Glasgow City Archives

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Operating as usual

Fancy a cuppa?☕ The staff of Brooke Bond tea merchants, Park Road, Woodlands, c1929.Ref: P7594
15/06/2021

Fancy a cuppa?☕ The staff of Brooke Bond tea merchants, Park Road, Woodlands, c1929.
Ref: P7594

Fancy a cuppa?☕ The staff of Brooke Bond tea merchants, Park Road, Woodlands, c1929.
Ref: P7594

A great find by our colleague Dr Mary McHugh , the Archivist for the Archdiocese of Glasgow, who  has discovered that th...
14/06/2021

A great find by our colleague Dr Mary McHugh , the Archivist for the Archdiocese of Glasgow, who has discovered that there had been plans in the early 1840s to build a Cathedral on the site of the current St Mary's Church in Calton.

Flourish is now Scotland's only Catholic newspaper and the new edition is out this weekend ... free!
The June paper is packed with interesting articles - don't miss the late Monsignor Gaetano Rossi's wartime diary, and read all about the ordination of two new deacons for Glasgow this month.
Fr Jim Lawlor goes on a spiritual staycation in the Western Isles, Fr Joe Sullivan writes about how streaming Mass via internet has challenged him and Fr Tom Kilbride has some great insights into the Mass readings this month.
And of course there is the story of the Cathedral that was never built ...
Pick up your copy in churches this weekend, and feel free to take a few copies for those who can't manage to Mass.
PS - if you can't wait the online edition is here! www.flourishnewspaper.co.uk

📢 New online resource for family historians!Following a year-long transcription project, we're delighted to release an i...
14/06/2021

📢 New online resource for family historians!

Following a year-long transcription project, we're delighted to release an index to Glasgow's 1920 Absent Voters List. This fantastic database will be of interest to those whose ancestors served in the First World War and contains the names of more than 13,000 men and women who lived in Glasgow.

The Absent Voters List is a register of those who were absent from home but eligible to vote. This makes it an excellent source of information about those serving in the forces, merchant seamen and other occupations supporting the war effort.

Find out more and search it at: https://bit.ly/3grNWoF

📢 New online resource for family historians!

Following a year-long transcription project, we're delighted to release an index to Glasgow's 1920 Absent Voters List. This fantastic database will be of interest to those whose ancestors served in the First World War and contains the names of more than 13,000 men and women who lived in Glasgow.

The Absent Voters List is a register of those who were absent from home but eligible to vote. This makes it an excellent source of information about those serving in the forces, merchant seamen and other occupations supporting the war effort.

Find out more and search it at: https://bit.ly/3grNWoF

Ruchill Hospital courtyard, c.1922Ruchill Hospital for infectious diseases was designed by the City Engineer A B McDonal...
13/06/2021

Ruchill Hospital courtyard, c.1922
Ruchill Hospital for infectious diseases was designed by the City Engineer A B McDonald and was opened in 1900 by Princess Christian, a daughter of Queen Victoria. Archive Ref: P5674
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Ruchill Hospital courtyard, c.1922
Ruchill Hospital for infectious diseases was designed by the City Engineer A B McDonald and was opened in 1900 by Princess Christian, a daughter of Queen Victoria. Archive Ref: P5674
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Bath St, 1964, at intersection with Hope St, showing Watt Brothers  Archive Ref:  D-PL 2/1/87#Archivesathome #glasgowlif...
13/06/2021

Bath St, 1964, at intersection with Hope St, showing Watt Brothers Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/87
#Archivesathome #glasgowlifegoeson

Bath St, 1964, at intersection with Hope St, showing Watt Brothers Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/87
#Archivesathome #glasgowlifegoeson

Bridgeton, 1909Sacred Heart School, class photograph  Archive Ref:  P7549#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
12/06/2021

Bridgeton, 1909
Sacred Heart School, class photograph Archive Ref: P7549
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Bridgeton, 1909
Sacred Heart School, class photograph Archive Ref: P7549
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Warwick St, Gorbals, 1917, showing St  John's RC School with children outside   Archive Ref:  P15#Archivesathome #Glasgo...
12/06/2021

Warwick St, Gorbals, 1917, showing St John's RC School with children outside Archive Ref: P15
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Warwick St, Gorbals, 1917, showing St John's RC School with children outside Archive Ref: P15
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

City Bakeries, 1016 Cathcart Road, June 1931. City Bakeries provided the sweet treats for many a celebration in the city...
11/06/2021

City Bakeries, 1016 Cathcart Road, June 1931.

