The British Golf Museum - St Andrews

The British Golf Museum - St Andrews Adults - £10 Concessions - £6 Children - Free Group rates available on request
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The 5 star British Golf Museum sits at the heart of the home of golf, just 67 yards from the famous Old Course. Imaginative exhibitions, hands on activities and stunning multimedia displays bring to life over 500 years of golfing history. The British Golf Museum is the world’s premier heritage centre for golf.

#Mondayblog from Lauren:From this week I am going to be introducing some of the inspirational female golfers I have been...
27/07/2020

#Mondayblog from Lauren:

From this week I am going to be introducing some of the inspirational female golfers I have been learning about during my research of women’s golf in Scotland.

Starting off this series of blogs with Scotland’s Jessie Valentine. Jessie Valentine (1915-2006), daughter of a professional golfer, was given her first club at the age of 5, gradually adding to her collection over the years until she had a full set aged 17. She won the British Ladies Amateur Open Championship in 1937, 1955 and 1958. As a result of having a remarkable 21 year gap between her first and last Amateur Open Championship title, she was awarded a place in the Guinness Book of Golf.

From her first Amateur Open Championship win in 1937, she went on to win the Scottish Championship in 1938, 1939, 1951, 1955 and 1956 and won the New Zealand Championship whilst touring New Zealand and Australia with the LGU team, in 1935. She played in several international championships including the Curtis cup against America in 1936, 1938, 1950, 1952, 1954, 1956 and 1958, the Vagliano Cup against France in 1935, 1936 1939,1947, 1949, 1951 and 1955, and against Belgium in 1949, 1951 , 1954 and 1955.

She also played in Home Internationals 1934-1939, 1947 and 1949-1958. In 1959, she became the first woman to receive an MBE for golf. She was later awarded the Frank Moran Trophy in 1967 for being ‘the Scot who has done most for the game of golf’.

These golfers from Clacton-on-Sea, Essex appear to to be doing a bit of #timetravel with their golfing dress.The women w...
24/07/2020

These golfers from Clacton-on-Sea, Essex appear to to be doing a bit of #timetravel with their golfing dress.

The women were taking part in an "Olde English Fayre" in 1932, somehow the men remained in their plus fours!

#fashionfriday #exploreyourarchives

Imagine visiting the Highlands, to be met with a "Miserable Ghillie" This sketch from Thomas Hodge, was finished during ...
23/07/2020

Imagine visiting the Highlands, to be met with a "Miserable Ghillie"

This sketch from Thomas Hodge, was finished during his travels around Scotland and depicts Willie Henderson, who is rowing him across a Loch.

Not sure why Willie was so miserable ☹️

#ExploreYourArchive #Waystotravel

Well, you may not be able to go on your exotic holidays just yet. Instead, look back in time exploring our archives. 🧐In...
21/07/2020

Well, you may not be able to go on your exotic holidays just yet. Instead, look back in time exploring our archives. 🧐

In this album, the golfer, Norman Newton records his time at the Havana Country Club. Newton won the Cuban Championship in the 1920s. 📸

Who knows, he might have acquired a Cuban style to his walk before wearing these golf shoes at The Open in 1930 and 1933? 😎

20/07/2020
The R&A

We will be watching...

To celebrate The Open for the Ages and the long connected history of The Open and the Old Course, Iona Stephen takes us on a journey back in time to discover the first Champion Golfers when The Open came to St Andrews ⛳️

Watch the full video on our Youtube Channel tonight! (5PM UK)

Lauren's Monday blog:As part of my research on women’s golf, I have been looking at the distinctions between amateur and...
20/07/2020

Lauren's Monday blog:

As part of my research on women’s golf, I have been looking at the distinctions between amateur and professional status for both men and women, focusing on the problems women faced during the interwar and post Second World War period in particular, when more women began making the difficult decision between playing in amateur championships and earning a living through golf.

Prior to undertaking this research, I was unaware of the class distinction which existed between amateur and professional golf. According to the 1913 R&A Rules of Golf Committee, ‘an amateur is one who, after attaining the age of sixteen years, has never carried clubs for hire [thus excluding the more mature caddy]; has never received any consideration, directly or indirectly, for playing or for teaching the game; and has never played for a money prize in any competition.’ Whereas, ‘the term “professional golfer” is usually applied to players who receive payment for teaching or playing the game’.

