Glasgow City Archives

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Operating as usual

📝 Big "thank you" to everyone keeping a diary for our Covid-19 project! Hope you've been writing away as hard as these w...
01/09/2020

📝 Big "thank you" to everyone keeping a diary for our Covid-19 project! Hope you've been writing away as hard as these workers at the City Chambers 😁

Whether you've stopped scribbling or are still at it, please continue to hold onto your submissions for now. We'll post more details on how to get them to us when the time is right. Our website has more info on the project: https://bit.ly/3h5dIOP

We hope to get as many different perspectives as possible, to help future generations understand what's going on in Glasgow at this time.

Ref: D-CA8/708 (no date)

Manresa Pl at Garscube Rd, 1925  Archive Ref:  D-AP9/41/26#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
31/08/2020

Manresa Pl at Garscube Rd, 1925 Archive Ref: D-AP9/41/26
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Time for this week's #AskTheArchivist topic - Charles Rennie Mackintosh.A brilliant and creative architect, artist and d...
31/08/2020

Time for this week's #AskTheArchivist topic - Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

A brilliant and creative architect, artist and designer, Mackintosh made a significant and enduring contribution to the city. His work and style continues to influence and inspire Glasgow more than 150 years after his birth.

Perhaps you'd like to know about CRM's family background, early life or more about his working days in Glasgow? Or something else entirely - try us!

Go on, #AskTheArchivist! Direct message us your questions by 10am this Thursday and check back with us this Friday at 12 noon to see our answers to a selection of your questions.

#GlasgowLifeGoesOn #ArchivesAtHome

16 Kirk St, Clarkson's Court (back land), Calton, c.1910  Archive Ref: P666 #Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
30/08/2020

16 Kirk St, Clarkson's Court (back land), Calton, c.1910 Archive Ref: P666 #Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Pearce Statue and Lyceum Theatre, postmark 1904  Archive Ref: P9774#Archiesathome  #Glasgowlifegoeson
30/08/2020

Pearce Statue and Lyceum Theatre, postmark 1904 Archive Ref: P9774
#Archiesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

View of SS 'Belfri' being loaded with locomotives for Egyptian State Railways by Clydevilla crane, c.1926  Archive Ref: ...
29/08/2020

View of SS 'Belfri' being loaded with locomotives for Egyptian State Railways by Clydevilla crane, c.1926 Archive Ref: T-CN19/331
#Archivesathome #glasgowlifegoeson

Balshagray Ave, Whiteinch,  c.1910     Archive Ref: P9799#Archivesathome    #Glasgowlifegoeson
29/08/2020

Balshagray Ave, Whiteinch, c.1910 Archive Ref: P9799
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Milk Bar, Central Station, 1936.  Milk was extensively marketed in the 1930s by the Milk  Marketing Board  and milk bars...
28/08/2020

Milk Bar, Central Station, 1936. Milk was extensively marketed in the 1930s by the Milk Marketing Board and milk bars, already well well-established in USA, were opend across the UK. DArchive Ref: D-CA 8/1320
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Thank you for your #AskTheArchivist questions this week about cemeteries and crematoria. Here are this week’s questions ...
28/08/2020

Thank you for your #AskTheArchivist questions this week about cemeteries and crematoria. Here are this week’s questions and answers.

Remember to watch out for next week’s topic on Monday! 👀

Q1 Where were people buried in medieval Glasgow?
Local authorities have been responsible for opening new cemeteries since the late 19th century and have also acquired the responsibility for earlier burial grounds. From medieval times, the burial of the dead was almost exclusively in local churchyards and funerals were handled by the community, with no religious presence. By the early 19th century, churchyard burial had become a public health concern in Glasgow following population growth and outbreaks of typhus and cholera. In 1925, responsibility for the maintenance of Church graveyards was transferred to local authorities. Subsequently, purpose built cemeteries were used.

Q2 What is the earliest burial record you hold?
One of the earliest burial records we hold is a lair register for Gorbals Burial Ground dating from 1722.

Q3 What records do your holdings include?
Along with daily interment registers which record every burial in the cemetery on a daily basis we also hold lair registers which include the details of everyone buried in a particular grave. Lair registers will generally give the name and address of the lair owner as well as details of all the interments.

