Friends of Heaton Hall

Friends of Heaton Hall The Friends of Heaton Hall exist to promote knowledge of this late 18th century neo-classical house. Sir Thomas was created Earl of Wilton in 1801.
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Heaton Hall was first built on this site around 1685, but was rebuilt to its present design in the 1770s by Sir Thomas Egerton, 7th Baronet, with James Wyatt as architect. The Orangery was built on to the eastern end of the hall by his grandson, the 2nd Earl of Wilton.

A piece of paper about A6 size folded, tucked away and forgotten about in the pages of Sir Thomas Egerton’s (later 1st E...
03/11/2023

A piece of paper about A6 size folded, tucked away and forgotten about in the pages of Sir Thomas Egerton’s (later 1st Earl Of Wilton) cash book for 1772 is this beautiful love poem to his wife, Eleanor. She must have been away from Heaton at the time. Who could blame her as the builders were in building the house we see today. Have deciphered all but one of the words, replaced with X’s.

Return return my lovely maid,
For summers pleasures pass away,
The trees green liv’nes ‘gin to fade
And floral treasures all decay
No more at ###### waile the sweet
Sad Philomel the woods among
Nor lark the rising morn doth greet
Return my love thou stay’st too long

At the start of the First World War Heaton Park was used to train the Manchester Regiment’s City Battalions.  They were ...
31/10/2023

At the start of the First World War Heaton Park was used to train the Manchester Regiment’s City Battalions. They were initially allocated tents, but very quickly huts were constructed in time for winter. One of the images below is the interior of one of the huts at Heaton. Certainly a step up from a tent, but still no more than a wooden shed and you were lucky to get a bed near the stove/heater to keep a bit warmer. Reveille was usually at 05.30am and the Postcard image pokes fun at a recruit getting an extra 10 minutes in bed, ‘’I don’t think’’.

Beneath the surface in all big country houses, (including Buckingham Palace), lurked an unwelcome guest, the brown rat. ...
25/10/2023

Beneath the surface in all big country houses, (including Buckingham Palace), lurked an unwelcome guest, the brown rat. Heaton Hall was no exception. With cellars covering the whole house beneath the ground floor, cellars containing large supplies of food, cellars that are dimly lit even today with electric lighting, but which must have been even dimmer in the days of candles, rats were a constant presence. Household accounts for 1798 contain an entry showing £4 : 4shillings being paid to Paul Henry "for killing rats." (a sum equivalent to more than £425 at today's values)

Salford artist Harold Riley passed away 6 months ago.  Amongst his works can be found 2 connected to Heaton Park.  The f...
24/10/2023

Salford artist Harold Riley passed away 6 months ago. Amongst his works can be found 2 connected to Heaton Park. The first is from 1952 titled ''A Boy And His Dog In Heaton Park''. The second is titled 'Heaton Park Easter Morning 1982'. Easter that year was in the middle of April. This sketch is of the staging for the Popes visit that was not until the end of May.

There was a touching ceremony yesterday outside Manchester Piccadilly station to commemorate the fifth anniversary of th...
19/10/2023

There was a touching ceremony yesterday outside Manchester Piccadilly station to commemorate the fifth anniversary of the unveiling of the ‘Victory Over Blindness’ statue.

The statue depicts seven blinded First World War soldiers leading one another away from the battlefield with their hand on the shoulder of the man in front. Realised by artist and sculptor Johanna Domke-Guyot, it stands proudly outside the station.
In the words of Blind Veterans UK ‘’There is no more appropriate location for this statue. The convalescent camp at Heaton Park treated and trained thousands of wounded First World War soldiers and sailors, including many with sight loss.’’ One of the images is of such a blind soldier, Tommy Milligan, treating a wounded soldier at Heaton
At Heaton during WW1 Major Tait McKenzie trained and employed blind masseurs to treat the injured. There were also Exhibition trenches in the park that charged an admission fee which was donated to Sir Arthur Pearson's work for the Blinded Heroes Fund, later named St Dunstans.

