T.G.Green & Co Ltd Pottery - Church Gresley Archives

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T.G.Green & Co Ltd Pottery - Church Gresley Archives The archives of Church Gresley pottery T.G.Green & Co Ltd 1864 - 2007 This page is not for promoting so called 'collectors groups'.
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A living archive centre holding the records of Church Gresley pottery T.G.Green & Co Ltd 1864 - 2007. Housing: Staff records, Potters sketches, Catalogues and Collections of sets of the rarest items of pottery once made in the village. You are welcome to save and share our images from this site, but please give credit or acknowledgement if you do. Admins of such groups found to do so will be banned from posting and messaging.

Once again this week, for all you Fragment Found people, we can look at some sherds dug from within the old pottery wall...
15/06/2024

Once again this week, for all you Fragment Found people, we can look at some sherds dug from within the old pottery walls here in Church Gresley.

1. The glazed Cornishware Jug sherd - not made by the traditional banding method when Cornishware was made here, but a blue band painted on as it was plates and saucers, but this jug, under the spout, bears the three letters 'BRE'. Breakfast ? But why not centrally placed ? Was there more lettering either side ?

2. The glazed white sherd clearly showing the word 'BREAKFAST' in green, but what could this have been ?

3. The unglazed 'Queen's Pudding Boiler' sherd. A real find this ! These patented Challis pudding boilers rarely come with the pottery manufacturer back stamps to the base, made in sizes 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20, they came with metal lids. Unknown until now, but T.G.Green & Co were also manufacturers of these boilers !

4. An unglazed white cup, with handwriting. Some numbers are clearly evident, '10 1/2'. Was this a test piece in the kiln ?

5. Easily recognisable, a glazed sherd with the post 1929 Green & Co backstamp, but this is a little unusual, an '0' over the stamp. Often seen over the Cornishware Shield and then on wartime items, to identify that the piece was for export only, but unusual over a 'Church' backstamp.

Sometimes the smallest of fragments raise so many questions, and can open new doors...

I'm really pleased to be able to announce the first of two awards given to the T.G.Green Museum Archive for 2024 🎉Awarde...
09/06/2024

I'm really pleased to be able to announce the first of two awards given to the T.G.Green Museum Archive for 2024 🎉

Awarded 'Best Heritage Museum 2024 - Derbyshire' for the online, digital content of my work archiving the pottery's history. Acquisition International judged the content and interaction with the public through Instagram, Facebook, Twitter/X and Gresleypottery website traffic.

One day, it would be nice to have a physical museum to display everything (how many years have I been saying that?), but in the meantime, the museum of 2024 is digitally based, and can still win awards ! 😊

https://www.acquisition-international.com/winners/t-g-green-pottery-museum-archive/

On this   we remember those who landed on the French shores on 6th June 1944.This rare & unique T.G.Green plate made dur...
06/06/2024

On this we remember those who landed on the French shores on 6th June 1944.

This rare & unique T.G.Green plate made during WWII, bears an image of the then Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Sir Winston Churchill, with the recognised phrase of ‘There’ll always be an England’ around.

Created by the aerograph technique, black ink was sprayed over a template which was then removed, and the plate glazed, with the T.G.Green back stamp of the time placed to the rear.

Here’s a super piece of local history just arrived back home 🤗An original ‘Marston’s Burton Ales’ Marston’s Brown Label ...
04/06/2024

Here’s a super piece of local history just arrived back home 🤗

An original ‘Marston’s Burton Ales’ Marston’s Brown Label Whisky ashtray 🚬

Dating to at least the 1920s, this fine T.G.Green ashtray would have graced many a Marston’s public house bar 🍻

Here is an unusual and rare commemorative mug made here in Church Gresley for a Workman’s Institute in Abertridwr, Wales...
18/05/2024

Here is an unusual and rare commemorative mug made here in Church Gresley for a Workman’s Institute in Abertridwr, Wales, just north of Caerphilly. It was originally built as workmen's institute and library in 1910.

For many years it was a community hub, holding concerts and musical events as a showcase for local talent in front of packed audiences. In 1938 part of the hall also became a cinema.

However, gradually over the following decades the facility deteriorated before it later became a bingo hall with the library turning into a boxing gym.

