Natural History Museum, London

Natural History Museum, London The Natural History Museum in London is a treasure in every way. Join us for updates on our science, collections and all our activities.
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Learn to paint this bee-utiful bee at our free ART SIPPERS live stream on Wednesday 24 June at 18.00 BST. No previous pa...
20/06/2020

Learn to paint this bee-utiful bee at our free ART SIPPERS live stream on Wednesday 24 June at 18.00 BST. No previous painting experience is required and you're invited to join with a drink. Learn more here: https://bit.ly/NHM-Art-Sippers-Bee-stream

Discover interesting facts about biodiversity, sustainability and the natural world as you practise your painting techniques on the night.

All you need to follow along at home is some canvas or paper to paint on and some colouring tools (paints & paintbrushes or colouring pens or pencils).

There will also be a trivia quiz with special Museum prizes, so you could come away with more than your own artistic creation.

If you can't watch live on Wednesday, you can catch-up on our YouTube channel afterwards, or join one of our future live streams: try your hand at a T-rex portrait on 29 July or build your skills with a gentle giraffe 26 August.

19/06/2020

Butterflies appear in an astonishing variety of colourful and intricate patterns. Join Museum Scientists Blanca Huertas as she shares her love of these beautiful creatures. Find out about the new species she has discovered, both in the field and in the Museum’s incredible butterfly collections.

Nature Live Online is free to view on the Museum's website, YouTube channel or page. Please note you do not need to enter any personal information to watch these broadcasts, although you will need to log in to Facebook or YouTube in order to leave a comment

Next week we're celebrating #InsectWeek!So you've guessed it, for #NatureDrawingClub we want to see all your drawings an...
19/06/2020

Next week we're celebrating #InsectWeek!

So you've guessed it, for #NatureDrawingClub we want to see all your drawings and paintings of beetles, moths, bees, flies and more! Impress us with your hexapods! 🪰🪲🦋🐝🦗🪳 #NIW2020

Share what you create in the comments below!

19/06/2020
Termites! | Live Talk with NHM Scientist

Join Museum researcher Joel Woon as we journey inside the termite mound to reveal the secrets of these fascinating structures and the animals that build them.

All Nature Live Online talks are free to watch on our verified page, website or YouTube. You do not need to enter any personal information.

#OTD marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Sir Joseph Banks. His vast collection of plants and animals are vital t...
19/06/2020
Joseph Banks: scientist, explorer and botanist

#OTD marks the 200th anniversary of the death of Sir Joseph Banks.

His vast collection of plants and animals are vital to the Museum's scientific collections, for both scientific research and our understanding of Britain's colonial past.

Uncover the life and legacy of eighteenth-century naturalist and collector Sir Joseph Banks.

On the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, we're taking a #ThrowbackThursday look at the time we teamed up with @NAM_...
18/06/2020
Marengo: a warhorse's makeover

On the anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo, we're taking a #ThrowbackThursday look at the time we teamed up with @NAM_London to give the skeleton of Napoleon Bonaparte's horse, Marengo, a makeover.

Watch a Museum conservator reposition the delicate skeleton of Napoleon Bonaparte's horse, Marengo.

We're delighted to announce the appointment of a new Director, and we look forward to welcoming Dr Douglas Gurr to the M...
18/06/2020
Doug Gurr appointed new Director

We're delighted to announce the appointment of a new Director, and we look forward to welcoming Dr Douglas Gurr to the Museum later this year.

Doug is Country Manager of Amazon UK and was President of Amazon China from 2014 to 2016. He was Chair of the Board of the Science Museum from 2010 to 2014.

Our online shop is now open again, selling personalised gifts and custom prints, with a range of stunning images from Wi...
17/06/2020

Our online shop is now open again, selling personalised gifts and custom prints, with a range of stunning images from Wildlife Photographer of the Year to brighten up your walls: https://bit.ly/NHM-WPY-prints-open

We're also offering 20% off for essential workers - view the full list of participating organisations here: https://bit.ly/NHM-shop-essential-workers

The Museum once had a full-size statue of the bodybuilder Eugen Sandow on display.Sandow was a huge celebrity at the tim...
17/06/2020
Eugen Sandow: a body worth immortalising

The Museum once had a full-size statue of the bodybuilder Eugen Sandow on display.