The fantastic Chelsea.Entwistle.Art was in Heaton Hall a month ago doing a sketch of the Saloon, which she so very kindl...
11/10/2023

The fantastic Chelsea.Entwistle.Art was in Heaton Hall a month ago doing a sketch of the Saloon, which she so very kindly donated to us. It is now on show at the hall, but sadly our next Open Day is not until April next year. She has now been commissioned to do the Salford 2024 Calendar. Keep tabs on this fantastic young artist via her page. For anybody with links to Salford this would be a great Christmas present dont you think? Fantastic work Chelsea (soon to be Mrs Davies)❤️

Beer was brewed at Heaton Hall from its earliest days as until the middle of the 19th century most water was unsafe to d...
10/10/2023

Beer was brewed at Heaton Hall from its earliest days as until the middle of the 19th century most water was unsafe to drink. For a history of ''Brewing Beer At Heaton House'' please check out the article by Michael Denham on our website at https://heatonhall.wordpress.com/ You have to page down a few articles to get to it. In one of Heatons old notebooks from the late 1700's is a recipe for ''Eleven Gallons Of Braggott''. There seems to be many different interpretations of what Braggott was/is but here is the Heaton recipe;;;; ''An ounce and a half of cinnamon, half an ounce of mace, one ounce of nutmeg, quarter of an ounce of cloves, one ounce of (base?) ginger and eight pound of fine Lisbon (hardened?) sugar. Bruise the spices and put them in a bag, boil all together in two gallons of old ale, for about ½ an hour and cover it up close and let it stand ‘till the next day, then put it in a clean barrel with some working small beer, fix your spice bag with a string about the middle of your barrel and when it has done working stop it close up and bottle at six weeks end.''

Even though our Open Days are finished until next April, the wonderful Jonathan Schofield is still doing a monthly guide...
08/10/2023

Even though our Open Days are finished until next April, the wonderful Jonathan Schofield is still doing a monthly guided tour. Great to see nearly 30 people wander around with sunlight streaming through the windows. A great day to be in the hall and the park. For details of his tours please check his website.... https://www.jonathanschofieldtours.com/heaton-hall-and-park-tour.html

A part of Sir Thomas Egertons (became 1st Earl Of Wilton) cash expenses book for early March 1772.  Busy time as in the ...
06/10/2023

A part of Sir Thomas Egertons (became 1st Earl Of Wilton) cash expenses book for early March 1772. Busy time as in the throes of Heaton Hall being designed and built, but on Wednesday 4th March 1772 he was spending 3 shillings on a new pair of gloves, losing 4 shillings at cards and giving 2 shillings and 6 pence 'Too a poor woman', presumably on his way from the glove shop to his club. The equivalent today is approx £28. From his expenses books it seems every time he was out in Manchester, or wherever, for business, going to his club, the theatre, etc, there is usually an entry for 2s/6d to a poor man or woman.

Great talk to Members today by Stephen Gill, Fellow Of The Royal Photographic Society, on……..Photography… of all things....
04/10/2023

Great talk to Members today by Stephen Gill, Fellow Of The Royal Photographic Society, on……..Photography… of all things. More to the point it was the history of photography and how to date your old photos. Great tips and after the talk he dated photos members had brought in for him to look at. Apologies for such a terrible photo to accompany this piece on photography.

A not so unusual view of a launch full of people on the boating lake.  But with this one comes the previously unknown (t...
27/09/2023

A not so unusual view of a launch full of people on the boating lake. But with this one comes the previously unknown (to us) name ‘St George’ as the name of the launch. It is from a collection of glass plate negatives bought at auction by David Whittworth that is gradually being scanned and brought back to life. The photographer was Harold Kenneth Hartley from Cheetham Hill who was a pupil at Manchester Grammar School 1921-1928. The gentleman to the far right in the bowler hat is Harolds father. Please visit and join the page 'Harold Kenneth Hartley, Manchester Grammar School pupil 1921-1928' where there are the images already scanned and of course many yet to come, some I am promised are of the park. There are quite a few of old Cheetham Hill too. Shared with the kind permission of David Whittworth. Image is his copyright.