There were very few British women professionals during the nineteenth and early twentieth century. The few that were classed as professional, normally worked in shops owned by their fathers or husbands and provided lessons to lady amateurs. The first female caddie was present in the 1913 Ladies Amateur Championship and in 1929, the first Female Assistant Professional, Meg Farquhar, was appointed at Lossiemouth. Although there was no professional tournament for women in Britain until 1976, women who wished to work in golf shops, had to forfeit their amateur status, and turn professional. This meant that they were no longer able to compete in the Ladies Amateur Open unless they received an invitation to do so.

British Amateur Champions Wanda Morgan and Enid Wilson both forfeited their amateur status during the 1930s, Morgan however had her status reinstated post WW2, along with Scotland’s Jean Donald, who turned professional later. Jean Donald turned professional again during the 1950s and this has been argued by Rosalynde Cossey, in her book Golfing Ladies, to have been ‘a severe blow to Scotland.’ This highlights that not only did the distinction between amateur and professional ensure that only those with the financial means could compete in amateur competitions, but it also threatened the future of competitive golf in Britain. As many talented golfers who could not afford the expense involved, often turned professional and were unable to compete in amateur competitions. As there were no professional championships for women until 1976, this put British Women’s golf at a disadvantage. From 1935, Amateur Champion Joyce Wethered began competing in America, where she was offered money to compete as she could no longer afford to play golf in Britain, without an income to support the expenses involved.

Not only were professional women golfers able to compete for the first time in 1976, with the establishment of the British Ladies Open Championship, open to both professionals and amateurs but 1976 also marked a turning point for professional women golfers, with the formation of the Women’s Professional Golfer’s Association. The organisation was established by British professional, Vivien Saunders and continues to represent the interests of women golfers worldwide, today.

What a view! This incredible painting from Graeme Baxter gives a sense of what the vista is like during The Open from th...
19/07/2020

What a view!

This incredible painting from Graeme Baxter gives a sense of what the vista is like during The Open from the balcony of The Royal and Ancient Clubhouse.

We're excited to watch the action unfold today in #TheOpenfortheAges - who do you think is going to win?

#golfingart #theopen

Fashion at The Open...We have witnessed iconic moments during the Championship's history and when we think of a player, ...
17/07/2020

Fashion at The Open...

We have witnessed iconic moments during the Championship's history and when we think of a player, not only do their performances stick in our mind but also what they were wearing.

We've written about Gary Player's black and white trousers before - but perhaps now more than ever they have a resonance. He wore them first during 1960 TheOpen as a statement against apartheid in South Africa and again in 2000. There is also his black cap which he wore.

Nick Faldo winning in 1992 wearing this famous Pringle designed shirt. It was his fifth major title in six years and he joined the likes of Jones, Cotton, Player, Nicklaus and Ballesteros as a three-time Champion Golfer in the 20th century.

The Claret Jug trousers were designed as part of a BBC Sports Academy for Ian Poulter to wear at the 2005 Open at St Andrews. Poulter was known for his fashion forward trouser style at this point in his career and created his own brand IJP Designs in 2007.

Tiger Woods winning in 2000 at St Andrews, we see a shift in the Championship from this moment, his legendary status was secured with a win at the Home of Golf.

His partnership with Nike brought in new styles and fabrics, his polo shirt in his favoured red shade for the final round.

There are so many iconic fashion moments of The Open, please share your favourite memories with us.

#FridayFashion #theopen #sportingheritage #golffashion #golfmemories

Time for a little quiz:Which Amateur players have won The Open?These three men are the only ones to have lifted the Clar...
16/07/2020

Time for a little quiz:

Which Amateur players have won The Open?

These three men are the only ones to have lifted the Claret Jug as an amateur player.

Can you name them, the year(s) and venue they did it?

#theopen

Excited to watch The Open For The Ages  🏆Almost 5 years to the day, our Curator revisits the spot on The Old Course wher...
15/07/2020

Excited to watch The Open For The Ages 🏆
Almost 5 years to the day, our Curator revisits the spot on The Old Course where she high-fived 2015 Open Champion, Zach Johnson.

