Natural History Museum, London

Natural History Museum, London In the face of a #PlanetaryEmergency, we're working to create a future where both people & planet thrive. Museum open 11-6, Wed-Sun - entry is free, booking essential.
(64912)

Open with service changes

What's it like being a researcher on a field trip to a remote Icelandic fjord? In the summer of 2019, a team of research...
10/09/2020
Life on the edge: researching a hydrothermal vent in Iceland

What's it like being a researcher on a field trip to a remote Icelandic fjord? In the summer of 2019, a team of researchers travelled to Iceland to study a hydrothermal vent.
The animals living on this vent might help us understand how life has adapted to these unique underwater places.

What's it like to go on a research trip to Iceland to discover the the origins of life?

#OnThisDay 5 years ago, scientists announced the discovery of a new species of ancient human.Homo naledi's surprising co...
10/09/2020
Homo naledi, your recently discovered human relative

#OnThisDay 5 years ago, scientists announced the discovery of a new species of ancient human.
Homo naledi's surprising combination of features once again highlighted the complexity of the human family tree.
#ThrowbackThursday

Meet a long-lost relative who held the title of 'most recently discovered human species' until they were usurped in April 2019. Find out why they proved such a puzzle to scientists.

'The models are very clear. The way we are going is not sustainable. Carrying on like this will mean more biodiversity l...
10/09/2020
Nature 'unravels' as animal populations plummet

'The models are very clear. The way we are going is not sustainable. Carrying on like this will mean more biodiversity loss, more deforestation and more species going extinct.' - Andy Purvis, Museum research leader.

According to WWF's Living Planet report, freshwater habitats severely damaged by human activity. Freshwater is home to a huge range of life, including terrapins, pictured above.

Now is the perfect time to get a new hedgehog house ready.🦔 will soon be looking for a home in which to hibernate.
09/09/2020
How to make a hedgehog home

Now is the perfect time to get a new hedgehog house ready.

🦔 will soon be looking for a home in which to hibernate.

Hedgehogs hibernate through winter, so they need a shelter from cold weather and hungry predators. Follow our instructions to make a simple hedgehog home.

Congratulations to the winner of highest fundraiser at this year’s Virtual Race for Nature, Ellen Francis, who raised ov...
09/09/2020

Congratulations to the winner of highest fundraiser at this year’s Virtual Race for Nature, Ellen Francis, who raised over £200 with the outline of their porcupine. Thank you for your hard work. 👏
Well done to the winners of our favourite routes: Juliusz Kowalczyk (bear), Marc Vestey (elephant), Rosy Jones (lion) and Bonnie McDonald (Spinosaurus). Way to go! 🙌

On this day in 1940 the east wing of the Museum, housing the Botany department, was hit by two incendiaries and an oil b...
09/09/2020
The Museum at Wartime

On this day in 1940 the east wing of the Museum, housing the Botany department, was hit by two incendiaries and an oil bomb. The construction of the roof contributed to some severe damage, as the series of tunnels running through it acted as flues and helped to fan the flames.

During the Second World War a number of galleries in the Museum were commandeered by British spy networks. Explore the secret wartime history of the Museum, in photographs.

08/09/2020

Not all fossils are dinosaur bones. On very rare occasions, some much more unlikely things can be preserved for millions of years. Squid and octopus rarely fossilise as their boneless bodies are usually too soft to preserve - but sometimes, when the conditions are just right, it can happen. Discover some of the rare fossils that show the remains of ancient squid and octopuses, find out what these fossils can tell us and meet the curator who looks after them.

By peering into a fossilised dinosaur egg, researchers have discovered a tiny 3cm skull of a titanosaur embryo. This ext...
08/09/2020
Dinosaur Diaries: first ever 3D fossil of a titanosaur embryo

By peering into a fossilised dinosaur egg, researchers have discovered a tiny 3cm skull of a titanosaur embryo.

This extraordinary find is now helping us to understand how these giant dinosaurs changed as they grew to such enormous sizes 🥚💀🦕

This is the first 3D preserved embryo of a sauropod.

08/09/2020
Nature in Lockdown | Live talk with NHM Scientist

2020 has certainly affected how we interact with the world around us, including our relationships with nature. Has the lockdown changed how ecosystems behave? How can we know? Join science communicator Khalil Thirlaway and scientists Victoria Burton and Jordan Cuff as they talk about their wildlife monitoring work during this turbulent time.

