Hidden History

Hidden History Hidden History is a new way for you to engage with the past through turning the streets you walk along into the museum you never knew existed!
(9)

Hidden History turns the streets you walk along into the museum you never knew existed! We combine original historical research and GPS technology to provide a unique way for you to explore the History of the United Kingdom (UK). Our dedicated team of historians, research each location and topic to uncover the real history behind the landmarks, locations and events that have shaped the world we li

Hidden History turns the streets you walk along into the museum you never knew existed! We combine original historical research and GPS technology to provide a unique way for you to explore the History of the United Kingdom (UK). Our dedicated team of historians, research each location and topic to uncover the real history behind the landmarks, locations and events that have shaped the world we li

Operating as usual

It never stop to amaze me what you can find in the UK! This is a scale model of the Mohne Dam used by Barnes Wallis to t...
25/04/2021

It never stop to amaze me what you can find in the UK! This is a scale model of the Mohne Dam used by Barnes Wallis to test the ideas behind 'upkeep' (the bouncing bomb), which led onto the famous Dambusters Raid.

Finding these types of sights is kinda special. It connects you with the past in a way a book or tv show never can. At this sight there is something quite special to highlight....The blast damage to the model. This happened during the testing and showstheeffect of the explosives on the Dam.The pictures show the before & after of the testing. It must have been a huge moment for entire team as they saw the idea work.

Its in the most unlikely of places...Watford. At the back of a new estate in some small woods. You can park up round the corner and walk to it in about 10 mins. Well worth a trip for all #ww2 fanatics!

London looking stunning this morning!. 1st day back exploring the city today as we start to preparing for the next set o...
18/04/2021

London looking stunning this morning!.

1st day back exploring the city today as we start to preparing for the next set of tours for the HH app. We will be covering Soho, Covent Garden and Trafalgar Square. Hopefully the Royal Parks as well. Still lots to do but its awesome to be able to get back to this after a long break.

#londonhistory #london #soholondon #trafalgarsquare #history #visitlondon

09/04/2021

A small tribute to Prince Philip.... This is one story from his military service in WW2 that an old friend brought to my attention back when Prince Philip retired. I hope you enjoy it and raise a glass to the Prince.

In July 1943, at the height of the Allied landings in Sicily during World War Two, HMS WALLACE came under sustained bombardment in the dead of night and its crew realised that they would probably lose their lives.

Onboard the ship was Prince Philip who was a First Lieutenant and he came up with the ingenious plan to use one of the wooden rafts to divert the bombers. The raft was thrown overboard and smoke bombs where used to help create the illusion of a burning ship.

The Captain ordered HMS WALLACE to move away from the raft and then ordered "all stop". The tell-tale wake subsided and the ship lay quietly in the soft darkness.

The sound of the aircraft grew louder until the next thing was the scream of falling bombs, but at some distance. As Prince Philip had hoped, the German plane was fooled into attacking the burning raft while HMS WALLACE sailed to safety under cover of darkness, saving the ship and her crew.

"I thought it was a frightfully good wheeze," he later said.

Prince Philip’s war record:

WW2

Battle of Crete
Battle of Cape Matapan
Allied invasion of Sicily
Operation Dragoon
Operation Robson
Operation Lentil
Battle of Okinawa

Awards

Mentioned in Dispatches (MiD)
Croix de Guerre with Palm
Greek War Cross

#PrincePhilip #history #ww2

Happy Mother's Day to humanity's grandmother, 'Mitochondrial Eve'! Living some time 140–200,000 years ago, she's the mos...
22/03/2021

Happy Mother's Day to humanity's grandmother, 'Mitochondrial Eve'! Living some time 140–200,000 years ago, she's the most recent woman from which all people on the planet descend. This date is calculated from mtDNA, which mutates at a fixed rate and passes from mother to child.

