Military History Man

Military History Man MHM (Military History Man) specialize in military history research in the UK, Commonwealth and USA for museums, archives, television, radio and for people wishing to know more about their military family history.
(4)

I am a Manchester based Historical Researcher and I specialise mainly on the Manchester Regiment and the First World War. Although, I do take enquiries on any regiment from the British Army and any time period. Academically, I have a Masters Degree in History from the University of Manchester. I also studied at the University of Salford on the Contemporary Military and International History course, achieving a 2.1 degree with honours. So far i have helped hundreds of people find their military ancestors. As far as military researchers in Manchester goes, I am one of the only ones. So, if you wish for me to conduct family history research for you please feel free to get in touch for a free quote. Hopefully I can help put you metaphorically in the boots of your ancestor.

Mission: Our mission is to provide first class research and consultation on all things military history related. We achieve this mission by thoroughly conducting research on topics set by our clients. This involves travelling to museums, archives and scouring online sources to get the answers our clients are looking for. Once we have identified a source, we make copies, digest the information and write it up in the form of a report pack, which at the end of the research, we make fully available to our clients. Our reports are both highly detailed and easy to digest, making it not only interesting, but accessible and satisfying. Depending on what your mission is, we will adapt to meet that goal. To do this, we offer a free consultation on how we can assist you. Here we will discuss how we can help you, fees and what level of research you would like. For more information, please feel free to send us a message.

01/07/2016

100 years ago this morning, marks the beginning of the Battle of the Somme. A battle in which nearly 20,000 British and Commonwealth soldiers lost their lives. A battle which men from Manchester took the heavily fortified town of Montauban.

Without the doubt, on a whole the Somme was a disaster on the first day. However, the 30th Division containing many pals battalions from the North West, achieved all of their objectives. Without a doubt, for the men of the Manchester Regiment, it was one of their finest hours.

Please take time to read my latest article in the Tameside Reporter and the GM1914 blog.

To the fallen, we will remember you.

29/06/2016

With the centenary of the Battle of the Somme fast approaching, steer your eyes to this footage. Much of this documentary is filmed at the battle and is the first battlefield footage ever recorded.

Curious as to what your ancestor got up to during this action? Please feel free to get in touch.

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/battle-of-the-somme

24/01/2016

In the coming weeks, we shall have a new website! In the meantime, please get in touch through the facebook or twitter pages, or simply write to us regarding military family history!

08/12/2015

Give the gift of your very own military family history this Christmas. Get in touch to see what we can provide for you! #familyhistory #ww1 #ManchesterRegiment

10/11/2015

With armistice day approaching tomorrow, why not find out what your ancestors did in past wars #ww1 #familyhistory

27/09/2015

Recently we reached 700 likes, thank you for everyone's continued support! Get in touch to find more about your military ancestors!

22/07/2015

In researching Private James Henry Hurst, we have became very attached to the 18th Battalion Manchester Regiment. In a time when malnourishment in Manchester was rife, only 5% of the lads who turned up to join the 18th were turned away. A very fit and strong bunch. This did them much good at their first action, the Battle of the Somme, 1st July 1916.

14/07/2015

Assisted three French ladies in finding their Great Grandfather who was a British soldier, serving in France during the First World War. We believe to have found him, he was a Military Medal winner who served with 29 Coy Royal Engineers. We also believe he was a mechanical engineer. An Interesting story of love while in the midst of war.

13/07/2015

Now researching Pte. James Henry Hurst of the Manchester Regiment.

20/06/2015

Now the 200 year anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo has passed, have you ever wondered if you had an ancestor who was present on that glorious day?

Enquire today and find out!

24/05/2015

Research complete on the 36th Battalion Home Guard during the Second World War.

Did your ancestor serve at home during the Second World War? Find out through Military History Man.

24/04/2015

As ANZAC day approaches and we remember the events of the past week, 100 years ago. I would like to share with you a personal favourite poem dedicated to the noble Tommy.

Tommy,

I went into a public 'ouse to get a pint o' beer,
The publican 'e up an' sez, " We serve no red-coats here."
The girls be'ind the bar they laughed an' giggled fit to die,
I outs into the street again an' to myself sez I:
O it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' " Tommy, go away " ;
But it's " Thank you, Mister Atkins," when the band begins to play
The band begins to play, my boys, the band begins to play,
O it's " Thank you, Mister Atkins," when the band begins to play.

I went into a theatre as sober as could be,
They gave a drunk civilian room, but 'adn't none for me;
They sent me to the gallery or round the music-'alls,
But when it comes to fightin', Lord! they'll shove me in the stalls!
For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' " Tommy, wait outside ";
But it's " Special train for Atkins " when the trooper's on the tide
The troopship's on the tide, my boys, the troopship's on the tide,
O it's " Special train for Atkins " when the trooper's on the tide.

Yes, makin' mock o' uniforms that guard you while you sleep
Is cheaper than them uniforms, an' they're starvation cheap.
An' hustlin' drunken soldiers when they're goin' large a bit
Is five times better business than paradin' in full kit.
Then it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an` Tommy, 'ow's yer soul? "
But it's " Thin red line of 'eroes " when the drums begin to roll
The drums begin to roll, my boys, the drums begin to roll,
O it's " Thin red line of 'eroes, " when the drums begin to roll.

We aren't no thin red 'eroes, nor we aren't no blackguards too,
But single men in barricks, most remarkable like you;
An' if sometimes our conduck isn't all your fancy paints,
Why, single men in barricks don't grow into plaster saints;
While it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an` Tommy, fall be'ind,"
But it's " Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind
There's trouble in the wind, my boys, there's trouble in the wind,
O it's " Please to walk in front, sir," when there's trouble in the wind.