Aerial view of the Hall and northwards beyond in early 1965.  Many things now different.  The Conservatory Café bottom l...
26/09/2023

Aerial view of the Hall and northwards beyond in early 1965. Many things now different. The Conservatory Café bottom left. Gardens in front of the house laid out in formal beds. Tennis courts. The old tennis changing rooms through the trees, middle left, was a leftover building from RAF Heaton Park. The GPO tower under construction. The Royal Observer Corp monitoring station next to it. No M66 motorway beyond the park wall. A very distant view of Old Hall Farm demolished for the motorway. This area beyond the park wall was, in 1936, the proposed area for an airport to serve North Manchester.

Honoured to host a visit from 'The Society Of Architectural Historians Of Great Britain' this morning at the hall.  Even...
23/09/2023

Honoured to host a visit from 'The Society Of Architectural Historians Of Great Britain' this morning at the hall. Even got a couple of 'Wows' from these battle hardened specialists.

The walled garden in Heaton Park has long since ceased to be used for its original purpose, which was to feed the family...
14/09/2023

The walled garden in Heaton Park has long since ceased to be used for its original purpose, which was to feed the family and servants who lived in the Hall. Its current use is as a garden centre, but the pictures shown here of a working walled garden show what it might have looked like when it was used for its original purpose. (Preston Park, Teesside)

A big THANK YOU to all that made it through our front doors over the last couple of days and indeed throughout this year...
11/09/2023

A big THANK YOU to all that made it through our front doors over the last couple of days and indeed throughout this year. Thank you for all your very generous donations at a time when the increasing prices of everything stretches household budgets. For our last day we had Chelsea.Entwistle.Art sketching in the hall. Loads of people stopped to talk to her. Thank you so much for presenting your drawing of the Saloon to us. It will be framed and displayed along with your painting of the south side of the hall.

Double trouble at the top of the stairs.  Last chance to go around the hall today until April next year.   Open at 12 mi...
10/09/2023

Double trouble at the top of the stairs. Last chance to go around the hall today until April next year. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions.

Honoured today to be visited by the Great, Great, Great, Great Granddaughter of the 2nd Earl Of Wilton through his daugh...
09/09/2023

Honoured today to be visited by the Great, Great, Great, Great Granddaughter of the 2nd Earl Of Wilton through his daughter Lady Katherine Grey Egerton (who married into the Earl Of Leicesters family). The family music gene courses through the generations as she is a violinist. Here she is in the middle.

As part of Heritage Open Days, St Margaret's Church will be open on Saturday 16th September from 10am to 4pm.  The land ...
08/09/2023

As part of Heritage Open Days, St Margaret's Church will be open on Saturday 16th September from 10am to 4pm. The land the church is built on was given by the 2nd Earl Of Wilton as well as much of the cash to actually build the church. The 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th Earls are buried here. Come in and have a leisurely stroll around. On St Margarets Road, Prestwich, M25 2QB.

During our Open Day this Sunday the wonderful Chelsea Entwistle will be painting 'live' in the Hall.  She is Artist In R...
06/09/2023

During our Open Day this Sunday the wonderful Chelsea Entwistle will be painting 'live' in the Hall. She is Artist In Residence for Salford City Council at Salford Precinct. She visited us last month and did a painting of the south side of the hall, the original of which now belongs to 'The Friends'. Check out her page at Chelsea.Entwistle.Art (Dont forget we are open Saturday as well)

Jonathan Schofield, Manchester Blue Badge Guide, will be back at the Hall next Sunday for his monthly guided tour.  Even...
03/09/2023