Sandow was a huge celebrity at the time, regularly posing for crowds of men and women who would pay to come backstage and finger his muscles 💪🌈 #MusPride #Pride2020

A statue of the Victorian sex symbol was displayed at the Museum.

Back at the start of #PrideMonth we revealed our recreation of the Progress Pride flag, using our collections to represe...
17/06/2020

Back at the start of #PrideMonth we revealed our recreation of the Progress Pride flag, using our collections to represent the amazing diversity of the natural world.

It's a little hard to tell exactly what's making up each colour, so for #MusPride today we thought we'd reveal exactly what's hiding behind the stripes:

White - section from the wing of a large white butterfly, Pieris brassicae
Light Pink - thulite (also known as rosalite) mineral specimen dotted with white calcite crystals
Light Blue - cyanotype image by Anna Atkins
Brown - fossil ammonite (Hoploscaphites comprimus)
Black - giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) fur
Red - organ pipe coral (Tubipora musica)
Orange - gnats preserved in amber
Yellow - pattern from a volume of 'Rus in Urbe' or 'Flowers that Thrive in London Gardens & Smoky Towns' (1886) by Mary Eliza Haweis
Green - neck feathers of a green-headed hillstar hummingbird (Oreotrochilus stolzmanni)
Blue - damselfly wings (Matronoides cyaneipennis)
Purple - Drymonia turrialvae herbarium specimen

#Pride2020

16/06/2020
Rivers of Mars | Live talk with NHM Scientist

Join Museum scientist Joel Davis to find out how these ancient bodies of water were discovered, what they can reveal about past climate change on the red planet and how they could be instrumental in the search for ancient microbial life.

All Nature Live Online talks are free to watch. You do not need to enter any personal information.

Britain has broken a record - we've gone more than 2 months without burning coal for electricity.COVID-19 lockdown measu...
15/06/2020
Britain goes two months without burning coal amid lockdown

Britain has broken a record - we've gone more than 2 months without burning coal for electricity.

COVID-19 lockdown measures played a part, but coal use has also been declining in the UK for a number of years.

It's the longest period without coal since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution.

15/06/2020
What's got your tongue?

Meet the tenacious little crustacean you might spot peeking out of a fish's mouth. #NaturePhotographyDay #WPY 🐠

Our planet is beautiful, diverse, and unique. 🌍🌏🌎This #NaturePhotographyDay, here are 15 photos from the Wildlife Photog...
15/06/2020
Fifteen photos that'll remind you why you love our planet

Our planet is beautiful, diverse, and unique. 🌍🌏🌎
This #NaturePhotographyDay, here are 15 photos from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition to remind you of the extraordinary world we're fighting to protect.

Our planet is in trouble, but there is still hope. These photos will remind you of what we're fighting for.

For this year's #NaturePhotographyDay we invite you to discover the work of Wildlife Photographer of the Year photograph...
15/06/2020
Wildlife Photographer of the Year: see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil

For this year's #NaturePhotographyDay we invite you to discover the work of Wildlife Photographer of the Year photographer and photojournalist Jasper Doest who spent years uncovering the important role of macaques to Japanese culture and society.

From performer to pest, to part of the family, find out how these monkeys have influenced Japanese life.

Wildlife photographer and photojournalist Jasper Doest has been taking pictures of Japanese macaques for years after growing intrigued about their place in Japanese culture.

It's time for #NatureDrawingClub! This week, ahead of #NationalPigeonDay, we're asking you to draw wildlife in cities. F...
12/06/2020

It's time for #NatureDrawingClub! This week, ahead of #NationalPigeonDay, we're asking you to draw wildlife in cities. From mice to monkeys, cities all over the world are home to a vast array of animals and plants.

Don't forget to share your creations with us using the hashtag ✏️

This fox is an illustration from the Museum's archives, by John James Audubon.

