals as a point of departure, ADÁL explores personal identity while acknowledging, in the artist’s words, “the impossibility of ever achieving a definitive picture of one's self.” Engaged in the Nuyorican movement of artists, poets, writers, and musicians in New York, ADÁL was equally concerned with cultural identity and Puerto Rico’s political status. In the decades after the island became a US commonwealth in 1952, many residents migrated to New York, establishing what came to be known as El Barrio."

12/07/2020

This Wed, Dec 9, 7pmEST: Join The College of Saint Rose associate professor Robert R. Shane for a live conversation with artist Kyoung eun Kang and Daisy Murray-Holman, daughter of Elizabeth Murray, as they discuss Kang's work in the exhibition Traces completed at the Elizabeth Murray Residency Program and on view at Collar Works, Troy, NY.
Register free here: https://strose.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAqdeqqqDIjGdBx3sWOI8r892rFLtMozyIE
Learn more about Kang's Traces here: http://collarworks.org/exhibitions

.Looking Back: 2010-2011Featured Artist: Rob SwainstonFrom February 4th through March 20th, 2011, the Esther Massry Gall...
12/04/2020

.
Looking Back: 2010-2011
Featured Artist: Rob Swainston

From February 4th through March 20th, 2011, the Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose hosted the exhibition “PLEXUS,” showcasing the work of New York-based artist and printmaker Rob Swainston.

According to the artist, the title of the exhibition, PLEXUS, describes “a dense convergence of networks, an intersection place, and a conduit of multiplicities.” He goes on, “While all the parts of a plexus are linked, a plexus does not synthesize, order, or homogenize its components. ‘PLEXUS’ is comprised of five parts: ‘Propositions,’ ‘Mirrors,’ ‘Machines,’ ‘Mountain,’ and ‘Cascade.’ While all the parts are linked, each component of the plexus has a different set of attractors at work--attractors that germinate order, pattern, structure, and sense out of what would otherwise appear to be a chaotic mishmash of dissociated and reassembled imagery.”

“‘Propositions’ is inspired by Robert Rauchenberg’s ‘Combines’ and Deleuzian architectural theory. The series consists of multiple mixed-media works that merge traditional printmaking processes--such as lithography, woodcut, and silkscreen--with digital photography and printing to create a torrent of visual information and energy, all compressed into uniform 24” x 32” x 1” boxes.”

“‘Mirrors’ consists of installations on the gallery ceiling viewed through mirrors on the floor.”

“‘Machines--four 10’ x 15’ woodblock prints--follow two interrelated trajectories based on advances in image representation and the pseudohistorical notion of ‘Course of Empire’ that originated in 19th century American popular history.”

‘Cascade,’ three 24-foot-long ceiling-to-floor scrolls, demonstrates that the same information blocks used in ‘Machines’ can be recoded to fit another narrative.”

And finally…

“‘Mountain,’ a performance video presented on a small monitor coupled with one drawing, mimics a calm domestic environment.”
Image: “PLEXUS,” installation view at the Esther Massry Gallery, 2011.

12/02/2020

Wed, Dec 9, 7pmEST: Join The College of Saint Rose associate professor Robert R. Shane for a live conversation with artist Kyoung Eun Kang and Daisy Murray-Holman, daughter of Elizabeth Murray, as they discuss Kang's work in the exhibition Traces completed at the Elizabeth Murray Residency Program and on view at Collar Works, Troy, NY.
Register free here: https://strose.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAqdeqqqDIjGdBx3sWOI8r892rFLtMozyIE
Learn more about Kang's Traces here: http://collarworks.org/exhibitions

11/23/2020

Artist Edra Soto in conversation with art critic Robert R. Shane Poetry by Spencer Diaz Tootle Recorded November 19, 2020 Presented by the Center for Art & D...

Looking Back: 2010-2011Featured Artist: Lee Boroson and Kirsten HassenfeldFrom September 19 through October 3, 2010, the...
11/20/2020

Looking Back: 2010-2011
Featured Artist: Lee Boroson and Kirsten Hassenfeld

From September 19 through October 3, 2010, the Esther Massry Gallery at The College of Saint Rose hosted the exhibition “States of Matter” showcasing New York City artists Lee Boroson and Kirsten Hassenfeld.

From the 2010 Saint Rose exhibition Press Release:

“Since 1994, Lee Boroson has been recognized for his inflatable sculptures that refer to architecture, science and nature. His suspended, sewn nylon forms filled with air are light and whimsical, representing elemental forces like water, ice and smoke. Smaller related works complete the environment such as a waterfall, ice flow and Koi pond. Together, the sculptures create an allegorical narrative by casting a cultural lens on what is perceived “natural.” For Boroson, 'Landscape is a construct, a very particular point of reference to view the natural world.' He states, ‘In creating these works, I face the impossible task of capturing natural phenomena that are visually “real” yet substantively ineffable, transient or evanescent…'

Kirsten Hassenfeld frames the tension between the decorative and fine arts as a parallel to the concept of nature. The artist states, ‘I have long been disturbed by the obstinacy of matter. What we hope is permanent (art) is always in jeopardy of falling apart, while what we hope will degrade or disappear (trash) seems to hang on forever.’ In response to this dilemma, Hassenfeld employs found objects as raw material. Her forms are drawn from the decorative arts, constructed from small ornamental and utilitarian objects found in thrift stores, gutters and junk drawers. Assorted buttons, bottle-caps, spools, crockery, napkin rings and glassware are piled one atop the other, or suspended in the air to reveal complex symmetrical forms, reminiscent of historic tabletop ornaments or a floating, v***rous city in the sky.

Address

1002 Madison Avenue
Albany, NY
12208

Opening Hours

Monday 12pm - 5pm
Tuesday 12pm - 5pm
Wednesday 12pm - 8pm
Thursday 12pm - 8pm
Friday 12pm - 5pm
Saturday 12pm - 5pm

Telephone

+15184853902

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