Claudia González Burguete Photography

Claudia González Burguete Photography Claudia González Burguete Photography (CGBP) is a Photographic Gallery. An enterprise of González Burguete Group.

Operating as usual

Photos from Claudia González Burguete Photography's post
12/03/2021

Photos from Claudia González Burguete Photography's post

Photos from GB Images's post
20/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

Photos from GB Images's post
13/09/2020

Photos from GB Images's post

New camera decoration
13/05/2019
Nikon F3 Film SLR Camera

New camera decoration

This is a model of the Nikon F3, which is considered by many to be the best film camera Nikon ever made. For those who aren't familiar with old cameras, the F3 was an SLR camera, SLR standing for single lens reflex. SLR cameras differ from the...

06/04/2019
BG Publishing

BG Publishing

We are currently working on the next BG Image Exhibition Book due next January.

We have prepared a lot of surprises for this year. Happy new year.
01/01/2019

We have prepared a lot of surprises for this year. Happy new year.

Best wishes to all during the holidays.
08/12/2018

Best wishes to all during the holidays.

Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops
18/05/2018
Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops

Light & Land Photographic Tours and Workshops

What does it take to become a best-selling landscape photographer whose work is celebrated all over the world?

You’ve spent years developing your portfolio and now comes the challenge of exhibiting and selling. The purpose of this two-day workshop is to teach aspiring professionals how to curate an exhibition and make the big leap to securing full gallery representation, and achieving their first sales.

This is a rare opportunity to gain an insight into the highly specialised world of art sales from celebrated landscape photographer Charlie Waite Photography and his agent Luke Whitaker, who runs the highly successful Bosham Gallery. As the title suggests this is not just about the making of the photographs, the workshop is focused on the commercial aspects of the business; namely how to run an exhibition and successfully sell your photography.

BG Images's cover photo
24/11/2017

BG Images's cover photo

15/09/2017

Next photographic exhibition will be about Madrid and Toledo both beautiful cities from Spain.

BG Images's cover photo
25/08/2017

BG Images's cover photo

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the...
25/08/2017

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Enlightenment”. The ceremony was directed by Bradley Hemmings and Jenn Sealey and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

• Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public and the display was set awaiting the performance to start.

• The Age of Enlightenment – this section depicted Stephen Hawking (physicist) delivered a memorable speech about the big bang and what followed this.

• Miranda (Science of History, Colour of Science) – this section depicted Miranda whom was the guide of the ceremony was introduce and the journey started from the depth of space, sea navigation and Newton’s apple.

• Spirit in Motion – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The Nations parade is in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a transparent umbrella with the country’s name in English on top and the country’s flag was depicted on the skirt.

• End of Athletes Parade – this section depicted the Great Britain’s team which as the parade always ends with the hosting team.

• Brave New World – this section started with the giant umbrella in the centre of the stadium was lifted and Miranda was on top of book The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And the section ended when Miranda recited the speech from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

• Navigation – this section was a tribute to scientists, mathematicians and astronomers that used their imagination to challenge the boundaries of the known world. The planets were depicted in mobile structures that rotate around the library.

• Gravity – this section was a tribute to Sir Isaac Newton and the garden where he observed the apple dropping. The section ended with all the stadium biting an apple and creating a big crunching sound.

• Enlightenment – this section depicted the lightening of the Paralympic Flame. The cauldron was lighted by Margaret Maughan, Britain’s first gold medallist at the Paralympic Games in 1960.

• I am What I am – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performance was the entire stadium singing “I am what I am”. This song is about empowerment and accepting each person as they are. The section ended with a pyrotechnic display and the entire cast, included volunteers, becoming part of the closing act.

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Enlightenment”. The ceremony was directed by Bradley Hemmings and Jenn Sealey and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

• Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public and the display was set awaiting the performance to start.

• The Age of Enlightenment – this section depicted Stephen Hawking (physicist) delivered a memorable speech about the big bang and what followed this.