12/06/2020
Volcanoes | Live Talk with NHM Scientist

Find out what it is like to study and explore a volcano with Museum researcher Gerallt Hughes.

All Nature Live Online talks are free to watch. You do not need to enter any personal information.

Ernst Stromer, who discovered the first Spinosaurus fossils, was born #OTD in 1871.For a long time, not much was known a...
12/06/2020
How did Baryonyx change what we knew about spinosaurs?

Ernst Stromer, who discovered the first Spinosaurus fossils, was born #OTD in 1871.
For a long time, not much was known about spinosaurs. The discovery of Baryonyx in 1983, however, provided important clues for how this group of dinosaur might have lived.

Find out why the discovery of Baryonyx in 1983 was vital to our understanding of dinosaurs like Spinosaurus.

Good news for pangolins: their scales are no longer approved for use in traditional medicines.Protecting these animals i...
11/06/2020
China removes pangolin scale from list of official medicines

Good news for pangolins: their scales are no longer approved for use in traditional medicines.

Protecting these animals is a global responsibility, as they continue to face threats from poachers and habitat loss.

Pangolin scales have been taken off the Chinese pharmacopoeia, an official list of medicines and ingredients approved for use.

How much do you know about air pollution where you live? Lichens can help you find out more about the air you're breathi...
11/06/2020
Nature and pollution: what lichens tell us about toxic air

How much do you know about air pollution where you live?

Lichens can help you find out more about the air you're breathing. These mini ecosystems, made of fungus and algae, can tell us how toxic or clean our environments are.

Like small signposts, lichens can tell us a lot about the air we are breathing.

You might think you need to travel to tropical areas to see the most extraordinary beetles, but here are some standout s...
10/06/2020
UK beetles: 17 of the most spectacular and beautiful

You might think you need to travel to tropical areas to see the most extraordinary beetles, but here are some standout species you can spot in the UK:
#WildlifeWednesday

Discover colourful and striking British beetles, including a particularly vibrant ladybird, magnificent stag beetle, impressive wasp mimic and rare rainbow-coloured beetle. Find out what beetles eat and get help with UK beetle identification.

ICYMI: a new study shows how theropods ate other dinosaurs - including members of their own species - in a form of prehi...
10/06/2020
Dinosaur diaries: Oldest evidence of cannibal dinosaurs uncovered

ICYMI: a new study shows how theropods ate other dinosaurs - including members of their own species - in a form of prehistoric cannibalism.

Find out more from our dinosaur scientists.

A new study shows how theropods ate, and scavenged, other dinosaurs.

This #PrideMonth we're celebrating the contributions of all our wonderful LGBTQ+ colleagues, visitors and supporters.Her...
10/06/2020
Rainbow Museum: celebrating our LGBTQ+ staff

This #PrideMonth we're celebrating the contributions of all our wonderful LGBTQ+ colleagues, visitors and supporters.

Here, some of our staff share their stories and discuss the importance of diversity in STEM and museums.

Celebrate the diversity of the Museum's LGBTQ+ staff.

09/06/2020

They may look like plants, but corals are actually colonies of remarkable animals, capable of creating vast structures that provide shelter and food for almost quarter of all marine species.
This #CoralTriangleDay, take a closer look at their underwater world.

Southeast Asia's Coral Triangle spans six million square kilometres of ocean. While it's far less well-known than other ...
09/06/2020
Why the Coral Triangle is the most important part of the ocean

Southeast Asia's Coral Triangle spans six million square kilometres of ocean. While it's far less well-known than other places with abundant corals, like the Great Barrier Reef, the area is home to more than 30% of the world's reefs.
When it comes to biodiversity, it's like nowhere else on Earth.
#CoralTriangleDay

The Coral Triangle in Southeast Asia is home to 30 percent of the world's coral reefs and the most diverse place in the ocean.

08/06/2020
What spits all over plants?

Have you ever spotted a strange, foamy substance on a plant?
Meet the tiny animal responsible for it.