Q4 How do I find Commonwealth War Graves?
Glasgow’s cemeteries include many commonwealth war graves. Sandymount Cemetery alone includes around 180 Commonwealth war graves. You can use the commonwealth war graves tracker at: https://bit.ly/3jkMiVG

Q5 How do I find where someone is buried in the city?
To find a burial, you will need the name and exact date of death of the person you are searching for. Death certificates can be accessed at https://bit.ly/2j4sZG6 (charges apply). You may also find clues in newspapers death notices or obituaries. There is no index to the burial records and they are arranged chronologically. Individuals tend to be buried closest to their last address so a note of the address/area of the city they lived in can provide a starting point to search first. Once our normal service resumes you can visit to search the burial records we hold. If you are unable to visit we can undertake paid research on your behalf. Please note, there is a waiting list for this service which will be longer than normal due to the pandemic and our service closure. To be added to our waiting list please email [email protected]

Q6 When did cremations start in Glasgow?
Cremation was rarely used in Scotland until the twentieth century. In 1893, the Scottish Burial Reform and Cremation Society purchased the land that is now the Western Necropolis. Glasgow Crematorium (also known as Maryhill/Lambhill Crematorium) opened in the grounds of the Western Necropolis in 1895. It is the oldest crematorium in Scotland and the the third oldest in the UK after Woking and Manchester. Cremation registers are arranged by the date of cremation and will show if the ashes have been dispersed or interred in the crematoria grounds, or if they were returned to the family.

Q7 Do you have cemetery maps?
While we do hold cemetery maps, most of them show the sections but do not include the lair numbers. You can sometimes find lair numbers on the back of headstones or can contact Bereavement Services for more help in locating a grave.

Q8 Is the Necropolis Glasgow’s oldest burial ground?
No, there were many churchyards in and around the city before the Necropolis was opened in 1833 including Calton Burying Ground and Gorbals Burial Ground.
The planning of the Necropolis began formally by the Merchants' House of Glasgow in 1831 and officially opened in April 1833. Records of the Necropolis include profession, sex, age and cause of death. Of the 50,000 interments only about 3,500 have tombs.

Q9 Do your records include stillborn burials?
Stillborn births were registered from 1939 onwards. Our records do include many stillborn burials. These are often recorded under only the mothers name e.g. ‘Mrs Smith’s baby,’ and are at times not included in the daily register of interments but instead in lair registers or cash books. Once our normal service resumes, you can visit to research the records for a stillborn burial or alternatively, we can undertake paid research on your behalf. Please note, there is a waiting list for this service which will be longer than normal due to our service closure.

Q10 Do your records contain any notable burials?
Yes, many of our records include the burials of notable individuals including boxer Benny Lynch buried in St. Kentigern’s and Walter Macfarlane, founder of the Saracen Foundry buried in the Necropolis. His memorial is photographed below.

#GlasgowLifeGoesOn #ArchivesAtHome
Ref: P1868, D-CEM, P579

The State Cinema, 1311 Shettleston Rd, 1937. Designed by C J McNair, it opened in 1937. Its first film was Libelled Lady...
27/08/2020

The State Cinema, 1311 Shettleston Rd, 1937. Designed by C J McNair, it opened in 1937. Its first film was Libelled Lady, with William Powell, Jean Harlow, Myrna Loy & Spencer Tracy. Now that was a cast and a half!! Archive Ref: D-CA 8/3039
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Before and after, the Trocadero cafe makes its grand entrance to Bridge St in August 1930 serving ice cream, tea and cof...
27/08/2020

Before and after, the Trocadero cafe makes its grand entrance to Bridge St in August 1930 serving ice cream, tea and coffee 🍦 ☕️

Ref: D-CA8/398, 399

#ArchivesAtHome #GlasgowLifeGoesOn

Sauchiehal St at Charing Cross, N.d.    Archives Ref: P9631#Archivesathome  #Glasgowlifegoeson
26/08/2020

Sauchiehal St at Charing Cross, N.d. Archives Ref: P9631
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

It's #InternationalDayDog 🐶 This is a framed ambrotype (a positive image on glass) of a pampered pooch from the Smith fa...
26/08/2020

It's #InternationalDayDog 🐶

This is a framed ambrotype (a positive image on glass) of a pampered pooch from the Smith family of Jordanhill collection.

Ref: TD1/1232

#ArchivesAtHome #GlasgowLifeGoesOn

Wood St,  Cowcaddens, 1910, showing children sitting and standing on steps.
25/08/2020

Wood St, Cowcaddens, 1910, showing children sitting and standing on steps.

Business as usual at the Glasgow School of Golf, 94 Miller St photographed in June 1937.Have you been back to the course...
25/08/2020

Business as usual at the Glasgow School of Golf, 94 Miller St photographed in June 1937.

