Sarah Myerscough Gallery

Sarah Myerscough Gallery International design gallery featuring established & emerging artists working in natural materials.
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Established in 1998, Sarah Myerscough Gallery represents a distinguished group of contemporary craft and design artists, specialising in material-led processes with a focus on wood. The gallery works in both public and private collections, maintains a full programme of exhibitions and participates in leading art fairs around the world, including PAD London, Masterpiece London, Design Miami/Basel, Design Miami, SALON Art + Design New York, and FOG Design + Art San Francisco.

04/09/2022

MakeGood : Rethinking Material Futures in collaboration with  hosted by 

Listen to John Makepeace OBE discussing the evolving relationship between British forestry and contemporary design, and the responsibility that lies in the hands of designers in selecting their timber. 

This talk highlights the decade-old 'MakeGood' project, which sees John working with the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, to explore the use of renewable, natural materials and promote sustainable forestry in design. 

‘In recent years, the science of complementary materials has alerted me to the potential for complementing timber’s best properties with other materials that enable us to achieve higher levels of performance than had been possible before.

This has naturally led me to a greater engagement with forestry, and a growing concern about the quality of management of extensive woodlands funded by private donations and backed by Government, yet neglected to the point of collapse through the lack of management. Tree-planting has huge potential benefits, but only through management and nurture do trees produce quality timber of economic and social value to this and subsequent generations.’

-John Makepeace OBE- 

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversation on our website via the link in bio.



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02/09/2022

Peter Marigold, Marc Fish, Nic Webb and Wycliffe Stutchbury earlier this year at the Tithe Barn festival.

Peter Marigold
& TADANORI TOZAWA
Dodai Bench (Medium) Original, 2021

DM to enquire.

Multidisciplinary designer Peter Marigold has created two significant collections for the gallery that focus on sculptural design in wood.

Peter's work is in the public collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK. It has been exhibited internationally, including at MoMA New York, USA; Design Museum Holon, Israel; the Victoria & Albert Museum, UK; and 21_21 Design Sight, Japan. Commissions include projects for Bloomberg, UK; The Museum of Childhood, UK; Oyuna (Mongolian Cashmere); Kvadrat, Denmark; and a porcelain collection for Meissen, Germa

Nic Webb
Kumo Collection, 2022
English Oak

Nic Webb carves, scorches, burns, soaks and stains different species of fallen wood to create pieces that explore the natural drama of the material. He responds in a spontaneous, personal way to the individual character of each piece of wood, using intuitive processes to work in dialogue with the timber’s imperfections.

DM to enquire.

Wycliffe Stutchbury
Gayles Farm 5, 2020
Discarded oak fencing on cotton hung on 3 section hinged European oak frame

My compositions made from fallen and forgotten timber are studies in the narrative beauty of wood. They are made to reveal timbers’ response to its environment over time, its un-fashioned beauty, durability, and vulnerability. The origin of the material I use is central to my work.’ ­– Wycliffe Stutchbury

DM to enquire.

Marc Fish
One Piece Chair 2022
black squid ink dyed oak and bronze

Innovative material science lies at the heart of Marc Fish’s Mokume-Gane Console, a special collection created for the gallery. 3500-year old Anglien Fens bog oak is combined with the mokume-gane process, a historical metal working technique from 17th Century Japan, mainly used in sword making. Marc spent four years researching and studying this process, finally adapting it to produce a bronze finish that can be applied to curved surfaces.

DM to enquire.

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02/09/2022

Listen to this fascinating discussion between Corinne Julius, Peter Marigold, Marc Fish, Nic Webb, and Wycliffe Stutchbury, which addresses topics such as the apparent estrangement between artists, designers, and makers - are they any of these or simply ‘editors of an existing matrix’? - the nature of artistic legacies, the ways in which they establish dialogues with their materials, and the difficult question of what luxury is and might be in relation to crafted objects. 

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversation on our website via the link in bio.

