Mckenzie Heritage

Mckenzie Heritage The mckenzie heritage collection is an exclusive & extensive collection of images, engravings and audio recordings documenting black communities worldwide.
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A contemporary art review, from The New York Times on Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Br...
04/09/2020
ART REVIEW; This Realm of Newcomers, This England

A contemporary art review, from The New York Times on Transforming the Crown: African, Asian and Caribbean Artists in Britain,1966 - 1996, exhibition, 1997. Held over three sites, The Bronx Museum of the Arts Caribbean Cultural Center African Diaspora Institute The Studio Museum in Harlem curated by
Mora J. Beauchamp-Byrd, bringing together 58 artists and over 130 works.

Holland Cotter reviews works by 51 African, Asian and Caribbean artists in Britain; photos; exhibition is divided between Studio Museum in Harlem, Bronx Museum and Caribbean Cultural Center (M)

Online event
04/09/2020
Online event

Online event

In this three-part series, leading African-American scholars explore the long history of racial inequality in the US. Join Professor Megan Ming Francis and Professor Desmond King FBA for part one.

“Amrita Sher-Gil was a Hungarian-Indian painter. She has been called "one of the greatest avant-garde women artists of t...
30/08/2020

“Amrita Sher-Gil was a Hungarian-Indian painter. She has been called "one of the greatest avant-garde women artists of the early 20th century" and a "pioneer" in modern Indian art.

Born in Budapest in 1913, to a Hungarian mother and Sikh father, she trained at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris where she became influenced by Realism. Upon returning to India, she adopted this modernist approach to portray the poor and yet colourful lives of local people, making her art a true fusion of east and west.

She painted women going to the market, women at a wedding, women at home. Sometimes she showed women bonding with other women. At times the works seemed to convey a sense of silent resolve. It was a rendering rarely seen in depictions of Indian women at the time, when portrayals tended to cast them as happy and obedient.

With her style and her emphasis on women, Sher-Gil became known as the “Indian Frida Kahlo.””

History Daily
27/08/2020

History Daily

A member of the Harlem Hellfighters (369th Infantry Regiment) poses for the camera while holding a puppy he saved during World War 1, 1918.

“In the summer of 1962, as a young photographer, Grey witnessed an important moment in the emergence of Britain’s multic...
27/08/2020
Collection Spotlight: Howard Grey Photography

“In the summer of 1962, as a young photographer, Grey witnessed an important moment in the emergence of Britain’s multicultural society. He shot one roll of high contrast black and white film using only natural light, photographing a diverse constituency of migrants at the end of a long journey. The portfolio charts the arrival of the last West Indian migrants at Waterloo Station, London, before the Commonwealth Immigrants Act of 1962 came into force. After over half a century in oblivion, these historic 'Windrush' negatives, were expertly scanned and published online to critical acclaim in 2014.”

https://www.bridgemanimages.co.uk/en/12629/collection-spotlight-howard-grey-photography

Photographer Howard Grey was at Waterloo station when the last of the immigrants who would become known as the Windrush Generation were arriving.

Jan Blake is one of Britainís outstanding female storytellers, performing in theatres and festivals the length and bread...
20/08/2020
Jan Blake – Storyteller and Performer

Jan Blake is one of Britainís outstanding female storytellers, performing in theatres and festivals the length and breadth of Europe. She was born in Manchester to Jamaican parents. Inspired by recordings of 'Miss Lou' (Louise Bennett) she came to telling stories in 1986. She rapidly gained an international reputation for witty and exhilarating performances. She has a powerful singing voice and can seize any stage.Specialising in folktales from West Africa, North Africa, the Arab world and the Caribbean, her repertoire is full of tales of powerful women and her versions of Ananseís exploits are definitive. She is closely involved with projects that will develop a new generation of British storytellers of African and Caribbean descent. www.janblakestories.co.uk

For information about Storyteller, call us today! Storyteller and Performer

https://www-standard-co-uk.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.standard.co.uk/insider/living/misan-harriman-is-spreading-his-opti...
15/08/2020
Misan Harriman: 'I find myself standing in a moment of history'

https://www-standard-co-uk.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.standard.co.uk/insider/living/misan-harriman-is-spreading-his-optimistic-outlook-around-the-world-one-picture-at-a-time-a4524166.html?amp

Misan Harriman is spreading his optimistic outlook around the world one picture at a time. The photographer, who was born in Nigeria, is the first black man to shoot a cover of UK Vogue in the magazine’s history and his pictures have gone viral.

