The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience Visitor centre and outdoor monuments commemorating the Battle of Bannockburn. Cared for by National Trust for Scotland. #Bannockburn1314

Operating as usual

We were delighted to welcome young people from Bannockburn High School to our site today🎉🥳! They are the first school gr...
23/08/2021

We were delighted to welcome young people from Bannockburn High School to our site today🎉🥳! They are the first school group to have visited us since early 2020.

We still have school booking slots available for 2021/22, if you're interested get in touch with us on [email protected]

We were delighted to welcome young people from Bannockburn High School to our site today🎉🥳! They are the first school group to have visited us since early 2020.

We still have school booking slots available for 2021/22, if you're interested get in touch with us on [email protected]

On this day in 1305 Sir William Wallace was publicly executed at Smithfield in London. He suffered a particularly cruel ...
23/08/2021

On this day in 1305 Sir William Wallace was publicly executed at Smithfield in London. He suffered a particularly cruel and brutal form of punishment, one which was intended to mark definitive end to Scottish resistance to English ambitions in Scotland.

Wallace had emerged from relative obscurity in 1297 as one of the key leaders of unrest directed against the recently imposed English administration in southern Scotland. In the autumn of that year, he joined forces with Andrew Murray (one of the ringleaders of the rebels in northern Scotland) and inflicted an unexpected defeat on the English at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. Wallace and Murray were appointed joint guardians of the realm in the aftermath of the battle, although Murray soon died and left Wallace as the de facto head of the Scottish government. The following summer Wallace was defeated at the Battle of Falkirk and resigned – or was forced to resign – the guardianship, but he remained active in resisting the English. He travelled to France (and perhaps further afield) to represent the interests of the Scots abroad and continued to participate in military actions on his return to Scotland.

However, by 1304, it was becoming increasingly difficult for the Scots to maintain effective resistance. In an effort to bring the war to a definitive conclusion, King Edward I of England offered a general amnesty to the Scottish political community, but Wallace was explicitly excluded from this. The best Wallace could hope for was to ‘render himself up to the will and mercy of our sovereign lord the king, if it shall seem good to him’. The exact circumstances of his eventual arrest are difficult to discern, not least because they have been subject of frenzied embellishment by later writers. The tradition that had emerged by the early fifteenth-century was that he had been betrayed by John Menteith and delivered into the hands of his enemies. In fact, Menteith merely seems to have had the misfortune of being sheriff of Dumbarton, in whose jurisdiction Wallace happened to be lifted. Once Wallace was in custody, Menteith was faced with the choice of either sending him southwards or else being condemned as an outlaw alongside him. None of Menteith’s contemporaries seem to have blamed him for Wallace’s fate, and he would serve as a close councillor of King Robert I from about 1309. Menteith probably even fought for the Scots here at Bannockburn in 1314.

Having been escorted from Dumbarton to London by Sir John Seagrave, on the morning of 23rd August Wallace was publicly processed from the house of William Leyre, one of the aldermen of the city, to Westminster Palace. Here, in the great hall, he was made to stand on a scaffold and crowned with laurel leaves, supposedly because he had previously boasted that he would one day ‘wear a crown in that same hall’. Sir Peter Mallory, one of the king’s justices, charged him with treason against King Edward, resisting the king’s authority and killing the king’s officers (including William Heselrig, the English sheriff of Lanark who Wallace had killed in early 1297), sworn fealty to the king of France, attacked northern England, ‘feloniously and seditiously assaulted, burned and devastated religious men and nuns...[and] inflicted [upon] all, old and young, wives and widows, children and babes the worst death which he could devise’, and ‘harmoniously and eagerly...refused to submit himself to the lord king's peace’. According to the contemporary Annals of London, Wallace insisted he had never been a traitor to the English king – whose authority he had never formally recognised – although he did not apparently dispute the remaining charges. He was then summarily condemned to the punishment reserved for traitors – hanging, drawing and quartering.