The building still stands today, with planning permission for 12 two-bedroom flats.

Opened in 1895, Windsor Colliery amalgamated with the Nantgarw Colliery in 1974, and finally closed in 1986. Ty'n y Parc (Cymraeg for "house on the park") now occupies the colliery site.

One other such mug is held by Amgueddfa Cymru / Museum Wales under acquisition number 88.2021/3

Here’s a bit of a Midweek Mystery… 🕵🏼‍♂️Dug from the old factory site, within the foundations of one of the bottle kilns...
15/05/2024

Here’s a bit of a Midweek Mystery… 🕵🏼‍♂️

Dug from the old factory site, within the foundations of one of the bottle kilns, came this fragment of what appears to be an ashtray 🚬

What was the cigarette or cigar brand c1920s that began with the letters ‘RE’ ? 🤔

Maybe it was the name of a beer, or a spirit, mineral water, or brewery 🤷🏻‍♂️

Any suggestions warmly welcomed 🤗

Back to 1975, with another from the bundle of A4 advertising leaflets from Elvin Decor of Middlesex. A store that sold m...
11/05/2024

Back to 1975, with another from the bundle of A4 advertising leaflets from Elvin Decor of Middlesex. A store that sold mostly Scandinavian furniture with a smattering of British homewares and lamps.

This one features the big T.G.Green sellers of that year: 'Cardinal', 'Elite', 'Epicure' and the next big lettered range after Cornishware, 'Spectrum'.

Interesting to note that the ribbed design of the white Elite range was simply available in green/white and brown/white rather than being named designs of their own.

#1975

Sometimes, there's a sleeper in auction houses... the white handled pourer I featured a few weeks back ? Meet the red ve...
01/05/2024

Sometimes, there's a sleeper in auction houses... the white handled pourer I featured a few weeks back ? Meet the red version !!! 🙌

In an odd, mixed auction Lot at Bishop & Miller Auctioneers last week, this Red Cornishware Pourer was hiding on the left of the lead photo 🔎👀

I'd neither registered for the auction nor was prepared to bid, as I only spotted it in an email that had popped up 8 minutes before the timed auction end ! I needed to register an account, have my payment card approved and log in, all done with only 2 minutes left. Bid placed, the auction ended and despite the auctioneers £40 estimate, got the Lot for... £25 😮

Thanks to Auctionet the box was delivered by FedEx with no breakages 👏

Original Cornish Red is a little unusual, unlike all the other colours produced in the late 1950s and the way that Cornishware do it today, the red is enamelled over the glaze. The kilns here in Church Gresley just couldn't give the correct red required, a colour rapidly growing in fashion after the war. The domestic potteries of Stoke-on-Trent had it down to a tee, here, the test reds were any shade from brown to purple, and all destroyed. In an aim to impress the shops and stores, Greens set about hand painting some of the war production white Cornishware as a tempter of things to come... it wasn't to be, the likes of Sadler and Kleen Kitchenware took the orders. The hand enamelled reds were set loose into society and now command the highest prices of Cornishware ❤️

A Welcome Home to this very rare piece 🤗

Paying homage today to one of the most influential pottery designers of the UK, who clearly influenced many patterns her...
27/04/2024

Paying homage today to one of the most influential pottery designers of the UK, who clearly influenced many patterns here at T.G.Green.

Historic England this week unveiled a blue plaque at the home of Clarice Cliff in Snow Hill, Shelton, Stoke-on-Trent.

Clarice, who was born in 1899 studied at the Burslem School of Arts, where T.G.Green's own Frederick Parker also studied at the same time.

Clarice went on to work at A.J.Wilkinson in Newport and created many well recognised designs alongside her 70 'Bizarre Girls' (though four were boys !).

There's never been any evidence that I could find that Clarice ever came to Church Gresley, though equidistant between Gresley and Stoke is the town of Uttoxeter. I've heard stories of many pottery workers cycling out through the countryside to Uttoxeter on a Sunday... who's not to say that those Bizarre Girls met with our Gresley decorators and passed on a few ideas ?

A picture of 1970s rustic kitchen charm !Part of a collection of original T.G.Green advertising material taken in today,...
24/04/2024

A picture of 1970s rustic kitchen charm !

Part of a collection of original T.G.Green advertising material taken in today, lots of adverts from 1975...