What are your favourite memories of attending The Open? ⛳️

(Share your photos and memories in the comments below.) 🙌

From Old Tom Morris' 1864 Open Driving Putter to Jordan Spieth's 2017 Open Hybrid, take a look at clubs used by top play...
14/07/2020

From Old Tom Morris' 1864 Open Driving Putter to Jordan Spieth's 2017 Open Hybrid, take a look at clubs used by top players throughout the history of The Open 🧐

#Mondayblog from Lauren...As I mentioned last week, I have been working on a large piece of writing which explores the d...
13/07/2020

#Mondayblog from Lauren...

As I mentioned last week, I have been working on a large piece of writing which explores the development of the women’s game, within the wider context of golf in Scotland. As a result, I've been developing my knowledge of golf history in general.

Following on from last week’s post which discussed the development of the Women’s Amateur, this week I will explore the development of the oldest major, The Open which would have been played this week, for the 149th time.

Unfortunately, due to the Covid Pandemic, this year’s Championship is unable to go ahead, however we are looking forward to a week of virtual events to mark the occasion.

The Open, had its origins in the Prestwick Golf Club. In 1857, a letter was sent by Prestwick Golf Club to St Andrews, Perth, Musselburgh, Blackheath, Prestwick, Carnoustie, North Berwick and Leven clubs, inviting them to participate in the first official amateur championship.

The first competition was played in foursomes and the Royal Blackheath defeated The Royal and Ancient St Andrews in the final round.

The following year, the Championship was played by individuals, instead of foursomes, with Robert Chalmers from the Bruntsfield Club in Edinburgh as the competitions first individual champion.

The success of the amateur championships encouraged the Prestwick Golf Club to initiate a championship for professionals. A meeting was held on the 17th October 1860 at Prestwick Links, where eight players competed three rounds of twelve holes for the Challenge Belt.

This meeting became the first Open Championship. From 1861, the Championship became ‘open to all’, not only professionals.
Willie Park from Musselburgh won the first and fourth Open and Old Tom Morris, who at the time was a professional at Prestwick Golf Club, won the second, third, fifth and eighth championships.

The rivalry that developed between Park, representing the East of Scotland and Morris, representing the West, has been argued to have been the main reason for the success of the Open in its early years.

#theopen #golfhistory #sportingheritage

For #GolfingArt Sunday, we are sharing something a little different - a Mauchline ware cigar box from c1880.  The style ...
12/07/2020

For #GolfingArt Sunday, we are sharing something a little different - a Mauchline ware cigar box from c1880. The style of design originated from the Ayrshire town of Mauchline. Scottish scenes were most popular to tourists, this golfing scene is a beauty!

The Links of St Andrews appear to be very busy...

#golf #sportingart

Probably one of the most iconic pieces of golfing dress, the knickerbocker trouser or plus four/two were worn by men for...
10/07/2020

Probably one of the most iconic pieces of golfing dress, the knickerbocker trouser or plus four/two were worn by men for outdoor pursuits from as early as the 1860s but really came into vogue during the 1920s and 30s.

Freddie Tait, Champion Amateur golfer favoured the shorter trouser, as seen here in his portrait of 1901, which was unveiled after his death. The knickerbocker allowed the wearer to have freedom at the ankle and so was perfect for traversing the countryside.

Six time Open Champion Harry Vardon famously wore this style and there were debates in Golf Illustrated at the time on whether they were an acceptable look for professionals.

“Before the advent of Harry Vardon “the trouser” was de rigueur for professionals, and when Vardon, with the privileges of genius, first ventured to appear in knickerbockers, he created something of a sensation. His example has been largely followed by other professionals, and he himself has never wavered in his allegiance to the shorter garment. Amongst the leading professionals, however, the trouser maintains its supremacy, and there are many of the cracks who have never been seen in knickerbockers.”

It goes on to give a list of the professionals who wear trousers vs those that don the knickerbocker, with Champions such at Willie Park, Alexander Herd, J.H. Taylor and James Braid all preferring the trouser, they surmise...

“From this it would appear that the trouser has the greatest virtue as a professional champion hip garment.” - Golf Illustrated 13 October 1911

By the 1920s we see the adoption of the baggier version of the knickerbocker becoming popular. These were known as "plus fours" as they had 4 extra inches of fabric added at the knee. Plus two had 2 inches added. They were worn with socks - often highly patterned.