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Join journalist and critic Corinne Julius in conversation with artist-designer-makers Peter Marigold, Marc Fish, Nic Web...
02/09/2022

Join journalist and critic Corinne Julius in conversation with artist-designer-makers Peter Marigold, Marc Fish, Nic Webb and Wycliffe Stutchbury discussing the Disruptions of Beauty and Value In Contemporary Craft earlier this year at the Tithe Barn festival.

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversations on our website via the link in bio.

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31/08/2022

Crafting through Digital Technologies, chaired by Anne Warburton 

Watch the pioneering potter Jonathan Keep and designer / maker Gareth Neal discuss the evolving use of digital technology in their practices.

This fascinating, in-depth conversation sheds light on the debates around uses of digital technology: they argue for its understanding as an ‘add on tool’, deserving of a legitimate place in the history and future of human tool use and challenge the misconception that the hand is the only acceptable way of making.

The makers explain their individual approaches to new technology. Gareth Neal expands on the making of his sand vessels and the challenges they present. Jonathan Keep delves into how nature remains an inspiration for his algorithmic coded forms and how he blends tradition and innovation.

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversations on our website via the link in bio.

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31/08/2022

Jonathan Keep and Gareth Neal earlier this year at the Tithe Barn Festival.

Jonathan Keep
Mandelbulb Urn II, 2021

Low stoneware clay and glaze, computer guided coil built from coded 3D drawing.
Interested in natural processes, patterns and systems, Jonathan has developed a working process whereby the shapes of his forms are created in computer code. This digital information is passed to a studio based 3D printer that layer by layer prints out the form – a sort of mechanical pottery coil building. 

After printing the ceramic is fired and glazed in the normal way. He is a leading exponent of studio based ceramic 3D printing and has been invited to lecture or present workshops in over forty institutions in more than twenty countries.

DM to enquire.
Gareth Neal
SiO2 Flat Vessel (Largest), 2020
Black Silica

Gareth Neal’s pieces are concerned with the dialogue between historical and contemporary design. He comments that he is, "fascinated by process, whether that be with traditional tools or the latest computer-controlled router. This, combined with an in-depth knowledge of historical techniques and aesthetics, gives [my] designs rich narratives and contextual reference points, while continually testing the limits of craft and design.”

- Gareth Neal -

DM to enquire.

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversations on our website via the link in bio.

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28/08/2022

Adi Toch, Eleanor Lakelin and Luke Fuller earlier this year at the Tithe Barn Festival.

Adi Toch
In Motion Whispering Vessel, 2022
Hard Gold Plated Recycled Copper Alloy

DM to enquire.

Adi Toch sensitively explores the vessel form through metal; she begins with a flat sheet and fabricates delicate hollow objects using a variety of tools. She finishes her pieces through a labour-intensive process of hand texturing and patination, creating intricate surface marks akin to calligraphic patterns.

Eleanor Lakelin
Echoes of Amphora: Vase V, 2021
Horse Chestnut Burr

DM to enquire.

A connection to the past is integral to Eleanor Lakelin’s work; she is fascinated by wood as a living substance with its own history, far older than our own. Her sculptural objects made in Horse Chestnut are created using a traditional woodworking lathe and centuries-old chisels and gouges, alongside modern tools and carving techniques.

Luke Fuller
Fallere, 2022
Stoneware & Porcelain

DM to enquire.

Every location has its own history, which is inherently marked by human experience. Luke Fuller reflects upon this notion of place, often forged through industrialisation and our enduring dependence on raw materials. Through the physicality of making, his work explores the complex layers of our society and infrastructure.

You can watch the videos of their compelling conversations on our website via the link in bio.
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28/08/2022

Listen to makers Adi Toch, Eleanor Lakelin and Luke Fuller share their experience of making during lockdown.

How has lockdown changed their approach to making?

Has it enabled them to develop new bodies of work?

How did it feel to work on a solo show in the middle of a pandemic?
You can watch the videos of their compelling conversations via the link in bio.
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26/08/2022

Chapter v : The Tithe Barn

In June we had the pleasure of hosting a Masterpiece London 2022 preview event for our community of artist-designer-makers, curators, journalists, interior designers, and friends. The day was one of sunshine, delicious food, and good company, all interspersed with a series of panel discussions. These casual but compelling conversations saw our artists chatting on topics ranging between the drive to produce an artistic legacy, the role of community in making, and the evolving world of digital fabrication. In the coming weeks we will be releasing films of these fascinating discussions, offering insight into the inner lives and thoughts of our artists. In the meantime, here is a sneak peak.