This really takes me back to the mid 1970s, a time of Elizabeth David, TV chefs and European kitchen styles of, well... brown.

A good smattering of Granville here, a bit of Cane and a host of country veg to set the tone. Retro to the hilt !

Bi ? Bye 👋 Buy !Here’s a newly discovered named Cornishware jar 😮Missed by many at auction, it looked like the common BI...
20/04/2024

Bi ? Bye 👋 Buy !

Here’s a newly discovered named Cornishware jar 😮

Missed by many at auction, it looked like the common BI.CARB.SODA this ‘CARB.SODA’ is so far unique in that it’s missing its ‘BI’. Also, a common find is the longer form ‘CARBONATE OF SODA’.

Quite why this CARB.SODA jar was lettered will remain a mystery... was it meant to be Bi.Carb or Carbonate ? Is there a difference between Bicarbonate and Carbonate of Soda ? I can’t find one... and neither can my school's science teacher.

This size 24s (4.25”/11cm) is the jar between the Spice Jar and the 18s (5”/12.5cm). 24s were specifically lettered jars and the early church back stamp dates it to 1923 to 1929, the taller neck shape puts it nearer 1923 than a later 1929.

Lovely to have met Jane of Betty & Flo Vintage Homewares yesterday... especially lovely as she was able to hand over thi...
14/04/2024

Lovely to have met Jane of Betty & Flo Vintage Homewares yesterday... especially lovely as she was able to hand over this Cornishware Cake/Sandwich plate on the Court shape from c1929 !

Keen eyed Jane had spotted it at the recent Newark Antiques Fair last week and knew it was something a little different !

I last held one of these down in Tasmania of all places, where one nestles in collector George's home and was one of my stop off points when I was in Australia/New Zealand meeting collectors in 2013/2014.

I love this shape, so Art Deco and used for the Eclipse, Felicia, Fruit, Physalis and Grassmere patterns. Very 'Odeon-esque' !

Easter starts here ! 🐣I can't believe that the special edition Happy Easter 2005 Egg Cups will be 20 years old next year...
29/03/2024

Easter starts here ! 🐣

I can't believe that the special edition Happy Easter 2005 Egg Cups will be 20 years old next year. It only seems like yesterday I was watching them being made across the road in the pottery 👀

Wishing Everyone A Very Happy Easter ! 🤗

If you've not come across this T.G.Green pattern before, let me introduce you to 'Chatsworth'Chatsworth was produced on ...
23/03/2024

If you've not come across this T.G.Green pattern before, let me introduce you to 'Chatsworth'

Chatsworth was produced on the 'Oblique' shape in a full table range for a very short period from 1929/1930

It is what is known as 'Over Enamelled' meaning that the pottery was initially glazed, with the back stamp under, and then hand painted in enamel over the glaze

The pattern more than nods towards the designs of Charles Rennie Macintosh

With Easter approaching, it's always a good time of year to revisit this T.G.Green Nursery Set - 'Happy Ark'.This week t...
16/03/2024

With Easter approaching, it's always a good time of year to revisit this T.G.Green Nursery Set - 'Happy Ark'.

This week the duck collection here has been added to with the Oval Baby Plate.

Introduced in September 1938 and advertised in the T.G.Green 1939 salesman's diary, this series was a very short-lived range due to wartime restrictions, so not a lot exist.

Along with the duck design were a bear, frog, swan, penguin and an as yet undiscovered kangaroo, all stencil decorated using the aerograph brush.

Serving Mothers for over 100 years... Happy Cornishware Mother's Day 💐Pic 1: c1953 / Pic 2: c1963                       ...
10/03/2024

Serving Mothers for over 100 years...
Happy Cornishware Mother's Day 💐

Pic 1: c1953 / Pic 2: c1963

Here's an unusual early 1930s table set by T.G.Green & Co Ltd.As yet unnamed as there is no recorded evidence of any adv...
03/03/2024

Here's an unusual early 1930s table set by T.G.Green & Co Ltd.

As yet unnamed as there is no recorded evidence of any advertising material, this simple hand decorated pattern in black and green is both effective and art deco in design.