Have you been back to the course since lockdown? ⛳️

Ref: D-CA8/2067

#ArchivesAtHome #HistoryBeginsAtHome #GlasgowLifeGoesOn

91 High StBow's Emporium; original Bow's shop, with staff posed outside, c.1880   Archives Ref:  TD294/24
24/08/2020

91 High St
Bow's Emporium; original Bow's shop, with staff posed outside, c.1880 Archives Ref: TD294/24

This week’s #AskTheArchivist topic is cemeteries and crematoria!Glasgow City Archives holds burial and cremation records...
24/08/2020

This week’s #AskTheArchivist topic is cemeteries and crematoria!

Glasgow City Archives holds burial and cremation records for the cemeteries and crematoria in the city! Local authorities have been responsible for opening new cemeteries since the late 19th century and have also acquired the responsibility for earlier burial grounds. We hold records for the city dating up to 1995, as well as records for other cemeteries which have never been under local authority control.

Maybe you’d like to know how to find where someone is buried or you’d like to know more about the history of cemeteries and crematoria in Glasgow?

Go on, #AskTheArchivist! Comment below or direct message us your questions by 10am this Thursday and check back Friday at 12 noon to see our answers to a selection of your questions.

Glasgow Cathedral and Necropolis, c. 1904
Ref: P1868

#AskTheArchivist gives you the chance to ask our archivists questions! Each week, we’ll post a new topic on a particular...
24/08/2020

#AskTheArchivist gives you the chance to ask our archivists questions! Each week, we’ll post a new topic on a particular record type or collection. Ask your Qs by 10am this Thursday and we’ll publish answers to a selection on Friday ✅

We’ll do our best to answer as fully as we can but please bear in mind that we don’t currently have access to our collections and our answers may not be as full as we’d like. If you have specific questions about your own family history, please note that these won’t be included as part of the public answers but you can still message us separately about them.

Children breaking sticks, c.1910  Archives ref: P670#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
23/08/2020

Children breaking sticks, c.1910 Archives ref: P670
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Partick street scene, possibly the corner of Dumbarton Rd and Keith St. c.1910.Archive Ref: P1883.#Archivesathome #Glasg...
23/08/2020

Partick street scene, possibly the corner of Dumbarton Rd and Keith St. c.1910.
Archive Ref: P1883.
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Queen's Park Railway Station, Torrisdale St, c.1900  Archive Ref: P9835#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
23/08/2020

Queen's Park Railway Station, Torrisdale St, c.1900 Archive Ref: P9835
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Trerons, Sauchiehall St.l , looking NE,  c.1970  Archive Ref:  D-PL 2/1/2713#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
22/08/2020

Trerons, Sauchiehall St.l , looking NE, c.1970 Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/2713
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Partick Cross, Dumbarton Rd, c.1910  Archive Ref: P9790#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
22/08/2020

Partick Cross, Dumbarton Rd, c.1910 Archive Ref: P9790
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Lyceum, 918 Govan Rd. 1939.  Designed by C.J McNair for Caledon Pictures Ltd. and opened in 1938. It replaced the old Ly...
21/08/2020

Lyceum, 918 Govan Rd. 1939. Designed by C.J McNair for Caledon Pictures Ltd. and opened in 1938. It replaced the old Lyceum Theatre - an ex-music hall, later turned into a cinema and destroyed by fire in 1937

Thank you for your #AskTheArchivist questions about Glasgow's Baths & Wash-houses Here are this week’s questions and ans...
21/08/2020