Jonathan Schofield, Manchester Blue Badge Guide, will be back at the Hall next Sunday for his monthly guided tour. Even if you have been in the hall before Jonathan will guide you through the history of the house and family to make it well worth another visit. For details of cost, times and to book please visit his website at... https://www.jonathanschofieldtours.com/heaton-hall-and-park-tour.html

Just a week to go before our next (and last for the year) Open Days. They will be next Saturday and Sunday 9th & 10th Se...
02/09/2023

Just a week to go before our next (and last for the year) Open Days. They will be next Saturday and Sunday 9th & 10th September. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions. Image from the August Open Day kindly shared by Rebecca Entwistle, a fish eye lens view of the Cupola Room.

Smithy Lodge takes its from the working smithy that was on Middleton Road just near the gates. Some of you may have seen...
25/08/2023

Smithy Lodge takes its from the working smithy that was on Middleton Road just near the gates. Some of you may have seen old photos of the smithy, but what was it like inside? These two pictures are of the interior of a reconstructed 19th century smithy (Preston Park Museum, Teesside). Repairing and making agricultural tools and implements and household metal goods; and putting new shoes on horses - these were just some of the smithy jobs that were essential to everyday life in the 18th and 19th centuries. And much of their trade must have come from the Heaton Estate itself.

Advance warning of our last open days for this year. They will be on Saturday and Sunday 9th & 10th September.  Open at ...
24/08/2023

Advance warning of our last open days for this year. They will be on Saturday and Sunday 9th & 10th September. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions. Image from the August Open Day kindly shared by Rebecca Entwistle.

Many thanks to all our visitors today and for your generous donations.  It really is appreciated.  Also thanks to Rebecc...
13/08/2023

Many thanks to all our visitors today and for your generous donations. It really is appreciated. Also thanks to Rebecca Entwistle who has shared some of her images from her visit today, including this one. Over 300 of you got through the front door and if you had a question I hope it got answered. One that didn't get answered was how much would £350 in 1772 be worth today (the amount that was paid to Joseph Rose for his plasterwork). Well its about £70,000.

It's our Open Day this Sunday, 13th August. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (do...
08/08/2023

It's our Open Day this Sunday, 13th August. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions.

Following on from our previous post on Damstead Wood there are two areas very nearby called Brick Hill Field and Hill 60...
06/08/2023

Following on from our previous post on Damstead Wood there are two areas very nearby called Brick Hill Field and Hill 60.
Brick Hill Field is by the left hand side of the main drive to the hall from Grand Lodge, with the area of the old paddling pool to its south side. On the 1750 Estate Map it is named as Brick Hill Fields, but has been known as Kiln Field or Brick Kiln Field and would indicate that a kiln was on or near to this site. No archaeological work has been done to find any such kilns. Heaton Hall is built of bricks, with a stone cladding on the exterior and large blocks of stone used for solid features such as columns. The stone was brought in from quarries in Lancashire. A letter from March 1775 refers to a delivery of stone from Billinge, another dated April 1777 talks of 25 tons of stone from Stockton Heath. Considering that Thomas Egerton had commercial stone quarries of his own at nearby Cockey Moor it would seem that particular types of stone were required for particular purposes. In a letter of Arpril 1778 Sir Thomas was writing to his Agent at Heaton that, ‘’as we have hitherto had great difficulty in getting the large stones, I told John Turner……when working in the quarry he got the ones that suited us, he might put them aside till he got a load and then send it to Heaton.’’ The stone was transported along the Bridgewater Canal as far as Manchester and from there by road to Heaton.
Brick Hill Field also had a very important use during WW2 when the RAF used Heaton Park as an Aircrew Despatch Centre. The field housed the ‘Billeting & Reception’ unit office and would have been the first port of call for all personnel coming to RAF Heaton Park. Probably more importantly it housed the ‘Cinema Hut’ and a ‘Double Blister Hanger’ where many of the concerts and dances were held.
Hill 60 is in the very large field at the end of the old paddling pool area. The site of many a broken sledge during snowy periods, it is named after a battle during the 1st World War. It is widely thought to have been given that name by soldiers from the Manchester Regiment who had trained in the park and many had returned to the park after being wounded, for treatment and rehabilitation. The Manchester Regiment were involved at Ypres in the Battle Of Hill 60 in the spring and summer of 1915 where they held their position, without relief, for three months. In the July they were moved to the Somme.