Now recorded in the 'fruit' shaped Cruet Set (the pepper, mustard and salt are in the moulded shapes of a plum, an apple and a pear) and on a Court shaped Tureen with Plates and Soup bowl, this pattern keeps appearing.

Likely to be passed off in a thrift or charity shop, so little of this pattern is recorded that it makes it one of the rarer T.G.Green patterns of the 1930s.

Back to local history today... this is a really unusual commemorative plate made by T.G.Green for the Ashby De La Zouch ...
25/02/2024

Back to local history today... this is a really unusual commemorative plate made by T.G.Green for the Ashby De La Zouch Agricultural Society.

The plate, on the 'Patio' shape (later used on the Safari, Gingham, Flaire, Burgundy Cherry, Devon Peach patterns) uses 22kt gold on a cobalt blue ground. The centre displaying the late Queen Elizabeth II Coronation Coat of Arms & Cypher and shows it was a Special Coronation Award for the 40th Annual Show in 1953.

Started in 1904 the Ashby Agricultural continues today as the 'Ashby Show' with this year's show on Sunday July 14th. The show has only ever stopped for both World Wars.

Having two back stamps of the pottery to the base, there is also an indistinguishable name. A rare piece indeed !

Some 25 years ago, the Cornish Collectors Club ran a small editorial entitled 'Here comes Felix!!' in the Cornish Pixie ...
21/02/2024

Some 25 years ago, the Cornish Collectors Club ran a small editorial entitled 'Here comes Felix!!' in the Cornish Pixie magazine. It featured 2 plates owned by a collector bearing cartoon images of an early Felix the Cat character 'Won't you walk with Felix' and 'Please Felix don't shoot'.

It wasn't until after the demise of the Collectors Club in 2000 that I discovered the original T.G.Green catalogues and in the 1923 copy, Felix the Cat was featured on the Tea Ware page with a Cup & Saucer displayed on the Worcester shape.

It's taken some 20 years for another piece to come to light and now the T.G.Green & Co Ltd Pottery - Church Gresley Archives have a 2nd different plate 'Felix takes a walk' which joins 'Now Felix keep on Walking' making 4 known of in total.

Rediscovered by Diane Jones in Cromer, Norfolk the plate belonged to her Great Grandmother Mary Ann Neave, thanks for letting me now look after it 🖤🤍❤️🖤🤍

How well do you know the Cornishware mugs on your shelves ? 🤔Have a closer look... between 2001-2004, Church Gresley pot...
10/02/2024

How well do you know the Cornishware mugs on your shelves ? 🤔

Have a closer look... between 2001-2004, Church Gresley pottery worker Sandra Foster started to impress the 'Church' mark from a back stamping hand tool and impressed a few handles on the Cornishware mugs ! 😲

Sandra can't remember how many she did (it wasn't many), but they passed QC and went out to the public 😮

Have you got one that you may have never spotted ? 👀

The Instagram page is somewhat filled with birthday celebrations today: https://www.instagram.com/p/C24VWs5NZgu/?img_ind...
03/02/2024

The Instagram page is somewhat filled with birthday celebrations today: https://www.instagram.com/p/C24VWs5NZgu/?img_index=1

Keeping it all classic T.G.Green and Cornishware here in Facebook, here's another of those White Cornishware pieces from the '10 Plain Years' 😮

Found in a garden centre/antiques cabin, for just £10 ! The bargains are still out there... now to find the SUGAR and TEA 🤓

Now where do I start ? 😳Maybe not the best of colours for T.G.Green to ever trial for original Cornish Kitchen Ware.A bi...
26/01/2024

Now where do I start ? 😳

Maybe not the best of colours for T.G.Green to ever trial for original Cornish Kitchen Ware.

A bit of detective work identifies this piece as likely having been created between 1935-1942 and 1952-1957.

The shape doesn’t appear prior to 1935, it’s not part of the original range, and it’s been bottle kiln fired rather than gas/electric kiln fired, the last bottle kiln firing here in Church Gresley was in 1957, though retailed Cornishware itself wasn’t bottle kiln fired after 1952.

Next, the colour… well, it’s certainly brown ! I was hoping that this would be a simple task to identify the colour used, but no… Green’s colour book of the mid 20th century shows:

Brown No 2
Brown No 6
Brown No 7
Brown No 26
Brown No 500
Brown No 550
Brown No 802

There is also a ‘Brown U G’ (likely Under Glaze). The interesting thing about this particular shade of brown was made from an Arsenic base !!! (Please don’t lick Brown Cornishware !)