#FashionFriday #sportingheritage #golffashion #golf

09/07/2020
Golf Fishing Rod (1937)

Fishing and golf just for fun!

Location unknown. A girl sitting on bank of a small stream fishing. Close up of her fishing rod - it is a golf mashie converted into fishing rod. Several mor...

Golf and fishing have more in common than you might think. Fishing, along with golf, was one of the first leisure activi...
09/07/2020

Golf and fishing have more in common than you might think. Fishing, along with golf, was one of the first leisure activities available as lockdown restrictions eased, but did you know there is more to their shared history?

The Hardy Brothers of Alnwick, of fishing rod fame, started manufacturing steel-centred golf club shafts from Indian bamboo, from the 1890s. The price of hickory rose in 1917 so the use of bamboo cane made manufacture easier and the shafts more aesthetic. By the 1920s other fishing rod manufacturers began to produce bamboo shafts for golf clubs.

Once The R&A made steel shafts legal in 1929, however, the popularity for bamboo shafts declined. In 1935, the Hardy brothers ceased bamboo shaft production and turned to steel.

Our walk takes us along North Street today to see the birthplace of Jock Hutchison. Although born in St Andrews, Hutchis...
08/07/2020

Our walk takes us along North Street today to see the birthplace of Jock Hutchison.

Although born in St Andrews, Hutchison emigrated to America early in his life. In 1921 he returned to St Andrews to claim victory at the Old Course in a play-off against the famous Amateur, Roger Wethered. Hutchison was the first US based player to win The Open

On his boat voyage back to America with the Claret Jug, Hutchison, also know as 'Jovial Jock' is quoted singing,

"Sailing, sailing, over the bounding main
For many a stormy wind shall blow
'Ere we go back again."

06/07/2020
The Open

The Open

The Open for the Ages 🏆 You’ll never have seen anything like this. 16 - 19 July

It is #Mondayblog time again from Lauren. We were delighted with the response from last week's blog, thank you for engag...
06/07/2020

It is #Mondayblog time again from Lauren.

We were delighted with the response from last week's blog, thank you for engaging with Lauren's research. This week she looks at women's competitive golf...

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been working on a 10,000 word piece of writing on the development of women’s golf in Scotland from the mid-nineteenth century to the interwar period. In this week’s blog, I will focus on the development of competitive golf for women.

The formation of governing bodies to represent the interests of women golfers can be argued to have given birth to competitive golf for women. Within three months of their formation, the Ladies Golf Union (LGU) had organised the first British Amateur Open Championship for women.

The competition was held at St Anne’s golf course in Lancashire from the 13th-18th June 1893. Lady Margaret Scott defeated the LGU Secretary Miss Issette Pearson in the final, becoming the first British Ladies Amateur Open champion.

Although this competition was welcome to all LGU affiliated clubs in Britain, only English clubs participated. It is important of course to note that when the LGU was formed, The St Andrews Ladies Putting Club was the only club in Scotland to attend the meeting. At this meeting Agnes Grainger, a member of both St Andrews Ladies Putting Club and the St Rule Club, stated that as the club was a putting club, they would not enter any competitions. Surprised to hear from her friend and LGU supporter, Dr William Laidlaw-Purves that there were many talented Scottish female golfers, Issette Pearson was eager to encourage more Scottish women to enter the Ladies British Open.

To this end, the 1897 championship was held at Gullane, where there was a record entry of 102 women. The Scots dominated the competition and Edith Orr from North Berwick Ladies Golf Club, defeated her sister Theodora in the final.
In 1908, the Ladies British Amateur Open Championship was held at the Old Course in St Andrews.

The competition marked three hundred years since women were allowed to host a competition on the Old Course and was not only a big step for women’s golf, but also for women’s liberation more generally. The establishment of the Ladies British Amateur Open by the LGU paved the way for more competitions both at home and abroad.

The Scottish Ladies Close Amateur Championship was established in 1903, with an English equivalent being established in 1912. It was open to all Scottish ladies, ladies with Scottish parentage, or those who had lived in Scotland for at least five years, with a handicap of eighteen or less. The first competition was held in St Andrews with Old Tom Morris, custodian of the links, as starter. Alice Glover defeated Molly Graham in the final.

