City Road Chapel

City Road Chapel Wesley's Chapel is a Methodist church in London that was built under the direction of John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist movement. It is now a place of worship and visitor attraction, incorporating the Museum of Methodism in its crypt and John Wesley's House next to the chapel.HistoryThe chapel opened in 1778 to replace John Wesley's earlier London chapel, the Foundery, where he first preached on 11 November 1739.

In 1776 Wesley applied to the City of London for a site to build his new chapel and was granted an area of land on City Road. After raising funds the foundation stone for the chapel was laid on 21 April 1777. The architect was George Dance the Younger, surveyor to the City of London.Along with the associated Leysian Mission, Wesley's Chapel is a circuit of the London District of the Methodist Church. The chapel has an average Sunday service attendance of about 440.The first woman to preach there was Agnes Elizabeth Slack.Architecture and internal featuresThe building has Grade I listed status and is a fine example of Georgian architecture although it has been altered and improved since it was built. In 1864 the gallery was modernised, its front lowered and raked seating installed. The original pillars supporting it were ships' masts donated by King George III but in 1891 they were replaced by French jasper pillars donated from Methodist churches overseas. Stained glass is a later addition. An organ was installed in 1882 and the present organ in 1891. It was electrified in 1905 and in 1938 its pipes were moved to their present position at the rear of the gallery. The communion rail was a gift from former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who was married in the chapel in 1951.

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