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26/08/2022

Chapter v: The Tithe Barn

In June we had the pleasure of hosting a Masterpiece London 2022 preview
event for our community of artist-designer-makers, curators, journalists, interior
designers, and friends. The day was one of sunshine, delicious food, and good
company, all interspersed with a series of panel discussions. These casual but
compelling conversations saw our artists chatting on topics ranging between
the drive to produce an artistic legacy, the role of community in making, and the
evolving world of digital fabrication. In the coming weeks we will be releasing
films of these fascinating discussions, offering insight into the inner lives and
thoughts of our artists. In the mean time, here is a sneak peak.



fuller_













16/08/2022

Julian wants to pull us into a liminal space of the organic sensual grotesque. His world is one steeped in the arresting beauty of the underland of nature, but that pushes at the edges of western aesthetic assumptions.

The first stage of Julian’s process is to remove the worst of the rot from his salvaged or foraged wood. He uncovers the remaining ‘good’ wood, following the lines of the natural growth, the cracking and decay. Julian’s work venerates these stages of decomposition and transformation. In nature this breakdown of wood is necessarily entwined with new life, a crucial part of the circle of life, yet the contemporary Western mind is uncomfortable with associating beauty, life and new growth with insects, woodworm and decay. Julian’s work problematizes this limiting perspective. He urges us to see the beauty in the whole cycle, all of it is the wood, the forest, life.

You can watch the videos of Julian in compelling conversation with critic and curator Corinne Julius on our website via the link in bio.

Julian's solo exhibition Ash Swale is open at the gallery in Barnes until September 17.

To enquire about Julian's work contact
 [email protected]

The gallery is open
Monday to Friday 10am to 6pm




 
 
 

 
 
 
   

13/08/2022

Chapter iii: Nic Webb

Sarah Myerscough and Nic Webb earlier this year at the ‘Peelings Manor Barn Festival’ discussing the Kumo collection.

The full conversation, along with the other discussions at the Festival, will be released at the end of August on our website. 

DM to enquire









 
   
   

31/07/2022

Gareth Neal is fascinated by processes of making, and has become well known for his novel combination of 3D computer drawing, CNC processes and 3D printing with more traditional wood-craftsmanship. His practice also champions sustainable methods of making and engages in carefully considered material choices. The Of Cuts series is emblematic of these concerns.






 
   
   

 working in the summer heat on a new piece in oak . DM if you are interested in his work:)
19/07/2022

working in the summer heat on a new piece in oak . DM if you are interested in his work:)

 just photographed a stunning new sculptural oak piece in the studio . Please DM if you are interested :)
19/07/2022

just photographed a stunning new sculptural oak piece in the studio . Please DM if you are interested :)

 working on a new collection of sculptural objects in his shepherds hut on the south coast ! Hopefully not too hot 🥵 DM ...
19/07/2022

working on a new collection of sculptural objects in his shepherds hut on the south coast ! Hopefully not too hot 🥵 DM for enquires it’s a stunning piece !!

Eleanor LakelinHomage Bowl, 2021Horse Chestnut burr62 H x 110 W x 115 D cmA connection to the past is profound in Eleano...
01/07/2022

Eleanor Lakelin
Homage Bowl, 2021
Horse Chestnut burr
62 H x 110 W x 115 D cm

A connection to the past is profound in Eleanor Lakelin’s work; she is fascinated by wood as a living, breathing substance with its own history of growth and struggle, centuries beyond our own. Her sculptural objects made in Horse Chestnut are created using a traditional woodworking lathe and centuries-old chisels and gouges, alongside modern tools and carving techniques. Her vessels appear like archaeological objects pulled from the ground; classical forms are referenced and smooth surfaces, reminiscent of ossified matter, rhythmically yield to knotted sections of burr.