Happy Mother's Day to humanity's grandmother, 'Mitochondrial Eve'! Living some time 140–200,000 years ago, she's the most recent woman from which all people on the planet descend. This date is calculated from mtDNA, which mutates at a fixed rate and passes from mother to child.

Ladies, if he:- loves breeding ducks- loves designing trains and loves naming them after ducks- gets a knighthood for hi...
06/03/2021

Ladies, if he:

- loves breeding ducks
- loves designing trains and loves naming them after ducks
- gets a knighthood for his duck trains

He's not your man. He's Sir Nigel Gresley and he's got a cracking statue at King's Cross Station in London 🚂

Check it out:- https://zcu.io/nrvr

Ladies, if he:

- loves breeding ducks
- loves designing trains and loves naming them after ducks
- gets a knighthood for his duck trains

He's not your man. He's Sir Nigel Gresley and he's got a cracking statue at King's Cross Station in London 🚂

Check it out:- https://zcu.io/nrvr

History can be hidden in modern place names of town, villages or cities! For example, in Anglo Saxon England, Wīcs were ...
27/02/2021

History can be hidden in modern place names of town, villages or cities!

For example, in Anglo Saxon England, Wīcs were trading towns. Often coastal, these centres that formed part of a growing trade network in post-Roman Europe.

As well as archaeological evidence, these Wīcs can be seen in the placenames of modern towns with the suffix '-wich'. Places such as Norwich, Ipswich, Hamwic (Southampton) or Jorvik (York) grew from these beginnings, but there are many more! Look out for Wīcs near you!

History can be hidden in modern place names of town, villages or cities!

For example, in Anglo Saxon England, Wīcs were trading towns. Often coastal, these centres that formed part of a growing trade network in post-Roman Europe.

As well as archaeological evidence, these Wīcs can be seen in the placenames of modern towns with the suffix '-wich'. Places such as Norwich, Ipswich, Hamwic (Southampton) or Jorvik (York) grew from these beginnings, but there are many more! Look out for Wīcs near you!

This is an actual Imperial French Eagle! It belonged to the 82nd French Regiment and was taken by the Royal Welch Fusili...
24/02/2021

This is an actual Imperial French Eagle! It belonged to the 82nd French Regiment and was taken by the Royal Welch Fusiliers (RWF) during the capture of Martinique on the 24th February 1809.

Five Imperial Eagles, in total where captured during the campaign that made Sir Arthur Wellesley a household name. Three of these eagles are on display in the UK.

And of course my fascination with them started the 1st time I watched - Sharps Eagle!

The Imperial Eagle standard was created to create pride and loyalty in the backbone of the French army. Each standard was touched by Napoleon during a special ceremony on the 5th December 1804. Napoleon gave a powerful emotive speech that stipulated that the Eagles were to be defended to the last man. Meaning that to capture an Eagle was an incredible feet. Its unclear exactly how many in total where captured but the figure is somewhere between 20 and 13.

Three Eagles from the Martinique campaign can be found at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, the Royal Welch Fusiliers Museum in Caernarvon North Wales (where this picture was taken) and the Royal Fusiliers Museum at the Tower of London.

#Onthisday #history

This is an actual Imperial French Eagle! It belonged to the 82nd French Regiment and was taken by the Royal Welch Fusiliers (RWF) during the capture of Martinique on the 24th February 1809.

Five Imperial Eagles, in total where captured during the campaign that made Sir Arthur Wellesley a household name. Three of these eagles are on display in the UK.

And of course my fascination with them started the 1st time I watched - Sharps Eagle!

The Imperial Eagle standard was created to create pride and loyalty in the backbone of the French army. Each standard was touched by Napoleon during a special ceremony on the 5th December 1804. Napoleon gave a powerful emotive speech that stipulated that the Eagles were to be defended to the last man. Meaning that to capture an Eagle was an incredible feet. Its unclear exactly how many in total where captured but the figure is somewhere between 20 and 13.