City Bakeries provided the sweet treats for many a celebration in the city and beyond. As well as selling birthday, wedding and Hallowe’en cakes, they had a wide selection of pastries, scones and biscuits. At the time this photo was taken, there were more than sixty branches of City Bakeries and it had become one of the largest retail bakers in Britain.

Archive ref: D-CA8/618

City Bakeries, 1016 Cathcart Road, June 1931.

City Bakeries provided the sweet treats for many a celebration in the city and beyond. As well as selling birthday, wedding and Hallowe’en cakes, they had a wide selection of pastries, scones and biscuits. At the time this photo was taken, there were more than sixty branches of City Bakeries and it had become one of the largest retail bakers in Britain.

Archive ref: D-CA8/618

Buses along Parliamentary Road, 1963. Glasgow Corporation buses date back to 1924 when the first service began. The buse...
10/06/2021

Buses along Parliamentary Road, 1963.

Glasgow Corporation buses date back to 1924 when the first service began. The buses grew in popularity as, unlike trams, they could reach the new housing developments like Croftfoot, Knightswood, King’s Park and Kelvindale.

In 1949, Glasgow became the last British city to run a trolley-bus service. As a form of public transport, trolley-buses appeared to have the best of both worlds. They were powered by electricity like a tram but also had the flexible movement of a bus. By 1959, Glasgow Corporation was running almost 200 trolley-buses over eight routes. However, they were not to last for long: the final Glasgow trolley-bus journey was undertaken just eighteen years after the service was first offered.

Archive ref: D-PL2/1/1611

Buses along Parliamentary Road, 1963.

Glasgow Corporation buses date back to 1924 when the first service began. The buses grew in popularity as, unlike trams, they could reach the new housing developments like Croftfoot, Knightswood, King’s Park and Kelvindale.

In 1949, Glasgow became the last British city to run a trolley-bus service. As a form of public transport, trolley-buses appeared to have the best of both worlds. They were powered by electricity like a tram but also had the flexible movement of a bus. By 1959, Glasgow Corporation was running almost 200 trolley-buses over eight routes. However, they were not to last for long: the final Glasgow trolley-bus journey was undertaken just eighteen years after the service was first offered.

Archive ref: D-PL2/1/1611

Glasgow Corporation was always offering #SomethingNew in its services. Recognising that the existing telephone service w...
09/06/2021

Glasgow Corporation was always offering #SomethingNew in its services. Recognising that the existing telephone service was inefficient and expensive (especially for businesses), the Corporation successfully obtained a licence to build and run its own telephone exchange and service on 1 March 1900.

The telephone area covered not only the city but parts of the counties of Lanark, Renfrew, Dumbarton and Stirling. The service officially began in 1901 with the freshly-formed Glasgow Corporation Telephone Department managing it. The central exchange and offices were based in Renfield Street with a network of sub-exchanges and switch-rooms spread throughout the city. The telephone wires themselves were laid underground.

However, the experiment did not last long and Glasgow’s municipal telephone service disappeared when the Corporation transferred it to the General Post Office in 1906. The papers of this short-lived Corporation department are part of our collections (ref: D-TEL) and cover 1892 – 1905.

Picture: Glasgow Corporation Telephone Department Central Switch Room, 1904 (ref: Municipal Enterprises - Glasgow)

Glasgow Corporation was always offering #SomethingNew in its services. Recognising that the existing telephone service was inefficient and expensive (especially for businesses), the Corporation successfully obtained a licence to build and run its own telephone exchange and service on 1 March 1900.

The telephone area covered not only the city but parts of the counties of Lanark, Renfrew, Dumbarton and Stirling. The service officially began in 1901 with the freshly-formed Glasgow Corporation Telephone Department managing it. The central exchange and offices were based in Renfield Street with a network of sub-exchanges and switch-rooms spread throughout the city. The telephone wires themselves were laid underground.

However, the experiment did not last long and Glasgow’s municipal telephone service disappeared when the Corporation transferred it to the General Post Office in 1906. The papers of this short-lived Corporation department are part of our collections (ref: D-TEL) and cover 1892 – 1905.

Picture: Glasgow Corporation Telephone Department Central Switch Room, 1904 (ref: Municipal Enterprises - Glasgow)

Glasgow Corporation Housing: multi-storey flats in Kelso Street, Yoker, c1970.Archive ref: D-AP9/16/56
08/06/2021

Glasgow Corporation Housing: multi-storey flats in Kelso Street, Yoker, c1970.

Archive ref: D-AP9/16/56

Glasgow Corporation Housing: multi-storey flats in Kelso Street, Yoker, c1970.