Trinidadian-American Civil Rights activist Stokely Carmichael (later known as Kwame Ture, 1941-1998) speaks at City Coll...
03/08/2020

Trinidadian-American Civil Rights activist Stokely Carmichael (later known as Kwame Ture, 1941-1998) speaks at City College of New York on December 3, 1968.

MA Black British Writing
29/07/2020
MA Black British Writing

MA Black British Writing

The MA Black British Writing at Goldsmiths, University of London explores the history of black British literature through a range of perspectives.

TextileArtist.org
20/07/2020

TextileArtist.org

Life-sized head-to-toe portraits with a single needle and single ply of yarn don’t just happen. According to Ruth Miller, they take at least a year to create.

Prepare to be amazed by Ruth’s incredible stitched narratives with this insider’s look into her philosophy and technique.

http://www.textileartist.org/ruth-miller-life-sized-storytelling-in-stitch

The Battle of Bamber Bridge Black troops were welcome in Britain, but Jim Crow wasn’t: the race riot of one night in Jun...
19/07/2020

The Battle of Bamber Bridge

Black troops were welcome in Britain, but Jim Crow wasn’t: the race riot of one night in June 1943, when black American troops stationed in the town faced off against white US Army military police on the night of June 24-25, 1943.

“US soldiers transferred to Britain in 1942 were given a pamphlet published by the United States War Department.

It was entitled 'Instructions for American Servicemen in Britain.' Many servicemen in the US had never left the states and the guide was supposed to help those men settle in the UK.

the intrinsic racism in a segregated army led to confrontations. This was especially the case in a foreign setting where the black soldiers saw around them a very different reality from that they faced at home – a non-segregated society where they were welcomed as fellow fighters against fascism, rather than tolerated hod-carriers for the war effort as they were generally treated by the US Army.

That evening in 1943, black troops and white locals were stretching out “drinking-up time” in a pub at the end of the evening. Words were exchanged, and military police arrived and tried to arrest Private Eugene Nunn for not wearing the proper uniform. But they faced new solidarities: a white British soldier challenged the military police: “Why do you want to arrest them? They’re not doing anything or bothering anybody.

The incident escalated into a fist fight and the military police were beaten back. When they returned with reinforcements to meet the group, now returning to camp, a battle developed in the street. Shots were fired, and Crossland died with a bullet in his back.

When rumours spread at the camp that black GIs had been shot, scores of men formed a crowd, some carrying rifles. The arrival at around midnight of more military police with a machine gun-equipped vehicle convinced many of the black soldiers that the police intended to kill them – and they drew rifles from the stores. Some barricaded themselves into the base, others tore off back into town, leading to running shooting battles in the streets.

At around the same time, news was filtering through of race riots in Detroit on June 20, where defenceless black men were attacked by racist police, responsible for the deaths of 17 of the 25 African-Americans killed.

The black American servicemen were welcomed into the leisure time of their British hosts in ways that spread solidarity. A former black GI, Cleother Hathcock, remembers:

At that time the Jitterbug was in and the blacks would get a buggin’ and the English just loved that. We would go into a dance hall and just take over the place because everybody wanted to learn how to do that American dance, the Jitterbug. They went wild over that.

The town did not share the US Army’s segregationist attitudes. According to the author Anthony Burgess, who spent time in Bamber Bridge during the war, when US military authorities demanded that the town’s pubs impose a colour bar, the landlords responded with signs that read: “Black Troops Only”. The extent to which this rankled the white American troops is shown by the comments of a lieutenant:

One thing I noticed here and which I don’t like is the fact that the English don’t draw any color line. The English must be pretty ignorant. I can’t see how a white girl could associate with a negro.

This sort of attitude exemplifies the particular resentment over the way black troops openly fraternised with white British women – and many of the confrontations during this period were sparked by the ease of interracial relationships in a British rather than American context.”