• Miranda (Science of History, Colour of Science) – this section depicted Miranda whom was the guide of the ceremony was introduce and the journey started from the depth of space, sea navigation and Newton’s apple.

• Spirit in Motion – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The Nations parade is in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a transparent umbrella with the country’s name in English on top and the country’s flag was depicted on the skirt.

• End of Athletes Parade – this section depicted the Great Britain’s team which as the parade always ends with the hosting team.

• Brave New World – this section started with the giant umbrella in the centre of the stadium was lifted and Miranda was on top of book The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. And the section ended when Miranda recited the speech from Shakespeare’s Tempest.

• Navigation – this section was a tribute to scientists, mathematicians and astronomers that used their imagination to challenge the boundaries of the known world. The planets were depicted in mobile structures that rotate around the library.

• Gravity – this section was a tribute to Sir Isaac Newton and the garden where he observed the apple dropping. The section ended with all the stadium biting an apple and creating a big crunching sound.

• Enlightenment – this section depicted the lightening of the Paralympic Flame. The cauldron was lighted by Margaret Maughan, Britain’s first gold medallist at the Paralympic Games in 1960.

• I am What I am – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performance was the entire stadium singing “I am what I am”. This song is about empowerment and accepting each person as they are. The section ended with a pyrotechnic display and the entire cast, included volunteers, becoming part of the closing act.

BG Images's cover photo
21/04/2017

BG Images's cover photo

BG Images's cover photo
03/01/2017

BG Images's cover photo

In 2016, I chose macros as my photographic project and this depict flowers.  These included:1. Dessert Rose (Adenium obe...
03/01/2017

In 2016, I chose macros as my photographic project and this depict flowers.

These included:

1. Dessert Rose (Adenium obesum) –native of south Sahara and it is an evergreen shrub.

2. Dahlia –native to Mexico and it is related to the sunflower, and daisy.

3. Crown of thorns (Euphorbia Milii) – native to Madagascar and introduced to India by the Jews living there.

4. Pink Carpet (Delosperma Cooperi) – native to South Africa and forms a dense lawn with abundant and long-lasting flowering.

5. Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea) – native to West and South West Europe, Asia, Australasia and North West Africa.

6. Garden Rose (Hybrid tea Rose) – the first rose was created in France in 1867 and it is horticultural classification born by cross-breeding two types of roses and the result exhibits traits of both roses.

7. Hardy Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellenica) – native to Argentina and Chile and it is shrub.

8. Noche Buena (Poinsettia) – native to Mexico originally name is Noche Buena but renamed Poinsettia after a USA Minster to Mexico.

9. Petunia –native to South American and is related to to***co, potatoes and chilli peppers.

10. Allium (Allium Carinatum) – native to the Northern Hemisphere and have a small of onions.

11. Tulip (Tulipa Agenensis) – native to Eurasia and North Africa.

12. Hibiscus or Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus Syriacus) –

In 2016, I chose macros as my photographic project and this depict flowers.

These included:

1. Dessert Rose (Adenium obesum) –native of south Sahara and it is an evergreen shrub.

2. Dahlia –native to Mexico and it is related to the sunflower, and daisy.

3. Crown of thorns (Euphorbia Milii) – native to Madagascar and introduced to India by the Jews living there.

4. Pink Carpet (Delosperma Cooperi) – native to South Africa and forms a dense lawn with abundant and long-lasting flowering.

5. Foxglove (Digitalis Purpurea) – native to West and South West Europe, Asia, Australasia and North West Africa.

6. Garden Rose (Hybrid tea Rose) – the first rose was created in France in 1867 and it is horticultural classification born by cross-breeding two types of roses and the result exhibits traits of both roses.

7. Hardy Fuchsia (Fuchsia magellenica) – native to Argentina and Chile and it is shrub.

8. Noche Buena (Poinsettia) – native to Mexico originally name is Noche Buena but renamed Poinsettia after a USA Minster to Mexico.