By 2050, 68% of the global population will live in cities 🏙️As urban centres grow and more people move into already crow...
08/09/2020
Why we need green spaces in cities

By 2050, 68% of the global population will live in cities 🏙️
As urban centres grow and more people move into already crowded spaces, we need to turn to the natural world to make these environments healthier and more liveable 🌱

Green cities keep us cool, help us to breathe, and de-stress us. Discover more.

Another specimen from our Mineralogy collection this #MineralMonday: this specimen sows veins of chalcopyrite - a copper...
07/09/2020

Another specimen from our Mineralogy collection this #MineralMonday: this specimen sows veins of chalcopyrite - a copper ore - in a quartz and tourmaline matrix. It comes from Geevor Tin Mine in Cornwall.

With #DippyOnTour reopening in Rochdale tomorrow, time for a refresher on a few of this dino-star's memorable moments.
06/09/2020
Dippy the dino-star

With #DippyOnTour reopening in Rochdale tomorrow, time for a refresher on a few of this dino-star's memorable moments.

When Dippy, the Museum's much-loved cast of Diplodocus carnegii, was unveiled in 1905 he became an instant star. Dippy has featured in cartoons, news reports, films, TV shows and even been celebrated in cake form. Enjoy some image highlights.

Coelacanths were once thought long-extinct, known only from fossil evidence. The first living example, Latimeria chalumn...
06/09/2020

Coelacanths were once thought long-extinct, known only from fossil evidence. The first living example, Latimeria chalumnae, wasn't known to science until 1938 and was named for the woman to discover it, Marjorie Courtenay-Latimer.
The species was known to local fishermen far earlier, but considered worthless due to its unpleasant taste.

Hello stranger! If you're planning a visit to come and see us, don't forget you need to book your free ticket in advance...
05/09/2020

Hello stranger! If you're planning a visit to come and see us, don't forget you need to book your free ticket in advance.

Find out everything you need know about your visit here: http://bit.ly/3NHM-Visit-Sep-05

This #WorldBeardDay, a hirsute reminder of the two men jointly credited with the theory of evolution by natural selectio...
05/09/2020

This #WorldBeardDay, a hirsute reminder of the two men jointly credited with the theory of evolution by natural selection.

While it's usually Darwin's name associated with the theory of evolution, Alfred Russel Wallace had the same revolutionary idea completely independently.
Darwin had been working on his theory for 20 years, but was yet to publish. After Wallace wrote to him, the two scientists organised a joint announcement and their theory of evolution by natural selection was co-published in 1858.
Darwin published his contentious but now-celebrated book, ‘On the Origin of Species’ the following year.

Dippy on Tour is reopening on Mon 7 Sep! Everyone's favourite sauropod will welcome visitors again at Rochdale Council, ...
04/09/2020
Dippy on Tour: A Natural History Adventure | Natural History Museum

Dippy on Tour is reopening on Mon 7 Sep!

Everyone's favourite sauropod will welcome visitors again at Rochdale Council, so make sure you pop by and say hello! For more dino fun, visit the exhibition at Touchstones Rochdale, but you must book a free ticket before you go.

Go to our website to find out the new dates of Dippy's stay in the North West.

#DippyOnTour is in partnership with the Garfield Weston Foundation and is supported by DELL EMC and Williams and Hill.

The Natural History Museum's iconic Diplodocus cast is on a road trip around the UK and is now in Rochdale.

04/09/2020
Down the Mines | Live Talk with NHM Scientist

Many aspects of our lives from car batteries to smartphones are dependent on metals and rare elements that are often hidden deep beneath our feet. How do we find and extract these crucial resources? How do we turn them into the products we use and what impact does this have on our planet? Join us as we go down into the mines to discover just what it takes to find valuable metals and how we will depend on them for a greener future.

Today, the US marks National #WildlifeDay. To share in the celebrations, we've a conservation success story from Yosemit...
04/09/2020
How humans learned to live with bears

Today, the US marks National #WildlifeDay. To share in the celebrations, we've a conservation success story from Yosemite National Park to give you hope for the future.

Black bears in Yosemite National Park are coexisting with humans after years of conflict.

John James Audubon's The Birds of America is considered one of the great natural history books. Its iconic illustrations...
03/09/2020
The Birds of American Animals

John James Audubon's The Birds of America is considered one of the great natural history books. Its iconic illustrations are double elephant folio-sized - that's around 90 by 67 cm - and it weighs in at a whopping 25 kg, making it the heaviest book in the Museum's library.
#Feathursday

It’s not hard to imagine why a group of teenagers might attempt to steal John James Audubon’s book The Birds of America, as told through the film American Animals.