An interest in international competition for women can be argued to have begun in 1905, when sisters Margaret and Harriet Curtis travelled to Cromar to compete in the British Ladies Amateur Open. In 1913 the Curtis sisters began promoting an international competition between the USA, Canada and Britain, however this had to be postponed when the First World War broke out in 1914.

These efforts continued after the war and in 1927 the Curtis sisters donated a bowl as a trophy. In 1931, the LGU and SLGA agreed to the establishment of the Curtis Cup and in May 1932 the first competition was held. The competition was then held every two years alternating between American and British golf courses. The British team for the first Curtis Cup championship included Wanda Morgan, Enid Wilson, Mrs J.B Watson, Molly Gourlay, Doris Park, Diana Fishwick and Elis Corlett and Joyce Wethered as Captain.

Around the same time, the Vagliano Cup between France and Britain was also established, with the donation of a trophy by Andre Vagliano in 1931. Both championships were closely followed by the Commonwealth Tasman Cup established in 1933.

#sportingheritage #womensgolf

Address

Bruce Embankment
St Andrews
KY16 9AB

Opening Hours

Monday 09:30 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:30 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:30 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

01334 460046

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Comments

Can anyone authenticate this sign? Solid wood and hand painted over 2 feet radius. seen similar small signs online with paintings like the one on the bottom, however they were smaller in size.
I just visited this site for the first time and I noticed photos of biscuits, coffee, pancakes, "wet sands", meetings in the cafe, selfies, glasses of champagne and the like. I was looking for the bronze sculpture "Faces of Golf" by the incomparable artist Lawrence Holofcener which was unveiled and donated to the museum on July 14, 2015. I scrolled through years and years of postings and did not see the gifted sculpture. As someone who worked on this project, brought it to the museum and set up the unveiling, I'm surprised and disappointed in not seeing the bronze. Has it been removed?
Fantastic visit! Special mention to the Yorkshire lady that was ever so lovely by recommending places to visit in town. Easy to park and such a beautiful town to visit, not just for golf lovers! 10 out of 10!
** WANT TO WIN A £250 4-BALL GOLF VOUCHER FOR LUNDIN LINKS GC IN FIFE? COMPLETE THE SURVEY LINK BELOW TO ENTER THE PRIZE DRAW! ** Lundin Links is a top-30 ranked Scottish Golf Course and used as a qualifying venue for the Open when played in St Andrews. https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/onlinegolf The survey will only take approximately 3 minutes to complete. It is run by students from the University of St Andrews. Thank you for taking the time to answer the questions!
If you like hickory golf clubs give your like and share this page, you will see rares and collectables hickory clubs.Its not a commercial page https://www.facebook.com/Bestclubmakers.hickoryandvintage.golfclubs/
I am in the possession of a putter with the following writing on it: R C Wilson UK Special made in Scotland . Please send me any information that you may have regarding this putter. It was found in a basement in a very old home in New Jersey. Thank you in advance for any trouble this may cause.
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Excellent museum but the cafe is a train wreck! Walked out twice this week, first time we were shown to our table and waited for 10minutes only to be told they stopped serving lunch 5minutes ago!! Today we eventually got shown to a table (without a view) despite numerous other tables being empty but not cleared! We had to go and get a menu ourselves and eventually gave up after no one came to serve us after 15mins. Nice venue but urgently needs more staff!!!
A message from your friends at Old Course Loenen, the Netherlands. Old times came to life again this weekend when two, mediaeval dressed, teams 'replayed' the very first 'colf' match 'ever' through the narrow streets of the pittoresk Dutch town of Loenen aan de Vecht. The commemoration was organized on occasion of the 10 year anniversary of the local "Old Course Loenen' Golfclub, situated on only a 'par-4'-distance from the place where it all took place for the first time in 1297.
Hi, I have a papier mache tray around 60-70 cm in diametre. It is painted green on the base and lip. In the centre is a painting of, whome I presume to be, Old Tom Morris playing golf. Around the perifery of the tray is painted Royal and Ancient Golf Club Saint Andrews. The tray is obviously old but in perfect condition. Is it rare as I cannot find any iformation on the internet about it. I would be most grateful for a reply. Helen