Wallace was stripped naked and tied to a hurdle, which was then dragged through the streets of London to Smithfield. Here, Wallace was hanged by the neck ‘for the robberies, homicides and felonies which he carried out in the kingdom of England and the land of Scotland’. This distinction between the *kingdom* of England and the *land* of Scotland is particularly illustrative of the attitude of the English authorities towards Scotland in this period. Before he could suffocate, Wallace was taken down, castrated and disembowelled ‘for the dreadful wickedness which he did to the church’, and then his ‘heart, liver and lungs and all the bowels...from which such perverse thoughts proceeded’ were burned in a bonfire. It is unclear at what point in this grisly process Wallace would have died. His body was then beheaded – the standard punishment for outlaws – and the rest was divided into four parts. The head was dipped in tar and displayed from London Bridge, where it remained (presumably in pretty poor condition) over a year later, when in September 1306 it was joined by that of his former associate Sir Simon Fraser (who had been executed in a similar manner for supporting Bruce). The four ‘quarters’ were taken north by the same Sir John Seagrave who had brought Wallace from Dumbarton and were displayed at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, Berwick-upon-Tweed, Stirling and Perth ‘to put dread in and to warn all by-passers and observers’.

The brutality and gruesomeness of Wallace’s ex*****on surely reflects how, to the English crown at least, Wallace had come to symbolise organised resistance to their ambitions in Scotland. Yet it does not seem to have much impact on events in Scotland. Reconciliation seems to have been the order of the day, with the English authorities realising that they would need the cooperation of the more influential figures within the community of the realm for any new political settlement to stick. In September 1305 an ‘ordinance for the government of Scotland’ was drawn up, outlining plans for the kingdom to be governed by a council of English *and* Scottish lords, ultimately answerable to (though not directed by) the King of England. One person somewhat excluded by this development was Robert Bruce, earl of Carrick (later King Robert I). It is possible that Bruce’s shifting allegiances in the years 1296-1305 had made him seem like an untrustworthy maverick in the eyes of the English crown. But equally his diminished influence in the new administration may have reflected a recognition that the extensive political networks of his rivals the Comyns were more useful to the new government than Bruce’s own. Either way, a sense of alienation from the incoming regime – coupled with a recognition that the chances of a revival of the Balliol claim were now vanishingly small – no doubt influenced Bruce’s decision to make a dramatic bid for power in early 1306.

We can never be certain of how Wallace would have reacted to Bruce’s assumption of the kingship in 1306. His brother John was executed in 1307 for supporting Bruce, yet this may simply reflect the fact that after 1304 the Wallaces were such pariahs in English eyes that they had no choice but to support whoever stood against them. For his part, Bruce does not seem to have felt any resentment towards those involved in Wallace’s death. As noted above, he treated John Menteith as a trusted councillor, and when Sir John Seagrave was captured here at Bannockburn in 1314, he allowed him to be ransomed rather than exacting any kind of vengeance for his part in distributing Wallace’s remains. Early Scottish chroniclers however would prove eager to draw connections between Wallace and Bruce, presenting King Robert as taking over the struggle that Wallace had begun. For example, John Fordun (writing in the 1380s) takes this line. Walter Bower, writing in the 1440s, recounts an almost certainly fictitious meeting between Wallace and Bruce immediately after the Battle of Falkirk in 1298, at which Wallace provides the direct inspiration for Bruce to take up arms against the English. Writing in the 1470s, the poet Blind Hary goes so far as to claim that Wallace always wanted Bruce to be king and fought the English only to provide an example to him. In reality, Wallace – like many in the Scottish political community – would likely have only have made his mind up about Bruce once he had seen the king’s performance in the early years of the reign. Of course, the events of August 1305 ensured that Wallace never had the chance to do so.

⛰🥾Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond!🥾⛰During the month of September the team at Bannockburn will be lacing up their walking bo...
22/08/2021
Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond

⛰🥾Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond!🥾⛰

During the month of September the team at Bannockburn will be lacing up their walking boots to raise funds for Learning and Events at the visitor centre. The pandemic has affected us greatly and we are in need of funds to repair and restore our invaluable armour and weapons collection 🗡🛡, replenish our archery equipment 🏹, continue to run our craft workshops 🎨 and reintroduce our lecture series 🗣.