Archive ref: D-AP9/16/56

#OnThisDay in 1868, the architect and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh was born in Glasgow. Among the projects Mackintos...
07/06/2021

#OnThisDay in 1868, the architect and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh was born in Glasgow.

Among the projects Mackintosh completed for his native city is the iconic Scotland Street School, arguably the most famous of the schools built for the School Board of Glasgow. Here it is in around 1970, twenty years before it became a Museum of Education.

Archive ref: D-ED5/29/3/75A

#OnThisDay in 1868, the architect and artist Charles Rennie Mackintosh was born in Glasgow.

Among the projects Mackintosh completed for his native city is the iconic Scotland Street School, arguably the most famous of the schools built for the School Board of Glasgow. Here it is in around 1970, twenty years before it became a Museum of Education.

Archive ref: D-ED5/29/3/75A

A 40-minute interview with Sir Geoff Palmer, OBE, Professor Emeritus in the School of Life Sciences at Heriot-Watt Unive...
06/06/2021
Podcast: Sir Geoff Palmer, OBE - Scottish Council on Archives

A 40-minute interview with Sir Geoff Palmer, OBE, Professor Emeritus in the School of Life Sciences at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh, and a leading human rights activist. The discussion covers issues such as Sir Geoff’s use of archives to tell the story of Henry Dundas’s role in delaying the abolition of slavery by fifteen years; resistance of contemporary historians towards a new interpretation of events using a scientific approach; and the importance of documentary evidence to refuting those who seek to downplay or deny crimes against humanity.

20 April 2021

A great image of paddle steamers at quay at the Broomielaw, c.1900, to inspire us to think of going 'doon the watter' fo...
06/06/2021

A great image of paddle steamers at quay at the Broomielaw, c.1900, to inspire us to think of going 'doon the watter' for our summer holiday this year . Archive Ref: P1796
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

A great image of paddle steamers at quay at the Broomielaw, c.1900, to inspire us to think of going 'doon the watter' for our summer holiday this year . Archive Ref: P1796
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Sauchiehall St, looking west from Renfield St, c.1910  Archive Ref: P1765#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
06/06/2021

Sauchiehall St, looking west from Renfield St, c.1910 Archive Ref: P1765
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Sauchiehall St, looking west from Renfield St, c.1910 Archive Ref: P1765
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Glasgow Bridge, 1914, looking south from Jamaica St  Archive Ref: A3/2/1914#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
05/06/2021

Glasgow Bridge, 1914, looking south from Jamaica St Archive Ref: A3/2/1914
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Glasgow Bridge, 1914, looking south from Jamaica St Archive Ref: A3/2/1914
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Cathedral St, 1963Corner of Buchanan St and Cathedral St  Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/286#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson
05/06/2021

Cathedral St, 1963
Corner of Buchanan St and Cathedral St Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/286
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Cathedral St, 1963
Corner of Buchanan St and Cathedral St Archive Ref: D-PL 2/1/286
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Window shopping 🏪 on Pollokshaws Road in 1935. This photograph is one of many from Glasgow Corporation's Assessor's Depa...
04/06/2021

Window shopping 🏪 on Pollokshaws Road in 1935.

This photograph is one of many from Glasgow Corporation's Assessor's Department who undertook a large photographic survey of shop and pub fronts as part of improvement works in the 1920’s and 1930’s

Ref: D-CA8/2460

Window shopping 🏪 on Pollokshaws Road in 1935.

This photograph is one of many from Glasgow Corporation's Assessor's Department who undertook a large photographic survey of shop and pub fronts as part of improvement works in the 1920’s and 1930’s

Ref: D-CA8/2460

Lovely scene of West Nile Street, looking north from St Vincent Street, full of traffic and bustling with people (undate...
03/06/2021

Lovely scene of West Nile Street, looking north from St Vincent Street, full of traffic and bustling with people (undated but possibly 1950's).

Ref: P1317A

Lovely scene of West Nile Street, looking north from St Vincent Street, full of traffic and bustling with people (undated but possibly 1950's).

Ref: P1317A

Aerial view showing work in progress on the Kingston Bridge, around 1970. The bridge was opened on 26 June 1970 to carry...
02/06/2021

Aerial view showing work in progress on the Kingston Bridge, around 1970. The bridge was opened on 26 June 1970 to carry the new M8 Motorway across the River Clyde. Also in view are the former Scottish Co-Operative Wholesale Society offices on Morrison Street.

Ref: P9091/36

Aerial view showing work in progress on the Kingston Bridge, around 1970. The bridge was opened on 26 June 1970 to carry the new M8 Motorway across the River Clyde. Also in view are the former Scottish Co-Operative Wholesale Society offices on Morrison Street.