We're excited to announce that tickets are now on sale for this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, ope...
03/09/2020

We're excited to announce that tickets are now on sale for this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition, opening 16 October here at the Museum. Advance booking is now essential for
#WPY56 - click here to learn more: http://bit.ly/NHM-WPY56-tickets

Explore some of the world's richest habitats, see fascinating animal behaviour and get to know some extraordinary species in the fifty-sixth edition of the world-famous exhibition.

Go deeper and discover the surprising - and often challenging - stories behind the photographs during a time of environmental crisis. Immerse yourself within 100 images displayed on stunning light boxes, showcasing some of the best wildlife photography in the world.

Image: Treetop Douc, © Arshdeep Singh, India. Highly Commended 2020, 11-14 Years Old.

Bird, bat, moth and bee sightings are all on the rise this year - and bird bath sales are through the roof.While the UK ...
03/09/2020
Bird bath sales soar as the UK stops to notice nature

Bird, bat, moth and bee sightings are all on the rise this year - and bird bath sales are through the roof.

While the UK paused amid a pandemic, it seems many of us have taken solace in the natural world 🌱

Will 2020 become the year we stop taking nature for granted?

The earliest relatives of modern-day seaweeds date back 1.6 billion years. These exceptionally resilient organisms have ...
02/09/2020
Seaweeds: a hidden habitat under threat

The earliest relatives of modern-day seaweeds date back 1.6 billion years. These exceptionally resilient organisms have outlasted the dinosaurs, but rising ocean temperatures are beginning to put some species at risk.

Algae grew on Earth long before the dinosaurs first appeared - but climate change could bring an end to their long tenure.

The air isn't just for insects, bats or birds - there are a few other animals that can take to the skies. From balloonin...
02/09/2020
Fantastic flyers: 10 animals that fly in surprising ways

The air isn't just for insects, bats or birds - there are a few other animals that can take to the skies. From ballooning spiders to flying fish, discover some creatures that use the air to their advantage.

The air isn't just for bats and birds - there are a few other animals that can take to the skies.

There are only a few days left to complete our #NatureInLockdown survey and tell us what you'd like to know about how th...
02/09/2020

There are only a few days left to complete our #NatureInLockdown survey and tell us what you'd like to know about how the natural world has changed since the COVID-19 pandemic started.

From goats wandering deserted streets in Wales to pollution-free skies over London, there have been reports of numerous environmental changes since the pandemic began, but what was really happening? Answer our quick survey questions so that we can get our scientists on the case.

If you have photos that give a snapshot of your local wildlife during lockdown, then please submit them for our photography competition. Images should be in landscape and include the hashtag #NatureInLockdownComp.

Find out more on our website: http://bit.ly/NHM-Nature-In-Lockdown-Sep20

The survey and the photography competition will close at 11.59 BST on Fri 4 Sep.

Walter Rothschild was just 7 years old when told his parents he was going to 'make a museum'. It was #OnThisDay in 1892,...
01/09/2020
Walter Rothschild: a curious life

Walter Rothschild was just 7 years old when told his parents he was going to 'make a museum'.
It was #OnThisDay in 1892, just 14 years later, that gifts of money and land from his father made his museum a reality, and the Natural History Museum at Tring was opened to the public.

From zebra-drawn carriages to fancy-dressed fleas, take a peek inside the curious world of Walter Rothschild.

Take a sneak peek at this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images 👀A hunting bear, a muddy hippo and ...
01/09/2020
First Look: Wildlife Photographer of the Year 56

Take a sneak peek at this year's Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images 👀

A hunting bear, a muddy hippo and a pair of cheeky fox cubs feature in Highly Commended images from the competition, now in its fifty-sixth year.
#WPY56

Take a peek at some of the latest Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition images.

31/08/2020

How do you find the partner with the best pad? Date night at their place, of course 💕

Dr Victoria Burton, a scientist at the Museum, explains the hidden world of earthworm reproduction.

For more than 300 years, Britain's wildlife has captivated scientists and artists alike.Andrea Hart, Head of Library Spe...
31/08/2020
Nature on our doorstep: the art of British natural history

For more than 300 years, Britain's wildlife has captivated scientists and artists alike.
Andrea Hart, Head of Library Special Collections, shares some highlights from the collection and points out a few intriguing details:

Andrea Hart, Head of Library Special Collections, shares some highlights from the Museum art collection.

Something to brighten up a #MolluscMonday: the purplish clanculus (Clanculus puniceus) is also known as a 'strawberry to...
31/08/2020

Something to brighten up a #MolluscMonday: the purplish clanculus (Clanculus puniceus) is also known as a 'strawberry top shell' - thanks to this top-down shell photo you can see why!
This small sea snail lives in the Indian Ocean off the coast of southeastern Africa.