Thank you for your #AskTheArchivist questions about Glasgow's Baths & Wash-houses
Here are this week’s questions and answers. Remember to watch out for next week’s topic on Monday!
Q1 I would like to know more about the early public wash-houses and drying greens in Glasgow
Glasgow Council established a public wash-house in Glasgow Green in 1732 and there were various drying greens in the City including one on the Green itself. Other washing greens emerged including the North Parish Green which was founded in 1792. Similar rates for washing clothes were charged at each establishment, the clothes being dried in the open air . A small charge was made for those dried on the Green, although clothes washed at home could be dried there without charge.
Q2 Where were Glasgow’s first public baths?
The first public baths were opened in the city in 1804 by William Harley. A manufacturer of turkey-red gingham, he purchased Sauchy Hall (renamed Willowbank House) and its estate in Blythswood in 1802. He began to collect water from springs in his grounds and send the casks by horse-drawn carts to help meet the demands of a growing population for fresh drinking water. A few years later he opened public baths with four pools on the road leading from the city to the pleasure gardens he laid out on the estate. The road was later named Bath Street. He went bankrupt in 1815
Q3 How did the Council react to need for need to provide public baths?
After the demise of the Harley baths in 1816 the Council considered the advisability of providing additional bathing facilities for Glasgow’s large manufacturing community. It was agreed that public baths should be established for the use of working classes, as well as the more affluent. With this view the superintendent of public works constructed a model for floating baths, to be placed on the river, such had been in use on the Thames and the Seine. Sadly, these baths were never built!
Q4 How did the Council use its powers to establish baths and wash-houses?
While Glasgow obtained powers to establish public baths and wash-houses under the 1866 Police Act, it did not begin to use these powers until 1869. This was a few years after the introduction of a water supply from Loch Katrine and the commencement of the operations under the first Improvement Act (1866), which was at the forefront of public health reform. These developments shaped when the initial steps were taken for the establishment of public baths and washhouses in the city.
Q5 What was Glasgow’s first Municipal swimming pool?
In 1876 the old public washing-house on Glasgow Green was removed to make way for the erection of the first establishment known as the Greenhead Baths and Wash-house, opened in 1878. The baths had 2 swimming pools , one for gentlemen and a much smaller one for ladies (and boys on certain days) 27 private baths for gentlemen , and 7 for ladies . The wash-house had accommodation for 40 washers. It was quickly followed by Woodside, Cranstonhill, Townhead and Gorbals .
Q6 How many Municipal Baths and Wash-houses were there?
By 1914 there are 23 such establishments and in 1975 when the department transferred to Glasgow District Council, it was responsible for 26 public baths,
Q7 How may Private Baths were in the City?
There were several private baths in the City. Arlington Baths, founded 1870, is the oldest in the UK. Other Baths include the Western 1876 , Victoria 1878 , Pollokshields 1883 and Dennistoun in 1884 Each pool had diving boards, gymnastic equipment. All contained Turkish baths, reading and recreation rooms
Q8 Use of public washing facilities
Women often continued to use public facilities for washing clothes even in localities where every tenement had its wash house and drying court. They preferred to carry their loads on a day and hour that suited them, to washing in their own kitchens, or being bound to wash at intervals and on days-perhaps wet days determined by other people (the wash-house rota).

Moss Rd, Crossmyloof, postmarked 1904  Archives Ref:  P9832#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
20/08/2020

Moss Rd, Crossmyloof, postmarked 1904 Archives Ref: P9832
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

O is for Oscar Slater! We reached O in the @scotlandara #ArchiveZ campaign, with correspondence and a photograph of Osca...
20/08/2020

O is for Oscar Slater! We reached O in the @scotlandara #ArchiveZ campaign, with correspondence and a photograph of Oscar Slater, who was wrongly imprisoned for nearly 19 years for the murder of wealthy Marion Gilchrist, at the victim’s home on West Princes Street, Glasgow in 1908. The circumstantial evidence used to convict Slater was questionable, and his sentence was overturned after the efforts of many campaigners, including author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Our archives include a collection of correspondence between the two men. For more details see our blog at: https://bit.ly/3g0XPHs

Ref: TD1560-1-3 (transcript) and SR22 Uncat

#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Newton Pl church, Dumbarton Rd, c.1910   Archive Ref: P9759#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
19/08/2020

Newton Pl church, Dumbarton Rd, c.1910 Archive Ref: P9759
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

It’s #WorldPhotographyDay 📸! This 1914 photograph of the intersection of Stockwell Street and Argyle Street (looking sou...
19/08/2020

It’s #WorldPhotographyDay 📸! This 1914 photograph of the intersection of Stockwell Street and Argyle Street (looking south from Glassford Street), shows a busy, traffic congested scene. It was taken to support evidence for the extension of the City’s tramway system.