Ref: P9091/36

The Roxy Cinema in 1931 🎦 This popular cinema on Maryhill Road had seating for over 2000 people, and the nearby Maryhill...
01/06/2021

The Roxy Cinema in 1931 🎦

This popular cinema on Maryhill Road had seating for over 2000 people, and the nearby Maryhill Barracks provided a ready audience. It closed in the early 1960’s.

Ref: D-CA8/1995

The Roxy Cinema in 1931 🎦

This popular cinema on Maryhill Road had seating for over 2000 people, and the nearby Maryhill Barracks provided a ready audience. It closed in the early 1960’s.

Ref: D-CA8/1995

The final day of May brings with it our final #GLA-ZGOW post: Z for… Zoo!Calderpark Zoo (later to become Glasgow Zoo) in...
31/05/2021

The final day of May brings with it our final #GLA-ZGOW post: Z for… Zoo!

Calderpark Zoo (later to become Glasgow Zoo) in Baillieston opened on 9 July 1947. It was the culmination of a decade of work by the Zoological Society of Glasgow. Founded in December 1936, its aim was to establish a zoological garden in Glasgow. After several sites were considered, the Society chose to purchase the Calderpark Estate in 1939. Work on the zoo was delayed by the Second World War and, when it did open, it initially relied on animals donated by other zoos or by private individuals. The Society expanded to become the Zoological Society of Glasgow and the West of Scotland, publishing its own magazine (ZOOLIFE) from 1970 to 1984. Glasgow Zoo closed in 2003.

It’s been an enjoyable month highlighting our collections relating to Glasgow’s buildings, streets, public spaces, districts and communities. Thank you as always for your likes and comments – we hope you’ve enjoyed learning more about the #LocalHistory and #CommunityHistory of Glasgow through our #GLA-ZGOW posts!

Picture: Front cover of ZOOLIFE, Sep 1977 (ref: TD2089/2/35)

The final day of May brings with it our final #GLA-ZGOW post: Z for… Zoo!

Calderpark Zoo (later to become Glasgow Zoo) in Baillieston opened on 9 July 1947. It was the culmination of a decade of work by the Zoological Society of Glasgow. Founded in December 1936, its aim was to establish a zoological garden in Glasgow. After several sites were considered, the Society chose to purchase the Calderpark Estate in 1939. Work on the zoo was delayed by the Second World War and, when it did open, it initially relied on animals donated by other zoos or by private individuals. The Society expanded to become the Zoological Society of Glasgow and the West of Scotland, publishing its own magazine (ZOOLIFE) from 1970 to 1984. Glasgow Zoo closed in 2003.

It’s been an enjoyable month highlighting our collections relating to Glasgow’s buildings, streets, public spaces, districts and communities. Thank you as always for your likes and comments – we hope you’ve enjoyed learning more about the #LocalHistory and #CommunityHistory of Glasgow through our #GLA-ZGOW posts!

Picture: Front cover of ZOOLIFE, Sep 1977 (ref: TD2089/2/35)

266 Garscube RdLarge group of adults with children at funeral: outside the premises of John Smart, grain dealer, c.1920A...
30/05/2021

266 Garscube Rd
Large group of adults with children at funeral: outside the premises of John Smart, grain dealer, c.1920
Archive Ref: D-AP 9/1/18

266 Garscube Rd
Large group of adults with children at funeral: outside the premises of John Smart, grain dealer, c.1920
Archive Ref: D-AP 9/1/18

We’ve reached our penultimate #GLA-ZGOW post: Y for Yoker. This area, situated on the north bank of the Clyde, was once ...
30/05/2021

We’ve reached our penultimate #GLA-ZGOW post: Y for Yoker.

This area, situated on the north bank of the Clyde, was once part of both Dunbartonshire and Renfrewshire. Despite annexation attempts by the Burgh of Clydebank, it was Glasgow Corporation which successfully acquired the land in 1926. The city’s western boundary was extended to the Yoker Burn and Yoker was one of a number of areas which were used for housebuilding by the Corporation.

Yoker is inextricably linked with the Renfrew Ferry which began operating in 1782. As the northbound destination, Yoker welcomed workers heading for the nearby shipyards including Yarrows. Those travelling from Yoker over to Renfrew were usually bound for the Hillington Industrial Estate.