The autumn schedule is out for paid tours of the hall by Manchester Blue Badge Guide Jonathan Schofield.  Next one is Su...
04/08/2023

The autumn schedule is out for paid tours of the hall by Manchester Blue Badge Guide Jonathan Schofield. Next one is Sunday 13th August at 11am, then monthly on 10th September, 8th October, 12th November and 10th December. Highly recommended. For details of dates and costs please see his website.....https://www.jonathanschofieldtours.com/heaton-hall-and-park-tour.html

Correction to the last post.  2 images were posted saying they were from 1858.  An eagle eyed follower spotted that the ...
02/08/2023

Correction to the last post. 2 images were posted saying they were from 1858. An eagle eyed follower spotted that the fashions on show were more akin to about 1900. She was right. I was wrong. The images are from 1895 when the future 5th Earl, Arthur, was returning to Heaton with his new bride the Hon Mariota Thellusson, daughter of the 5th Baron Rendlesham. I had saved the wrong newspaper article with the images. Only 40 years and two Earls wrong? As my old school reports used to say....must do better.(MH)

Ever heard of Damstead Wood in Heaton Park?  Didn’t think so.  It is the woodland behind the Lakeside Café. On a 1750 es...
27/07/2023

Ever heard of Damstead Wood in Heaton Park? Didn’t think so. It is the woodland behind the Lakeside Café. On a 1750 estate plan done for Sir Thomas Grey Egerton the field where these trees were subsequently planted was called ‘Damstead’. The origin of the name was never recorded but can be speculated on. ‘Dam’ can mean a small pond (of which there were two) or a physical barrier across a stream or river. The stream that fed the paddling pool passed through Damstead field on its journey down to the River Irk. ‘Stead’ usually meant house or dwelling. Some of the Beech trees in the wood are amongst the oldest in the park and the same age as those in The Dell and along the perimeter wall by the motorway.

Reports from the 1920’s place Nightingales nesting in this wood. Some of the earliest photographs we have of Heaton are from October 1858 and record the return to Heaton of Arthur Edward Holland Grey Egerton (who became the 3rd Earl) and his bride of 2 months Lady Elizabeth Charlotte Louisa Craven, daughter of the 2nd Earl Of Craven They had arrived at London Road Station at 3pm and were driven up to Heaton in the Earls best carriage drawn by four cream coloured horses. The entrance at Grand lodge was covered with an avenue of 40ft columns of flowers and a triumphal arch of flowers with the Wilton arms. Columns of flowers decorated the avenue up to the Hall, with another triumphal arch of flags and flowers at Damstead Gate, see picture. This old gateway was by the junction of the main avenue and the pathway coming in from Church Lodge (now the entrance opposite the Metro Station).

An appropriate post for a Sunday is an aspect of the religious life of the Earls & Countesses of Wilton.  All were churc...
23/07/2023

An appropriate post for a Sunday is an aspect of the religious life of the Earls & Countesses of Wilton. All were churchgoers and would leave Heaton Park for St Mary’s Parish Church by the gate that is opposite the present day Heaton Park Metro Station. This was originally called Church Lodge and originally on the southern side of the gateway. This was demolished when the railway was built and rebuilt on the northern side of the gateway and over time acquired the name of Station Lodge. No image of the older gate lodge is known to exist.
An examination of the books that were in the library at Heaton shows about three dozen books/folios on religious topics and teachings, some in French, some in Italian, some in Latin. There were also 7 copies of the Holy Bible, one from 1576 and bibles from 1756 belonging to Lady Assheton who married the 1st Earl in 1769 (just plain Sir Thomas Egerton then), 1631 in Latin, 1772 in French and 1804 belonging to Lady Mary Margaret Stanley who married the 2nd Earl in 1821.
There were also 12 editions of the ‘Book Of Common Prayer’, the oldest being from 1669.