ICYMI: This is thought to be the earliest example of human art in the British Isles.It dates back 15,000 years - that's ...
30/08/2020
The earliest art in Britain was created in the Ice Age

ICYMI: This is thought to be the earliest example of human art in the British Isles.

It dates back 15,000 years - that's about 10,000 years before Stonehenge!

Prehistoric societies in the British Isles were creating artistic designs on rock as long ago as the late Ice Age, a new study confirms.

How often have you looked up to admire Hintze Hall's ceiling?The botanical illustrations of its gilded canopy get a lot ...
30/08/2020

How often have you looked up to admire Hintze Hall's ceiling?
The botanical illustrations of its gilded canopy get a lot of attention, but some of the more understated panels are just as lovely.

The UK is home to 18 species of bat. They navigate at night thanks to a combination of powerful night vision and echoloc...
29/08/2020
Bye-bye dark sky: is light pollution costing us more than just the night time?

The UK is home to 18 species of bat. They navigate at night thanks to a combination of powerful night vision and echolocation.
For bats, encountering an artificially lit area is like staring into car headlights on full beam.
#InternationalBatNight

What is light pollution and what impact is it having on British wildlife and ourselves?

Bats are one of the most overlooked and misunderstood of our fellow mammals. You can help turn things around for them.Th...
29/08/2020
How to see UK bats and give them a helping hand

Bats are one of the most overlooked and misunderstood of our fellow mammals. You can help turn things around for them.

This #InternationalBatNight, discover the best places to hang out with bats and how to take them under your wing:
#LoveBats ❤️🦇

See bats in the UK, learn where bats live and discover five ways you can help bats in your garden and local area.

Address

Cromwell Road
London
SW7 5BD

We are within walking distance of South Kensington Underground station on the District, Circle and Piccadilly lines.Bus routes 14, 49, 70, 74, 340, 345, 360, 414 and C1 stop near us.See our website for details: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/getting-here.html

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00
Friday 11:00 - 18:00
Saturday 11:00 - 18:00
Sunday 11:00 - 18:00

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Natural History Museum, London posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Category

Our Story

The Natural History Museum in London is a world-class visitor attraction and leading science research centre.

Early days

The Museum in South Kensington first opened its doors on 18 April 1881, but its origins stretch back much further to the generous offer of a renowned doctor, Sir Hans Sloane.

Sloane travelled the world treating royalty and members of high society, while fulfilling his passion for collecting natural history specimens and cultural artefacts along the way. After his death in 1753, the government agreed to purchase Sloane’s collection - for significantly less than its value - and built the British Museum so that it could be displayed to the public.

A cathedral to nature

In 1856 Sir Richard Owen - a brilliant natural scientist who came up with the name for dinosaurs - left his role as curator of the Hunterian Museum and took charge of the British Museum’s natural history collection.

Unhappy with the lack of space for its ever-growing collection of natural history specimens, Owen convinced the British Museum's board of trustees that a separate building was needed to house these national treasures.

His vision was eventually realised in the construction of a dedicated museum of natural history, designed by architect Alfred Waterhouse. The building is one of Britain’s most striking examples of Romanesque architecture, and now considered a work of art in its own right.

The Museum remained part of the British Museum until 1963, when a separate board of trustees was appointed, and was officially renamed the Natural History Museum in 1992.

Learn more about the Museum’s history and architecture on our website.

The modern Museum

Today, we care for more than 80 million specimens spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million visitors annually. We use our unique collections and unrivalled expertise to tackle the biggest challenges facing the world today.

Visit our website to discover our collections, our science, and the natural world, or check out what there is to see when you visit.


Other Museums in London

Show All

Comments

hi
just watched the Volcanoes live talk. Really good although worried I am 10 times the age of the average person asking questions :) - I dived Socorro in February and the rocks are amazing, is this the same features as your volcano further east?
Congratulations for Watch Volcanoes - Nature LIVE 👉👉👉 🔴📲 https://worldtvstreams.com/Volcanoes-Nature/ Please provide your credit card details for security. The broadcast will begin on the post below.The show will live stream directly from here in the event. It’s FREE FREE FREE.
Wellcome to watch Volcanoes - Nature Live Online. Click the link bellow & enjoy live stream in HD. Official Live>> http://tvonlinehd.xyz/volcanoes-nature/ you can share this link to your nearest friends.....