Eleanor Lakelin is one of artist-designer-makers taking part in ‘Seeing the Forest for the Trees‘ during Masterpiece 2022.

Photo credit












After a busy installation day, we are looking forward to welcoming you on Thursday!We have been offered a major central ...
26/06/2022

After a busy installation day, we are looking forward to welcoming you on Thursday!

We have been offered a major central stand at the to create a significant presentation for 2022, entitled Seeing the Forest for the Trees. Our curated display will showcase unique, hand sculpted fine objects and furniture made using naturally derived materials.⁠

“These commanding pieces represent an argument for sustainability through their action of longevity; they are first generation heirlooms that will be cared for and passed on. They capture the fructifying sensibility for a meaningful connection to and stewardship of the natural world. They bring the 'outside in' to our homes and encourage us to experience richly the fortifying, essential beauty in nature.”⁠

Save the dates!
30 June - 6 July 2022

Thursday 30 June 11.00 – 21.00
Friday 1 July 11.00 – 19.00
Saturday 2 July 11.00 – 19.00
Sunday 3 July 11.00 – 19.00
Monday 4 July 11.00 – 21.00
Tuesday 5 July 11.00 – 21.00
Wednesday 6 July 11.00 – 21.00

Royal Chelsea Hospital
Booth 206











Jonathan KeepMandelbulb Urn II, 2021Low stoneware clay and glaze, computer guided coil built from coded 3D drawing59 H x...
24/06/2022

Jonathan Keep
Mandelbulb Urn II, 2021
Low stoneware clay and glaze, computer guided coil built from coded 3D drawing
59 H x 35 dia cm

[…] Using the pot as a metaphor for the human body, I seek to explore the psychological will to use the object to express and communicate thoughts, emotions and concerns beyond utilitarian need. As conscious beings I feel we forget the role biology plays in our lives, especially with respect to aesthetic experience. How often do we have a sense of appreciation, of intrigue but cannot explain why. For me this experience is both physical and mental. Pots posses a highly developed visual, social and material language of their own. It is this inherited language, and how as a contemporary maker I can use and reinterpret this language to express something of the age that I live in, that interests me. Language, in its structure and vocabulary reflects our poetic and symbolic imaginations, as in my pots I am not interested in the usefulness of these objects but in their ability to carry ideas and emotions, and to communicate these to others. Intrinsic to this language is the material clay, and the elemental qualities of fire and water - stuff of the earth. I seek to explore the relationship between nature and culture; the relationship between what we make, why we make and the resources and process used to make, as an exploration to understand our existence.’

- Jonathan Keep -













Jonathan Keep in conversation with Gareth Neal for the talk ‘Crafting through Digital Technologies,' hosted by Annie War...
24/06/2022

Jonathan Keep in conversation with Gareth Neal for the talk ‘Crafting through Digital Technologies,' hosted by Annie Warburton, which took place at ‘Peelings Manor Barns Festival’ earlier this June.

Interested in natural processes, patterns and systems, Jonathan has developed a working process whereby the shapes of his forms are created in computer code. This digital information is passed to a studio based 3D printer that layer by layer prints out the form – a sort of mechanical pottery coil building.

After printing the ceramic is fired and glazed in the normal way. He is a leading exponent of studio based ceramic 3D printing and has been invited to lecture or present workshops in over forty institutions in more than twenty countries.















Jonathan Keep next to Mandelbulb Urn I, 2021 at ‘Peelings Manor Barns Festival’ earlier this June.Low stoneware clay and...
24/06/2022

Jonathan Keep next to Mandelbulb Urn I, 2021 at ‘Peelings Manor Barns Festival’ earlier this June.
Low stoneware clay and glaze, computer guided coil built from coded 3D drawing
69 H x 35 dia cm

‘Nature - not objective nature out there but subjective nature within us - maker and viewer is what interests me. Us, as part of nature.

- Jonathan Keep -













Address

34 North Row
London Borough Of Islington
W1K6DH

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 6pm
Tuesday 10am - 6pm
Wednesday 10am - 6pm
Thursday 10am - 6pm
Friday 10am - 6pm
Saturday 12pm - 3pm

Telephone

02074950069

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