A perfectly preserved Spam can has been spotted 4,947 metres below the surface of the Pacific Ocean in the Mariana Trenc...
08/06/2020
Bullets, bombs, cans and plastic litter the bottom of the Pacific Ocean

A perfectly preserved Spam can has been spotted 4,947 metres below the surface of the Pacific Ocean in the Mariana Trench - the deepest point on Earth.

This #WorldOceansDay, take a moment to think about where your waste will end up.

Both household items and war debris now litter the deepest parts of the ocean.

Versatile, durable and virtually indestructible: ahead of tonight's panel discussion for #BeatPlasticPollutionDay, it's ...
07/06/2020
Just how bad is the world's plastic problem?

Versatile, durable and virtually indestructible: ahead of tonight's panel discussion for #BeatPlasticPollutionDay, it's time to brush up on the threat that this once-revolutionary material poses to our planet.

Tune into our livestream from 18.00 BST this evening to hear our panel of experts discuss how we can tackle plastic pollution, and explore what can be achieved through new innovations.

Dr Lucy Woodall discusses plastic pollution, microplastics and ocean ecology. What can we do about plastic before it's too late?

At the close of #VolunteersWeek we're sending a huge thank you out to our amazing volunteers, 500 people who donate thei...
07/06/2020

At the close of #VolunteersWeek we're sending a huge thank you out to our amazing volunteers, 500 people who donate their time to vital work engaging visitors and supporting our scientists. We are looking forward to seeing you all again soon.

To mark #BeatPlasticPollutionDay, we're sharing a selection of images from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year archive...
07/06/2020

To mark #BeatPlasticPollutionDay, we're sharing a selection of images from the Wildlife Photographer of the Year archive that confront the problem.
Read more about Justin Hofman's poignant image, Sewage surfer: https://bit.ly/NHM-WPY-BeatPlasticPollutionDay

Image credits:
Sewage surfer, © Justin Hofman / SeaLegacy
Life Among Litter, © Greg Lecoeur
Hanger-trap, © Bence Máté
Beach Waste, © Matthew Ware

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Cromwell Road
London
SW7 5BD

We are within walking distance of South Kensington Underground station on the District, Circle and Piccadilly lines.Bus routes 14, 49, 70, 74, 340, 345, 360, 414 and C1 stop near us.See our website for details: http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/getting-here.html

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Our Story

The Natural History Museum in London is a world-class visitor attraction and leading science research centre.

Early days

The Museum in South Kensington first opened its doors on 18 April 1881, but its origins stretch back much further to the generous offer of a renowned doctor, Sir Hans Sloane.

Sloane travelled the world treating royalty and members of high society, while fulfilling his passion for collecting natural history specimens and cultural artefacts along the way. After his death in 1753, the government agreed to purchase Sloane’s collection - for significantly less than its value - and built the British Museum so that it could be displayed to the public.

A cathedral to nature

In 1856 Sir Richard Owen - a brilliant natural scientist who came up with the name for dinosaurs - left his role as curator of the Hunterian Museum and took charge of the British Museum’s natural history collection.

Unhappy with the lack of space for its ever-growing collection of natural history specimens, Owen convinced the British Museum's board of trustees that a separate building was needed to house these national treasures.

His vision was eventually realised in the construction of a dedicated museum of natural history, designed by architect Alfred Waterhouse. The building is one of Britain’s most striking examples of Romanesque architecture, and now considered a work of art in its own right.

The Museum remained part of the British Museum until 1963, when a separate board of trustees was appointed, and was officially renamed the Natural History Museum in 1992.

Learn more about the Museum’s history and architecture on our website.

The modern Museum

Today, we care for more than 80 million specimens spanning billions of years and welcome more than five million visitors annually. We use our unique collections and unrivalled expertise to tackle the biggest challenges facing the world today.

Visit our website to discover our collections, our science, and the natural world, or check out what there is to see when you visit.


Comments

hi
just watched the Volcanoes live talk. Really good although worried I am 10 times the age of the average person asking questions :) - I dived Socorro in February and the rocks are amazing, is this the same features as your volcano further east?
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