Three Eagles from the Martinique campaign can be found at the Royal Hospital Chelsea, the Royal Welch Fusiliers Museum in Caernarvon North Wales (where this picture was taken) and the Royal Fusiliers Museum at the Tower of London.

#Onthisday #history

On the 16th February 1923, Howard Carter enters the sealed burial chamber of King Tutankhamen. Carter had arrived in Egy...
16/02/2021

On the 16th February 1923, Howard Carter enters the sealed burial chamber of King Tutankhamen.

Carter had arrived in Egypt in 1891 at a time when archaeologists from all over the world where searching for evidence of the Egyptian dynasty. Many tombs where found but all had been broken into and robbed. Despite this Carter was convinced that there must be at least one tomb left that had not been broken into and started searching. And nearly over ten years later he was proven right when in November 1922 found a set of steps leading to a new tomb while clearing away the entrance to another tomb. On the 26th November, Carter & Lord Carnarvon (his finical backer) entered the interior chambers and realised that King Tutankhamen tomb had not been broken into.

Three months later and after 3,000 years since it was sealed the tomb is opened to reveal once the greatest treasures of all time. The description of this monumental moment is best left to Carter….

“There before us lay the sealed door, and with its opening, we were to blot out the centuries and stand in the presence of a king who had reigned 3,000 years ago. My own feelings as I mounted the platform were a strange mixture, and with trembling hand I struck the first blow….We were astonished by the beauty and refinement of the art displayed by the objects surpassing all we could have imagined – the impression was overwhelming.”

On the 16th February 1923, Howard Carter enters the sealed burial chamber of King Tutankhamen.

Carter had arrived in Egypt in 1891 at a time when archaeologists from all over the world where searching for evidence of the Egyptian dynasty. Many tombs where found but all had been broken into and robbed. Despite this Carter was convinced that there must be at least one tomb left that had not been broken into and started searching. And nearly over ten years later he was proven right when in November 1922 found a set of steps leading to a new tomb while clearing away the entrance to another tomb. On the 26th November, Carter & Lord Carnarvon (his finical backer) entered the interior chambers and realised that King Tutankhamen tomb had not been broken into.

Three months later and after 3,000 years since it was sealed the tomb is opened to reveal once the greatest treasures of all time. The description of this monumental moment is best left to Carter….

“There before us lay the sealed door, and with its opening, we were to blot out the centuries and stand in the presence of a king who had reigned 3,000 years ago. My own feelings as I mounted the platform were a strange mixture, and with trembling hand I struck the first blow….We were astonished by the beauty and refinement of the art displayed by the objects surpassing all we could have imagined – the impression was overwhelming.”

Colchester (Roman Camulodunum) is the oldest recorded town in Britain, once serving as its Roman capital. Within its imp...
13/02/2021

Colchester (Roman Camulodunum) is the oldest recorded town in Britain, once serving as its Roman capital. Within its impressive walls, it housed three theatres, the only chariot racing circus on the island, bath houses, temples and so much more. It was a real slice of Rome in Britain.

In 60AD, Boudicca began her rebellion here in defiance of Roman occupation and interference with her position as Queen of the Iceni. Along with her Briton army, Boudicca burned the town to the ground, massacring its inhabitants. When archaeologists look at the stratigraphy across the city, 60AD is marked by a thick black destruction layer, often referred to as the Boudicca layer, such was the level of her destruction. However, so many elements of the ancient town remain and can be explored today.

Learn more at Visit Colchester and explore the town: https://zcu.io/uKgM and this is a YouTube video all about the Roman Circus in Colchester the only one ever found in the UK: https://zcu.io/Znhq

Colchester (Roman Camulodunum) is the oldest recorded town in Britain, once serving as its Roman capital. Within its impressive walls, it housed three theatres, the only chariot racing circus on the island, bath houses, temples and so much more. It was a real slice of Rome in Britain.