All of these ‘recipes’ were made through different processes to eventually create a ground powder that would be added to wet slip to be used to colour Cornishware.

The base here has the letters and numbers 544 and 38 BR. Later test firing pieces had the number etched into the base, pointing to the fact that this is likely an early piece. I would suggest that the ‘38 BR’ identifies the colour as Brown No 38, a shade not listed in the colour book.

Whichever brown it is… it wasn’t the most eye catching of colours, so never likely put into production 💩

Cornishware

A pair of mugs have been loaned to me in an attempt to find out more about them.John and Gale from Burton HOPE found the...
20/01/2024

A pair of mugs have been loaned to me in an attempt to find out more about them.

John and Gale from Burton HOPE found these mugs in a box of donated items to their charity that helps homeless people in the Burton-on-Trent area.

They've been shown to The Magic Attic and Sharpe's Pottery Museum in Swadlincote, who could provide no help.

Decorated by T.G.Green & Co Ltd in 1939 the front of the mugs suggest that these were made for S.D.U.D.C (Swadlincote District Urban District Council) now South Derbyshire District Council in 1939 to welcome evacuees at the beginning of World War II from Birmingham.

Were these mugs given to evacuees from Birmingham ? Were they made for officials of S.D.U.D.C and Birmingham City Council ?

John, Gale and I would love to shed more light on them, as I've certainly not seen them before !

90 years ago in January 1934 there's no doubt that the pottery was in full production of it's latest new design... 'Blue...
13/01/2024

90 years ago in January 1934 there's no doubt that the pottery was in full production of it's latest new design... 'Blue Domino Ware'.

Released in April 1934 the range proved the second-longest pattern next to Cornishware to be produced here in Church Gresley.

Prior to the design being mechanised in 2004, whereby the spots were 'drilled' out of the blue slip, the original method was for ladies to have a small white disc on each of their fingers and thumb on one hand and holding the biscuit ware item in one hand quickly dabbed the discs over the piece, before it was sprayed with blue and then dried. Very skilfully the discs were then removed, with a pin, and the piece glazed... time-consuming to say the least ! Occasionally you'll spot a tiny pin prick where the disc was removed.

Local lady Janet Watkins remembers the process well as she spent many years applying the white discs, now well into her 80s she still remembers it was' the best job of her life'.

Marketed as 'Double Five' in recognition of the number of spots applied by each hand and the trademark number 546917.

From Frederick Parkers 1924 sketches, one-page shows his designs for the shape of a 'Cube Set'.The Cube Teapot Company w...
07/01/2024

From Frederick Parkers 1924 sketches, one-page shows his designs for the shape of a 'Cube Set'.

The Cube Teapot Company was set up by Robert Crawford Johnson (1882–1937), who was responsible for the design and registered "Cube Teapots Ltd" in 1917 and based in Campbells Yard to the rear of Leicester Railway Station.

The company never made any pottery, licences to produce the Cube range went to several Staffordshire potteries, T.G.Green & Co Ltd were the only potters outside Stoke-on-Trent to produce the wares.

Just 'flown' in from the USA are these fantastic examples of a huge 2 pint teapot with milk jug, decorated in what is considered to be the 'Seagull' pattern given to staff at Greens that married in the 1920s & 30s, numbered C121.

Given the pottery's proximity to Leicester and Fredericks 1924 sketches, it would be interesting to find out if there was a closer correlation between the two than that of the Staffordshire potteries.

Now we are in 2024 we can look back at a dated archival item, that of Frederick Parker's 'Suggestions for Pottery Design...
01/01/2024

Now we are in 2024 we can look back at a dated archival item, that of Frederick Parker's 'Suggestions for Pottery Designs' from January 1924

100 years ago this month, Frederick, who had just finished his expansion of the E-Blue Jugs into what we now know as Cornishware, set about designing different decorative motifs and this post looks at some of his patterns for Cups & Saucers.

Not just a Manager here at T.G.Green, but also an engineer and talented artist !

More to come from his fantastic sketchbooks over the coming weeks...

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