Ref: A3/2/1914B/3
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

An exterior view of chemist's shop, GS Kitchin, with 3 staff members in the doorway, 116 Nithsdale Rd, Pollokshields. c....
18/08/2020

An exterior view of chemist's shop, GS Kitchin, with 3 staff members in the doorway, 116 Nithsdale Rd, Pollokshields. c.1930. (Archive ref: P9705).
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Glasgow Corporation’s Office Of Public Works working on repaving at West George Street (looking east) in 1925 🚧 🛑 👷 Ref:...
18/08/2020

Glasgow Corporation’s Office Of Public Works working on repaving at West George Street (looking east) in 1925 🚧 🛑 👷

Ref: D-OPW/76/10/1
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Second-hand clothing for sale from barrows in the Calton, c 1916. The barrow appears to have name McIver on side. Maggie...
17/08/2020

Second-hand clothing for sale from barrows in the Calton, c 1916. The barrow appears to have name McIver on side. Maggie McIver hired out barrows. In 1923 she acquired this site near Moncur St & established The Barras there. Archives Ref: P9109
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

#AskTheArchivist… Baths & Wash-houses , 'The Steamie'Glasgow's oldest public wash-house  was open in 1732 in Glasgow Gre...
17/08/2020

#AskTheArchivist… Baths & Wash-houses , 'The Steamie'
Glasgow's oldest public wash-house was open in 1732 in Glasgow Green. Besides this, there were two public washing houses situated on the north west- bank of the Molendinar, one of them being private property and the other belonging to a charity. There was no public baths in the city until 1800.

Under the Glasgow Police act of 1866 the police authority acquired the powers to establish baths and wash-houses. The corporation appears not to have done anything else in regard to the erection and equipment of bathing establishments until 1869. In 1876 the old public wash-house in the Green was removed to make way for the erection of the first existing establishments, known as the Green-head baths and wash-house which opened two years later. The wash-house had accommodation for 40 washers.

The Baths and Wash-house collection (D-BW) includes photographs of baths and wash-houses, (c 1920); press cuttings books, 1898-1956; file of notes, correspondence, posters and press cuttings concerning the development of public baths and wash-houses in Glasgow, 1900-1937. We also hold the annual reports of the Department and many architectural drawings

Would you like to know more about the history of Glasgow’s Baths and Wash-houses ? Go on, #AskTheArchivist! Direct message us your questions by 10am this Thursday and check back with us this Friday at 12 noon to see our answers to a selection of your questions.

Picture shows Townhead Baths c.1920 Archie Ref: D-BW1/3

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Mitchell Library, 201 North Street
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Comments

Hi There, Do you have any information on a fire at the Glasgow Cathedral in the early 1900's. I had posted a photograph of the Cathedral from around 1904 on one of the Glasgow groups and some one posted a photo of a box made from wood from the cathedral beams. The date on the box is 1908. This was the photo I posted
I really enjoyed your article on Libraries in today's Evening Times-well done to all concerned at Glasgow City Archives for another Ask the Archivist success!
I have ancestors that in 1851 lived at 48 Stockwell. After marriage in 1861 one of the daughters and her brother lived at “105 Stockwell Buchanan Court”. Does that mean that Buchanan Court was on Stockwell at #105? Where do I look on an old map of Glasgow? Thanks.
Does anyone have any Pictures of the old YMCA Building in Peel Street , Partick.
Have a lovely day.
I took a wee detour and some different options on my Saturday exercise, capturing pics from what is usually the other side of the Watter for me. In the process it was an opportunity to snap some vessels that spanned several generations of shipbuilding.
thro this site can we check parish records? My husbands family lived in Govan and his grandfather worked on the ship building on the Clyde
Who can help me with crematorium records of my grandfather died Possilpark Glasgow 1949. cannot find where or what happened to his remains. thank you E McAlister Northern Ireland
Hi I’ve recently discovered many links with Hart Street in Parkhead in my family history. I understand it was quite a historic area, but can’t find any pictures. Would you have any information/pictures in the archives? Thanks in advance
Sorry to bother you. As all libraries are closed - what is the best way to access the family records information. I have been up to Mitchell Library in past and printed off information. As a lot are working from home, how can we access the records. Quite keen to print off gran's info. Thank you and stay safe x
I don't know if you've seen this, but the woman who originally discovered the virus came from Glasgow and I thought you'd be interested in reading about her https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-52278716?fbclid=IwAR07CRHTuw60k7Zo6M8i4hDPGmTbhFHo4Q0diMuwg-F5C0569ATrWBfbFDA#
I now know the first search I want to make once post-corona:. It's the little known David Fowler McIntyre-first man to fly over Everest and born in Govan-https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m0007zzj/flog-it-series-16-53-culzean-castle'. (20 minutes in) I'm keen to find out what school he attended. Flog it featured his story with his logbook, photos etc (and thanks to Gordon Fisher from Govan High staff for telling me about this. pioneer I doubt if he attended the local school, but worth checking....