Alan Rice is the author of:
Creating Memorials, Building Identities: The Politics of Memory in the Black Atlantic

https://theconversation.com/black-troops-were-welcome-in-britain-but-jim-crow-wasnt-the-race-riot-of-one-night-in-june-1943-98120

Looted African Artefacts in European museums19 JULYONLINE EVENTStolen items from ancient African civilisations are in nu...
12/07/2020
Looted African Artefacts in European museums

Looted African Artefacts in European museums

19 JULY

ONLINE EVENT

Stolen items from ancient African civilisations are in numerous European museums. This talk locates, identifies and explain some of them

bit.ly/lootafart

Stolen items from ancient African civilisations are in numerous European museums. This talk locates, identifies and explain some of them

INDIAN “PHOTOGRAPHER PRINCE” HIS HAREM PHOTOS FROM OVER 150 YEARS AGO Maharaja of Jaipur, Ram Singh II was famous for ma...
11/07/2020
This Indian "Photographer Prince" made his harem pose for photos over 150 years ago - DIY Photography

INDIAN “PHOTOGRAPHER PRINCE” HIS HAREM PHOTOS FROM OVER 150 YEARS AGO

Maharaja of Jaipur, Ram Singh II was famous for many things. It was during his reign that slavery, infanticide and other cruel customs were abolished. He was, however, also known for being an avid photographer.

He could see the value of photography years before many people had even heard of it. In this collection of glass negatives, shot between 1857 and 1865, there is a unique insight into the people he spent his days with. It’s a fascinating look at the culture of the day.

https://www.diyphotography.net/indian-photographer-prince-made-harem-pose-photos-150-years-ago/

As the Maharaja of Jaipur, Ram Singh II was famous for many things. It was during his reign that slavery, infanticide and other cruel customs were abolished. He was, however, also known for being a rather avid photographer. He could see the value of photography years before many people had even hear...

The Source Magazine
11/07/2020

The Source Magazine

Meet Anna Murray Douglass, first wife to Frederick Douglass. Anna helped Frederick escape enslavement. Anna was the first of her siblings to be born free after her parents were manumitted. When she met Frederick she was financially prepared to start a life with him but first, he needed freedom. By borrowing a freedman’s protection certificate from a friend and wearing the disguise of a sailor sewn by Anna, Frederick made his way to New York City by train, spending Anna’s money to buy the ticket. She continued to support his abolitionist work for the rest of her life. There is no Frederick Douglass without Anna Murray Douglass. Protect Black women at all costs. 💯 #AnnaMurrayDouglass #BLM #BlackLivesMatter #AllBlackLivesMatter #WeGotUS #SourceLove #HomeofHipHop

Powerful work
10/07/2020

Powerful work

James C. Lewis, an international photographer. “I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that ...
01/07/2020
Icons Of The Bible - Art

James C. Lewis, an international photographer.

“I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real...”

See the entire “Icons of the Bible” series here: https://www.pinterest.com/rawnoire/icons-of-the-bible/

EDIT: Some have asked if these pictures can be acquired. Here is a link to James Lewis’ art and apparel website. https://fineartamerica.com/profiles/2-cornelius-lewis

Shop for artwork by Icons Of The Bible. Purchase canvas prints, framed prints, tapestries, posters, greeting cards, and more. Coming soon...

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Mckenzie Heritage Pictures (and Picture Archive)

“If we stand tall it is because we stand on the shoulders of many ancestors.” —African Proverb. At Mckenzie Heritage (MH) we dig images big time, thats what its all about. Preserving the past and celebrating the present through the visual. Started in 1996 by Anita J McKenzie, a photographer and image collector. It was the first of its kind, a Black-owned commercial picture library and archive, with a collection of historic and contemporary images in the form of engravings, lithographs, postcards, ephemera and photographs. The collection has been utilised by publishers across print, art, news and journalistic and other visual media industries. Supported with the expertise of a diverse advisory board, which included Mora Beauchamp-Byrd, Len Garrison, William March, Conrad Taylor... In 2004 Mckenzie Heritage published ‘Contrasts, Textures and Hues – Exploring early printed images of people of African and Asian heritage’

This neat book features a collection of selected woodcuts, engravings and lithograph images depicting African and Indian heritage people which were circulated in western magazines and books of the 18th and 19th centuries.

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