Last year saw the 250th anniversary of the building of Heaton Hall and we know there was a house on the same site that w...
14/07/2023

Last year saw the 250th anniversary of the building of Heaton Hall and we know there was a house on the same site that was incorporated into the hall that had been the home of the Holland family for generations.
Now lets go back a few thousand years to the Bronze Age, which started in Britain around 2000 BC.
To our knowledge 3 items have been found at Heaton that go back to the Bronze Age.
The first is a Socketed Axe that was found during the excavations for the reservoir in the 1910’s. A source from 1936 states;;; A socketed bronze axe was found during the construction of the reservoir at Heaton Park, Manchester. The implement, which has a square socket, measures 78mm long by 51mm wide. It is not known where the axe is now.;;;;; So it’s lost, and an enquiry with Manchester Museum reveals they don’t have it.
However the enquiry with the museum revealed they do have 2 Bronze Age items from Heaton.
One is a Middle Bronze Age small leaf shaped spear head, the other being an Early Bronze Age perforated stone axe-hammer.
So the next time you wander around Heaton’s leafy glades or fields you will probably be treading in the same footprints of our Bronze Age inhabitants.
Please note the images are not the original Heaton finds, but very similar from elsewhere.

A big 'THANK YOU' to the over 300 people who made it through the front door today.  Overwhelmed by the many encouraging ...
09/07/2023

A big 'THANK YOU' to the over 300 people who made it through the front door today. Overwhelmed by the many encouraging comments from all you lovely people and for your generous donations at a time when budgets are stretched. Thank You!

Don't know if there will be this sort of a rush tomorrow (Sunday 9th) but it's 'Open Day' at Heaton Hall.  Open at 12 mi...
08/07/2023

Don't know if there will be this sort of a rush tomorrow (Sunday 9th) but it's 'Open Day' at Heaton Hall. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions.

Just a week until our next 'Open Day' on Sunday 9th July.  Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Fr...
02/07/2023

Just a week until our next 'Open Day' on Sunday 9th July. Open at 12 midday, last entry 3.45pm, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions.

September is a little way off just yet but Heaton Hall will be open on Saturday & Sunday 9th & 10th of September as part...
25/06/2023

September is a little way off just yet but Heaton Hall will be open on Saturday & Sunday 9th & 10th of September as part of the Heritage Open Days festival of history and culture. If you’ve already been this year why not visit somewhere else? The festival lasts from 8th to 17th September. Check out their website and use the ‘Search’ facility for somewhere that might just tickle your fancy.

Welcome to England’s largest festival of history and culture! Every September thousands of volunteers across England organise events to celebrate our fantastic history and culture. It's your chance to see hidden places and try out new experiences – all of which are FREE to explore. Heritage Op...

21/06/2023

Old family cine footage shared with us by Karen Lesley. 30 secs showing the boats and launch on the boating lake about 1964.

A big 'Thank You' to those that visited us yesterday.  Thankfully the weather held off until closing time.  Hope you mad...
19/06/2023

A big 'Thank You' to those that visited us yesterday. Thankfully the weather held off until closing time. Hope you made it home dry.

Last call for our 'Open Day' of Heaton Hall this Sunday, 18th June.  Open at 12 midday, everyone out by 4pm. Free to ent...
15/06/2023

Last call for our 'Open Day' of Heaton Hall this Sunday, 18th June. Open at 12 midday, everyone out by 4pm. Free to enter (donations gratefully received), no booking required. Not a guided tour, but you are free to wander around the open rooms where there are information banners and volunteers from 'The Friends' to hopefully answer any questions.