You talk o' better food for us, an' schools, an' fires, an' all:
We'll wait for extry rations if you treat us rational.
Don't mess about the cook-room slops, but prove it to our face
The Widow's Uniform is not the soldier-man's disgrace.
For it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an` Chuck him out, the brute! "
But it's " Saviour of 'is country " when the guns begin to shoot;
An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please;
An 'Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool - you bet that Tommy sees!

Rudyard Kipling

Today we surpassed 700 likes on the Military History Man page. We thank you all for joining us, have a look at ...
20/04/2015
Military History Man

Today we surpassed 700 likes on the Military History Man page. We thank you all for joining us, have a look at how we can help research your military family history:

http://www.militaryhistoryman.co.uk/

Professional Military based genealogical research service based in Manchester, UK.

We also do German First World War records. Although, this is much more difficult than British and Commonwealth forces.Hi...
14/04/2015
i.imgur.com

We also do German First World War records. Although, this is much more difficult than British and Commonwealth forces.

Hier sind wir auch deutsche Ersten Weltkrieg Aufzeichnungen zu tun. Obwohl , das ist viel schwieriger, als britische und Commonwealth-Truppen .

http://i.imgur.com/HawiwGh.png

09/04/2015

Three more likes to get Military History Man to 700 likes?

08/04/2015

Today I finished typing up and digitising the 9th Battalion Manchester Regiment War Diary during the First World War. It took almost a years worth of time and dedication. However, it is now a fantastic resource for anyone wishing to look up this battalion.

The first battlefield video footage ever recorded at the Battle of the Somme, July 1916. If you watch closely you can se...
28/03/2015
British Tommies On The Somme

The first battlefield video footage ever recorded at the Battle of the Somme, July 1916. If you watch closely you can see British troops moving out in good order, some drop from time to time. Very moving footage.

http://www.britishpathe.com/video/british-tommies/query/the+battle+of+the+somme

British Pathe, the world's leading multimedia resource with a history stretching back over a century. The finest and most comprehensive archive of fabulous footage and stunning stills.

26/03/2015

Sifting through over 300 men named William Boyd to find one which won the Military Medal. Definitely our most challenging piece of research so far. Luckily, here we like a challenge. If you are stuck with your military family history, get in touch and see how we can help.

24/03/2015

Pte. William Boyd MM is quite the mysterious one, this is turning into one of the most difficult enquiries I have had to deal with of yet. Possibly cracked it, but there will be a lot of surprised faces once my report is finished.

Address

19 St Hildas View, Audenshaw
Manchester
M34 5JJ

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Military History Man posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Military History Man:

Category

Nearby museums


Comments

MY GREAT GRANDFATHER HISTORY RIP WAINWRIGHT When Frederick went to France, he was serving as Private 352556 of the Manchester Regiment. This number is known to be from a block (350001 to 375000) that was issued to the regiment for a renumbering scheme in March 1917. It was specifically for allocation to men who were serving at the time with the regiment’s 9th Battalion. The records of men numbered around Frederick imply that his original number was probably 5135. He was among a batch of men who were mobilised to begin training on 12 May 1916, and all of the examples we found had enlisted voluntarily during the short-lived existence of the “Group System” of recruiting. Service in France and Flanges the battalion left Colchester and sailed from Folkestone to Boulogne on 4 March. on 9 October 1917. It was part of a large-scale action that has the official name of the Battle of Poelcapelle. It is considered to be a phase of the Third Battles of Ypres offensive. It is apparent that Frederick was officially announced as being wounded during the attack, for he is listed as such by the War Office on 18 October 1917. This is curious, for it is unusually soon after the event. Most men appeared on casualty lists a month or so after they had been wounded. It also appears that his family were informed. All else, however, points to this being a on 9 October 1917. It was part of a large-scale action that has the official name of the Battle of Poelcapelle. It is considered to be a phase of the Third Battles of Ypres offensive. It is apparent that Frederick was officially announced as being wounded during the attack, for he is listed as such by the War Office on 18 October 1917. This is curious, for it is unusually soon after the event. Most men appeared on casualty lists a month or so after they had been wounded. It also appears that his family were informed. All else, however, points to this being a rather sad case of misinformation. . By 22 December 1917 his family were appealing via the local newspaper for any information about him.Frederick’s next of kin (presumably his motherwould at some point have been officially informed that he was either missing or that he had been killed (but if so it would appear that this was after 22 December 1917). If the news was that he was missing, the family would then endure a period of six months in which official enquiries were made including exchange of information with Germany, in case the man had been captured or the germans could confirm his death). Just before this period ended, the War Office would check with the next of kin to see if they had received any news. If this was negative, the man’s death would be officially presumed. If an enquiry was raised via the Red Cross, for information from Germany, an index card would be raised. We could find no trace of any card for Frederick – which may imply that this route was not followed. Once the death had been presumed the normal legal processes would then take place at home, principally to settle his financial affairs. The “effects register” shows that money owed by the War Office outstanding unissued pay) was paid to his mother in March 1918 and (a war gratuity)a also went to her in November 1919. In theory, the family would have been sent Frederick’s effects; private possessions from his uniform and pack, the latter often left with battalion transport when the e man went into action. It could take several months for these things to arrive even from France But what of Frederick himself? The records of the CWGC list 117 officers and men of the battalion who lost their lives on 9 October 1917. 82 of them including Frederick Reginald Wainwright have either never been found or identified and are commemorated at the Tyne Cot Memorial. 29 others lie in the adjacent Tyne Cot Cemetery. The area in which they lost their lives was “combed” on many occasions after the war, but it had been subjected to heavy shellfire throughout much of 1918 and many battlefield graves had simply been destroyed. Remains of men are often found in the area and it may be that Frederick will be found one day