In 60AD, Boudicca began her rebellion here in defiance of Roman occupation and interference with her position as Queen of the Iceni. Along with her Briton army, Boudicca burned the town to the ground, massacring its inhabitants. When archaeologists look at the stratigraphy across the city, 60AD is marked by a thick black destruction layer, often referred to as the Boudicca layer, such was the level of her destruction. However, so many elements of the ancient town remain and can be explored today.

Learn more at Visit Colchester and explore the town: https://zcu.io/uKgM and this is a YouTube video all about the Roman Circus in Colchester the only one ever found in the UK: https://zcu.io/Znhq

One of my (Kieran) historical hobbies is collecting out of print books about the 2nd world war that where written either...
09/02/2021

One of my (Kieran) historical hobbies is collecting out of print books about the 2nd world war that where written either during or shortly after the war by the people who were there. You can’t beat the detail, the stories and the insights they offer. The other bonus is that they are usually cheap to find in any 2nd hand-book shop. Just look for the really old and battered ones that everyone else is ignoring!

These are some photos from a comically inspired moral boosting book from 1944 about the Chindits and Burma called “Jungle, Jungle, Little Chindits”. Written by two serving Chindits Major Patrick Boyle (The Cameronian (Scottish Rifles)) & Major Jon Musgrave-wood (The Burma Rifles). The book is a mixture of textual description and cartoon sketches and provides an fascinating glimpse into day-to-day life of those that fought in Burma.

The war in Burma was largely forgotten, despite the 14th Army being the largest army ever formed, but thanks to the VJ celebrations & the support for Capt Sir Tom Moore (a 14th Army Veteran) its role in helping the allies beat the Japanese is better understood. However, it’s still the case that a huge amount of focus has been placed on the US and their Island hoping campaign but on their left flank a horrendously fierce fight was being fought in Burma.

The book opens with an emotional and humours tribute to the Chindits from the two authors.... “This book is dedicated to all the Chindits, not only to those who are able to see the benefits reaped by their efforts but especially to those who will for ever patrol the Jungles of Burma in ghostly silence… One particular remark made by a Chindit gave us the general theme of this book; a remark both amusing and profound in its elucidation – “well, all this ruddy Chindit training seems screwy to me, but if it’ll win the ------ war let’s ‘ave a do!”

#history #Worldwar2

One of my (Kieran) historical hobbies is collecting out of print books about the 2nd world war that where written either during or shortly after the war by the people who were there. You can’t beat the detail, the stories and the insights they offer. The other bonus is that they are usually cheap to find in any 2nd hand-book shop. Just look for the really old and battered ones that everyone else is ignoring!

These are some photos from a comically inspired moral boosting book from 1944 about the Chindits and Burma called “Jungle, Jungle, Little Chindits”. Written by two serving Chindits Major Patrick Boyle (The Cameronian (Scottish Rifles)) & Major Jon Musgrave-wood (The Burma Rifles). The book is a mixture of textual description and cartoon sketches and provides an fascinating glimpse into day-to-day life of those that fought in Burma.

The war in Burma was largely forgotten, despite the 14th Army being the largest army ever formed, but thanks to the VJ celebrations & the support for Capt Sir Tom Moore (a 14th Army Veteran) its role in helping the allies beat the Japanese is better understood. However, it’s still the case that a huge amount of focus has been placed on the US and their Island hoping campaign but on their left flank a horrendously fierce fight was being fought in Burma.

The book opens with an emotional and humours tribute to the Chindits from the two authors.... “This book is dedicated to all the Chindits, not only to those who are able to see the benefits reaped by their efforts but especially to those who will for ever patrol the Jungles of Burma in ghostly silence… One particular remark made by a Chindit gave us the general theme of this book; a remark both amusing and profound in its elucidation – “well, all this ruddy Chindit training seems screwy to me, but if it’ll win the ------ war let’s ‘ave a do!”