9. Petunia –native to South American and is related to to***co, potatoes and chilli peppers.

10. Allium (Allium Carinatum) – native to the Northern Hemisphere and have a small of onions.

11. Tulip (Tulipa Agenensis) – native to Eurasia and North Africa.

12. Hibiscus or Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus Syriacus) –

BG Images's cover photo
23/09/2016

BG Images's cover photo

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the...
26/07/2016

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Isles of Wonder”. The ceremony was directed by Academy Award winner film director Danny Boyle and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

1. Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public. The display was set awaiting the performance to start.

2. Prologue – the performers took their initial positions. The prologue celebrated Britain’s maritime heritage. The audience, with the help of the audience leaders, deployed a blue sheet from top to bottom on both levels of the stadium simulating the sight and the sound of the ocean. The performance started at 20.12.

3. Green and Pleasant Land – this section depicted rural Britain and contained a model village with a replica of Glastonbury Tor (mount) water wheel, live animals and performers playing villagers, football and cricket.

4. Industrial Revolution – this section depicted how early industrialists, dressed in Victorian costumes, arrived in stagecoaches in order to survey the land and confirming the new industrial era for Britain. This was the transformation of the rural economy through the Industrial Revolution.

5. Pandemonium – this section was depicted by loud noises performed by volunteers drumming on inverter buckets and bins led by Eveylin Glennie (Scottish percussionist). This also depicted the advancement from the Victorian era to the 1960 for instance: women’s suffrage movement (vote for woman) and the Beatlemania.

6. Beatlemania (Pandemonium) – this depicted the famous British Band the Beatles with people dressed as they appeared on the cover of their album Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Heath Club Band and balloons depicted the Yellow Submarine, one of their biggest songs.

7. Olympic Rings – the Olympic Rings constituted the finale of the Pandemonium section and the start of the formal proceedings. The five Olympic Rings were joined in the middle of the stage and a fireworks display was performed.

8. Children’s Story (Second to the right, and straight on till morning) – this section celebrated the most famous British Children’s literature, like the name of the section from the beloved Peter Pan. This section also celebrated the National Health Service (NHS) but in particular, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), the biggest children’s hospital in London. The last part of the section depicted a little boy on a sick bed.

9. Abide by me – this section was a tribute to “friends and family of those in the stadium who cannot be here tonight”, including the victims of 2005 London bombings. Abide by me is an anthem sung by Emile Sande (British signer) while a group of dancers performed a contemporary dance.

10. Welcome – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The first country in the parade is always Greece and it ends with the hosting team. The Nations parade in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a sign with the country’s name in English and a child volunteer carrying a copper petal (which was part of the cauldron).

11. Bike a.m. – this section depicted the dove of peace. On this occasion the doves were cyclist dressed with wings, which were lit by LEDs. A single dove rode in the middle of the stadium towards the sky pretending to fly away from the stadium.

12. Welcome to the Games (Let the Games Begin) – this section depicted the formal part of the ceremony where the speeches were delivered. The first speaker was Sebastian Coe, chairman for the LOCOG, welcoming everyone to London and the Games. The next speaker was Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee, thanking London, the volunteers and acknowledging that it was the first time in history that every team had a female athlete. The final speaker was the Queen who declared the Games to be officially open.

13. Last Torchbearers (There is Light that Never Goes out) – this section depicted the lightening of the Olympic Flame. The last torchbearers were young athletes nominated by an Olympian to carry the torch from the entrance of the stadium to the cauldron. The cauldron was never seen before and it was considered as “one of the best-kept secrets of the Opening Ceremony”.

14. Olympic Flame (And in the end) – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performer of the night was Sir Paul McCartney and ended his song with a spectacular display of fireworks.