Please follow the link to donate and for more information. Everything we do at The Battle of Bannockburn and The National Trust for Scotland relies on the support of our visitors, members and donors. We value your continued loyalty and could not do what we do without you, and for that we offer our sincere thanks! ❤️

https://www.justgiving.com/campaign/bannockburnbagsbenlomond

The National Trust for Scotlands team at Bannockburn are setting off in September to climb to the summit of Ben Lomond to fundraise for the Bannockburn Learning Resources and Events, a facility used by both the public and the school groups.

🖊 It's #PoetsDay today! 🖊 Why not celebrate by visiting our temporary exhibition 'Generation Change: Young People's Part...
21/08/2021

🖊 It's #PoetsDay today! 🖊

Why not celebrate by visiting our temporary exhibition 'Generation Change: Young People's Participation in Protest', which contains poetry by young people in Scotland? Themes include race, the environment and society. 👥

'Generation Change' is open daily in the visitor centre and is free and unticketed.

#LivingMuseums

Timeline Photos
20/08/2021

Timeline Photos

New latest news:

‘Trailblazing’ young people in our Stirling #LivingMuseums project group celebrated the opening of their exhibition on the theme of protest earlier this week.

Click here to read more:
https://buff.ly/2UzfuRT

Photos from FVRCC's post
20/08/2021

Photos from FVRCC's post

We were thrilled to see Kathleen Jamie announced as Scotland's new Makar! 🎉The position of Scots Makar was created in 20...
20/08/2021

We were thrilled to see Kathleen Jamie announced as Scotland's new Makar! 🎉

The position of Scots Makar was created in 2004 by the Scottish Parliament and the holder is Scotland's national poet. Kathleen Jamie is the fourth poet to hold the title - Edwin Morgan, Liz Lochhead and Jackie Kay have also been Scots Makar. 📚

Kathleen Jamie carved the poem on the wooden beam which stands atop our Rotunda - come and visit us to see the work of Scotland's new Makar! 📜

We were thrilled to see Kathleen Jamie announced as Scotland's new Makar! 🎉

The position of Scots Makar was created in 2004 by the Scottish Parliament and the holder is Scotland's national poet. Kathleen Jamie is the fourth poet to hold the title - Edwin Morgan, Liz Lochhead and Jackie Kay have also been Scots Makar. 📚

Kathleen Jamie carved the poem on the wooden beam which stands atop our Rotunda - come and visit us to see the work of Scotland's new Makar! 📜

We are very excited to launch our fundraising campaign: Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond!🥾⛰During the month of September the ...
19/08/2021
Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond

We are very excited to launch our fundraising campaign: Bannockburn Bags Ben Lomond!🥾⛰

During the month of September the team at Bannockburn will be lacing up their walking boots to raise funds for Learning Resources and Events at the visitor centre. The pandemic has affected us greatly and we are in need of funds to repair and restore our invaluable armour and weapons collection 🗡🛡, replenish our archery equipment 🏹, continue to run our craft workshops 🎨 and reintroduce our lecture series 🗣.

Please follow the link to donate and for more information. Everything we do at The Battle of Bannockburn and The National Trust for Scotland relies on the support of our visitors, members and donors. We value your continued loyalty and could not do what we do without you, and for that we offer our sincere thanks! ❤️

https://www.justgiving.com/campaign/bannockburnbagsbenlomond

The National Trust for Scotlands team at Bannockburn are setting off in September to climb to the summit of Ben Lomond to fundraise for the Bannockburn Learning Resources and Events, a facility used by both the public and the school groups.