Ever wondered what filled the empty spaces of Heaton Hall?Well, these two chairs were from the original furniture at Hea...
13/06/2023

Ever wondered what filled the empty spaces of Heaton Hall?
Well, these two chairs were from the original furniture at Heaton in the 1770’s. They passed through auction many years ago, price unknown. This is what the auction catalogue had to say;
A PAIR OF GEORGE III GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS FROM HEATON HALL A highly important pair of George III giltwood armchairs of large proportions, the design attributed to James Wyatt and possibly executed by John Linnell, the carved crest rail and seat rail centered with swag drapery, the channelled frames of the shaped backs and seats carved with lamb’s tongue pattern and beading, the downswept padded arms with acanthus carving, on square tapering legs headed by paterae, each with finely detailed lamb’s tongue carving on three sides, terminating in carved block toes, both upholstered in dark green woven silk. English, circa 1775
Provenance: Commissioned by Sir Thomas Egerton 7th Bt, later 1st Earl of Wilton for Heaton Hall, Manchester; By descent until sold by 7th Earl of Wilton at Christie’s, July 14, 1949, lot 76 (set of six)
The most famous advocate of neo-classicism in England was the Scottish architect, Robert Adam. However, it was his greatest rival, James Wyatt (1746-1813), who was commissioned to remodel Heaton Hall for Sir Thomas Egerton. Wyatt was only twenty in 1766 when he returned to London from five years of studying classical architecture in Italy. He was soon made an associate of the Royal Academy in 1770 and two years later was given this commission. The Saloon was the grandest of all Heaton’s reception rooms, placed at the centre of the house with a columned screen at one end and a bowed front overlooking the gardens at the other. Suitably grand furniture was commissioned for this room apparently to Wyatt’s designs. Among the furniture supplied were these magnificent chairs, originally part of a set of six and unusual in their scale and design. Their specific design for the Saloon is further enforced by the detail of the frames that incorporate the beading, stiff leaf ornament, paterae and drapery that recur in the room’s spectacular plaster work on the ceiling by Giovanni Battista Maini. So successful was the design of the plasterwork that Wyatt later had various elements recreated in his own house in London. Although the maker of these chairs is not firmly recorded, they have previously been associated with the Oxford Street firm of Gillow of London and Lancaster due to a recorded invoice to Sir Thomas Egerton for £127.0.0 between 1777 and 1779. It is known that Wyatt also often worked with John Linnell on important commissions particularly at Heveningham Hall, Suffolk, Ammerdown House, Somerset and Shardeloes. This attribution to Linnell can be supported by the fact that the carved and gilded drapery in these chairs is found on other examples of known pieces by Linnell, in particular a set of armchairs and settees attributed to him now the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Following on from our last post on the talk by Elaine Taylor of The Lancashire Gardens Trust a few people stayed back af...
09/06/2023

Following on from our last post on the talk by Elaine Taylor of The Lancashire Gardens Trust a few people stayed back after Elaine had finished the final part of her presentation outside the Orangery. Whilst we were talking about all things Heaton around our lovely listed Sundial, dated 1756, I was looking at it as I had done a hundred times before. In all those times what I had not seen was the ‘Ouroboros’ around the foot of the pedestal of the Sundial. Ours seems to be in the form of a Dragon eating its own tail as opposed to the usual Snake. This feature can symbolize many things including; the eternal cycle of life, death, rebirth, fertility.
It was made by Daniel Clegg Joiner of Manchester. All sources say his surname is ‘Joner’ but if you actually look at the thing it says Joiner. A case of someone getting it wrong to start with and everyone else copying. We persuaded Historic England to change its listing a few years ago. The Sundial was from the house that preceded the hall that you see now. The older house was largely torn down and the new one built from the 1770’s. The dial was originally sited on the path down from the tunnel to the bandstand in The Dell. Its first 150 years saw it largely unscathed. Its last 100 years sees it to the sorry state it is in today. Inscription on the dial is ‘Sic Transit Gloria Mundi’ or Thus passes the glory of the world.