#history #Worldwar2

On the 7th February 1991, the IRA carried out one of their most ambitious attacks in London. The objective was to assass...
08/02/2021

On the 7th February 1991, the IRA carried out one of their most ambitious attacks in London. The objective was to assassinate the UK Cabinet who were meeting in 10 Downing Street to discuss the developing conflict in the Gulf.

The plan was to fit a white transit van out with three homemade mortars and fire them into the government buildings. The planned failed but four people were injured and for many it signified the peak of IRA’s bombing campaign in London.

You can read all about the attck on the HH app and Website here – https://zcu.io/ATvQ

And the news report from that day is an incredible piece of history - https://zcu.io/I6Wx

On the 7th February 1991, the IRA carried out one of their most ambitious attacks in London. The objective was to assassinate the UK Cabinet who were meeting in 10 Downing Street to discuss the developing conflict in the Gulf.

The plan was to fit a white transit van out with three homemade mortars and fire them into the government buildings. The planned failed but four people were injured and for many it signified the peak of IRA’s bombing campaign in London.

You can read all about the attck on the HH app and Website here – https://zcu.io/ATvQ

And the news report from that day is an incredible piece of history - https://zcu.io/I6Wx

Address

London

Telephone

+447943878999

Products

The Hidden History mobile app is available on both Android and Apple devices.

On the App you will find...

1. Original content thats been written by our team of dedicated historians who provide you with the real story.

2. Free to access in-depth articles on key historical events such as the Suffragette movement, Jack the Ripper, the IRA’s bombing campaign, The Krays, London’s Plague pits & the Windrush Generation.

3. Three preimum audio walking tours covering Jack The Ripper, The Great Fire of London and Shopping, Style and Suffrage that enable you to independently explore London.

4. Interactive GPS map to help you find over 200 individual historical locations.

5. Museums to visit with reviews and visitor information from across London including Freemasons Hall, the National Army Museum, and the Museum of London.

6. Available in London, Edinburgh, Liverpool & York alongside another 60 sites outside of the major cities.

7. Public toilets are available in London and will be added to the other cities as we expand.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Hidden History posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Hidden History:

Videos

Category

Hidden History

Hidden History is a mobile app that turns the streets you walk along into the museum you never knew existed.

Hidden History uses technology, design and creativity to tell historically meaningful stories in a factual, dynamic and engaging manner. We believe that by enabling everyone to form a connection with the events, the places and the people impacted by those events we can play a small part in helping protect the future.

We will be using this Facebook group to share with you engaging historical content and to provide updates on the new app releases. We look forward to hearing from you and seeing how HH is helping you discover the past.

Thank you

Nearby museums


Comments

NYPD officer Matt McGrath on the beat near Brooklyn Bridge. The Irish man won the gold medal in the hammer throw at the 1912 Olympic Games. He also won silver at the 1908 and 1924 Olympics, the latter at 48 years of age. He was a huge man and part of a group of seven athletes who won 18 Olympic medals and later became known as The Irish Whales. Remarkably all were Irish and all but one were members of the NYPD. Originally from Bain News Service held in US Library of Congress. (photo from my new booK 'The Irish Whales: Olympians of Old New York')
I was horrified by what the Vale of Glamorgan council do to our heritage:
Wish they did a programme about this great man john graves simcoe .
Hidden History book of interest ..... I thoroughly recommend this book as a great winter read for those with an interest in WW2 hidden history and those who love a great detective story. Its non-fiction - based entirely on fact. The book follows a team of modern day investigators as they uncover documents on Hitler's secret weapons chief - General Hans Kammler - and discover what really happened to him at the end of WW2. Conventional history says Kammler died at the end of the war but the authors present documents which tell a very different story. Incredibly well researched and a gripping read. Available now on Amazon.
Nerdily excited about the arrival of the cup I won! Many thanks!
The team is expanding ahead of launch. I can't wait to share the HH project with you all in the coming weeks. Its time to try and make the world a slightly better place.
A interesting set of links to read through for any of you who served in Ireland.