So many congratulations to the group of young people who took part in our Children in Scotland #LivingMuseums project - ...
18/08/2021

So many congratulations to the group of young people who took part in our Children in Scotland #LivingMuseums project - their final creative output is now in place and open to the public! 🎉

‘Generation Change: Young People’s Participation in Protest’ is an exhibition comprising of signs, photos, video and text from young people in Scotland who took part in protests in 2020 and 2021. 🪧 Just as the Battle of Bannockburn changed the course of history in Scotland, the young people wanted to give voice to the recent events that have changed the course of history for the whole world. 🌍

‘Generation Change’ is open daily 10am-5pm in the visitor centre. It will run from today (Wednesday 18th August) until Tuesday 31st August. It is free and unticketed.

So many congratulations to the group of young people who took part in our Children in Scotland #LivingMuseums project - their final creative output is now in place and open to the public! 🎉

‘Generation Change: Young People’s Participation in Protest’ is an exhibition comprising of signs, photos, video and text from young people in Scotland who took part in protests in 2020 and 2021. 🪧 Just as the Battle of Bannockburn changed the course of history in Scotland, the young people wanted to give voice to the recent events that have changed the course of history for the whole world. 🌍

‘Generation Change’ is open daily 10am-5pm in the visitor centre. It will run from today (Wednesday 18th August) until Tuesday 31st August. It is free and unticketed.

Photos from Toonspeak Young People's Theatre's post
18/08/2021

Photos from Toonspeak Young People's Theatre's post

Join us over on our Instagram story today for a sneak peek at our upcoming exhibition ‘Generation Change’! 👀From tomorro...
17/08/2021

Join us over on our Instagram story today for a sneak peek at our upcoming exhibition ‘Generation Change’! 👀

From tomorrow, our temporary exhibition on young people’s participation in protest will be open in the visitor centre. 🪧Join us today as the young people who have taken part in our Children in Scotland #LivingMuseums project build the exhibition…

…and launch it with an exclusive event this evening! ✨

Join us over on our Instagram story today for a sneak peek at our upcoming exhibition ‘Generation Change’! 👀

From tomorrow, our temporary exhibition on young people’s participation in protest will be open in the visitor centre. 🪧Join us today as the young people who have taken part in our Children in Scotland #LivingMuseums project build the exhibition…

…and launch it with an exclusive event this evening! ✨

It's just two days to go until our temporary exhibition 'Generation Change: Young People's Participation in Protest'. 🙌T...
16/08/2021

It's just two days to go until our temporary exhibition 'Generation Change: Young People's Participation in Protest'. 🙌

The exhibition marks the completion of our #LivingMuseums project which has aimed to give young people more of a voice within heritage. The exhibition comprises of protest artworks, photos and videos from young people in Scotland. ✊

It will run 18th-31st August and is free.

It's just two days to go until our temporary exhibition 'Generation Change: Young People's Participation in Protest'. 🙌

The exhibition marks the completion of our #LivingMuseums project which has aimed to give young people more of a voice within heritage. The exhibition comprises of protest artworks, photos and videos from young people in Scotland. ✊

It will run 18th-31st August and is free.

We are very pleased to announce that our new outdoor tours are now running at 11am and 3pm every Saturday and Sunday! 🥳T...
14/08/2021

We are very pleased to announce that our new outdoor tours are now running at 11am and 3pm every Saturday and Sunday! 🥳

The outdoor tour complements our indoor Experience by offering the 'grunt's-eye-view' of the Battle of Bannockburn. Stand on the very ground where Bruce's front line faced Edward's army on the first day and imagine what it would have been like to be there yourself! ⚔️

Book your place online here: https://bit.ly/3AAN1dF

We are very pleased to announce that our new outdoor tours are now running at 11am and 3pm every Saturday and Sunday! 🥳

The outdoor tour complements our indoor Experience by offering the 'grunt's-eye-view' of the Battle of Bannockburn. Stand on the very ground where Bruce's front line faced Edward's army on the first day and imagine what it would have been like to be there yourself! ⚔️

Book your place online here: https://bit.ly/3AAN1dF

Address

Glasgow Road, Whins Of Milton
Stirling
FK7 0LJ

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when The Battle of Bannockburn Experience posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to The Battle of Bannockburn Experience:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other History Museums in Stirling

Show All