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M252SW

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*Sunday 19th June*
Heaton Hall Open Days😃

The fabulous Friends of Heaton Hall are delighted to invite the public into Heaton Hall, immerse yourself in the history of this amazing building while you wander unguided through the hall.
12pm - 4pm

Sunday 19th June
Sunday 10th July
Sunday 14th August
Saturday and Sunday 10th and 11th September
🙂🎈 4 O Y E A R S I N C E T H E P O P E S V I S I T 🎈🙂

History was made in Heaton Park 40 years ago today when John Paul II became the first Pope to visit Britain. More than 250,000 people packed into the Park to hear Pope John Paul II celebrate Mass and ordain 12 priests. Before celebrating the open-air Mass the Pope planted a young Whitebeam tree in the Park, as a lasting symbol of this visit.

Picture and text courtesy of Colette Heavey

There's some footage here https://youtu.be/Nl22MdZqYJQ
Friends of Heaton Hall
I'm interested to know if there is a 'History of Heaton Park' in existence and, if so, who the author is.
Just published, available from the author.
A History of Bury New Road, including Broughton, Kersal and Sedgley
Go to www.all-things-considered.org and click on the link
£16 · MANCHESTER, ENGLAND
Has the hall ever been open to the public before, other than heritage days etc?
🥰🏘️ D A T E S F O R Y O U R D I A R Y 🏘️🥰

*TODAY*
Heaton Hall Open Days😃

The fabulous Friends of Heaton Hall are delighted to invite the public into Heaton Hall, immerse yourself in the history of this amazing building while you wander unguided through the hall.
12pm - 4pm

Sunday 11th April
Sunday 8th May
Sunday 19th June
Sunday 10th July
Sunday 14th August
Saturday and Sunday 10th and 11th September
🥰🏘️ D A T E S F O R Y O U R D I A R Y 🏘️🥰

Heaton Hall Open Day - this Sunday😃

The fabulous Friends of Heaton Hall are delighted to invite the public into Heaton Hall, immerse yourself in the history of this amazing building while you wander unguided through the hall.
12pm - 4pm

Sunday 8th May
Sunday 19th June
Sunday 10th July
Sunday 14th August
Saturday and Sunday 10th and 11th September

🥰🏘️ D A T E S F O R Y O U R D I A R Y 🏘️🥰

Heaton Hall Open Days😃

The fabulous Friends of Heaton Hall are delighted to invite the public into Heaton Hall, immerse yourself in the history of this amazing building while you wander unguided through the hall.
12pm - 4pm

Sunday 8th May
Sunday 19th June
Sunday 10th July
Sunday 14th August
Saturday and Sunday 10th and 11th September
Thank you so much for facilitating the open day today. It was great to finally get a look around and it’s far more magnificent than I expected. Such a beautiful building.
🙂 🏛️ D I D Y O U K N O W❓🏛️ 🙂

The Friends of Heaton Hall don't just love Heaton Hall they are an integral part of the park community. The friends work hard to promote awareness of the hall and facilitate its conservation, they do this in many ways such as....

🏛️Giving their time to open days so the public can see the interior and learn more.
🏛️Operating the page with updates, stories and pictures.
🏛️Giving talks relating to the hall and the family history to schools and organisations such as the Women's Institute.
🏛️ Involvement in fund raising and heritage events.
🏛️ They actively participate in park committees including park signage and important Commemorations such as the beautiful Somme Memorial.
🏛️Participation in conservation on the building and interiors by damage and condition reporting.

The Heaton Park team are grateful to all our friends groups and appreciate their contributions to our Park community.❤

Find out more about the hall and the friends at their next open day on the 10th April between 12pm - 4pm completely free and no need to book.🙂

Hello, I've seen a lot of references to forthcoming guided tours of the hall led by yourselves. I've found the dates but I don't see start times or booking details anywhere. Can you advise, please?