The Opening Ceremony of London 2012 took place at 21.00 BST on 27th July 2012 at the Olympic Stadium situated inside the Queen Elizabeth II Olympic Park. The show was named “Isles of Wonder”. The ceremony was directed by Academy Award winner film director Danny Boyle and was inaugurated by Queen Elizabeth II.

The message conveyed by the Olympic Games was “inspire a generation” by Lord Sebastian Coe, chairman of the LOCOG (London Organising Committee for the Olympic Games). The ceremony was divided into segments and these included:

1. Pre-Show – this section is when the stadium opened for the public. The display was set awaiting the performance to start.

2. Prologue – the performers took their initial positions. The prologue celebrated Britain’s maritime heritage. The audience, with the help of the audience leaders, deployed a blue sheet from top to bottom on both levels of the stadium simulating the sight and the sound of the ocean. The performance started at 20.12.

3. Green and Pleasant Land – this section depicted rural Britain and contained a model village with a replica of Glastonbury Tor (mount) water wheel, live animals and performers playing villagers, football and cricket.

4. Industrial Revolution – this section depicted how early industrialists, dressed in Victorian costumes, arrived in stagecoaches in order to survey the land and confirming the new industrial era for Britain. This was the transformation of the rural economy through the Industrial Revolution.

5. Pandemonium – this section was depicted by loud noises performed by volunteers drumming on inverter buckets and bins led by Eveylin Glennie (Scottish percussionist). This also depicted the advancement from the Victorian era to the 1960 for instance: women’s suffrage movement (vote for woman) and the Beatlemania.

6. Beatlemania (Pandemonium) – this depicted the famous British Band the Beatles with people dressed as they appeared on the cover of their album Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Heath Club Band and balloons depicted the Yellow Submarine, one of their biggest songs.

7. Olympic Rings – the Olympic Rings constituted the finale of the Pandemonium section and the start of the formal proceedings. The five Olympic Rings were joined in the middle of the stage and a fireworks display was performed.

8. Children’s Story (Second to the right, and straight on till morning) – this section celebrated the most famous British Children’s literature, like the name of the section from the beloved Peter Pan. This section also celebrated the National Health Service (NHS) but in particular, Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH), the biggest children’s hospital in London. The last part of the section depicted a little boy on a sick bed.

9. Abide by me – this section was a tribute to “friends and family of those in the stadium who cannot be here tonight”, including the victims of 2005 London bombings. Abide by me is an anthem sung by Emile Sande (British signer) while a group of dancers performed a contemporary dance.

10. Welcome – this section depicted the parade of the athletes. The first country in the parade is always Greece and it ends with the hosting team. The Nations parade in alphabetical order in the native language of the hosting country (or French). Each flag bearer was accompanied by a young woman carrying a sign with the country’s name in English and a child volunteer carrying a copper petal (which was part of the cauldron).

11. Bike a.m. – this section depicted the dove of peace. On this occasion the doves were cyclist dressed with wings, which were lit by LEDs. A single dove rode in the middle of the stadium towards the sky pretending to fly away from the stadium.

12. Welcome to the Games (Let the Games Begin) – this section depicted the formal part of the ceremony where the speeches were delivered. The first speaker was Sebastian Coe, chairman for the LOCOG, welcoming everyone to London and the Games. The next speaker was Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee, thanking London, the volunteers and acknowledging that it was the first time in history that every team had a female athlete. The final speaker was the Queen who declared the Games to be officially open.

13. Last Torchbearers (There is Light that Never Goes out) – this section depicted the lightening of the Olympic Flame. The last torchbearers were young athletes nominated by an Olympian to carry the torch from the entrance of the stadium to the cauldron. The cauldron was never seen before and it was considered as “one of the best-kept secrets of the Opening Ceremony”.

14. Olympic Flame (And in the end) – this section depicted the culmination of the opening ceremony. The last performer of the night was Sir Paul McCartney and ended his song with a spectacular display of fireworks.

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