When researching areas like Yoker which were absorbed by Glasgow, always keep in mind the year they joined the city as this will affect where you’ll find information about them in our collections. For example, there are a small number of architectural plans for Yoker properties built before 1926 which were transferred from Renfrewshire and Dunbartonshire to Glasgow and which can be found in our Department of Public Works records (refs: D-OPW38-39).

Picture: Aerial view of Yoker from the southeast of the River Clyde, c1932 (ref: P564). Yoker Power Station and the Renfrew Ferry can both be seen.

We’ve reached our penultimate #GLA-ZGOW post: Y for Yoker.

This area, situated on the north bank of the Clyde, was once part of both Dunbartonshire and Renfrewshire. Despite annexation attempts by the Burgh of Clydebank, it was Glasgow Corporation which successfully acquired the land in 1926. The city’s western boundary was extended to the Yoker Burn and Yoker was one of a number of areas which were used for housebuilding by the Corporation.

Yoker is inextricably linked with the Renfrew Ferry which began operating in 1782. As the northbound destination, Yoker welcomed workers heading for the nearby shipyards including Yarrows. Those travelling from Yoker over to Renfrew were usually bound for the Hillington Industrial Estate.

When researching areas like Yoker which were absorbed by Glasgow, always keep in mind the year they joined the city as this will affect where you’ll find information about them in our collections. For example, there are a small number of architectural plans for Yoker properties built before 1926 which were transferred from Renfrewshire and Dunbartonshire to Glasgow and which can be found in our Department of Public Works records (refs: D-OPW38-39).

Picture: Aerial view of Yoker from the southeast of the River Clyde, c1932 (ref: P564). Yoker Power Station and the Renfrew Ferry can both be seen.

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Comments

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I've been trying to find a photo of Sir John Lindsay, who was town clerk for Glasgow in the early 20th century, but so far I've found nothing. Do you have one in your collection?
Thank you for the invitation. This is nice all that interesting history in one place
Napoleon and Glasgow: Today is the 200th anniversary of the death of Napoleon Bonaparte. To mark the occasion, here is a little known monument in the Glasgow Necropolis that serves not only as a direct link to him but once featured the only known carved portrait of Napoleon in Glasgow, albeit a tiny and indistinct one. The monument itself commemorates one of Napoleon's bravest and most ardent followers and soldiers, Francois Louis Foucart (1793-1862), whose military career spanned 1808-1815, and involved fighting in the battles of Moscow, Leipzig and Waterloo (amongst many others). Foucart later settled in Glasgow as a refugee after being imprisoned in France for his Bonapartist sympathies and escaping a sentence of transportation to Devil's Island. In Glasgow, around 1825, he become a celebrated teacher of fencing and gymnastics at what is now Strathclyde University, and then at his own premises in West Nile St. Napoleon's portrait was on a copy of Foucart's own legion d'honneur, which was awarded to him for his bravery at Leipzig and later carved on his monument by its sculptors, J & G Mossman, in 1863. Unfortunately, no portrait of Foucart seems to have survived and Napoleon's portrait on his monument has recently disappeared, leaving only the emperor's crown in situ. Many items belonging to Foucart and his association with Napoleon, and his career as a fencing master in Glasgow, do still exist in the care of his descendants in Portugal, including the legion d'honneur awarded him by Napoleon, his sword, fob watch, and silver testimonial items presented to him as marks of esteem by his fencing pupils in Glasgow. I had the pleasure of meeting Foucart's descendants in Portugal a few years ago to view these items, and present some photos here of his monument and possessions to mark Napoleon's bicentenary, Foucart's participation in his epic story, and Glasgow's links to both of them.
Does anyone know what the building on the left hand side of the Old College Bar in High Street was. Interested in the rooftop.
Rottenrow it's in the name nappy pin sculpture and green grass hail hail
On Shakespeare's 457th anniversary (of birth) does anyone remember Glasgow's celebrations for his 400th in 1964? I recall a multi-schools concert but can't remember where it was held.
We have just brought this foundry pot from the saracen foundry apparently ... anyone know anything about it?
I found this photo while going through my late mum and dad's photos. It was taken outside our tenement in Canning Place circa 1959 or 1960. I'm centre front. How many of us were city tenement kids?
Total shot in the dark here, but I am trying to connect with my cousins Carol and Elenaor nee Dunn for both of them. They visites us in Canada and we return the visit and saw them in 1980. They dad wa Doug Dunn and he had a sister Peggy who lived in Cumbernred (sp?). My cousin Wally took me to a Rangers football game while we were there. If anyone has any info it would be apprexicated as my father loss the contact info for the family. My Grandfathwr William Hunter was am orphan at the Quarrier Homes before coming to Canada. My dad and mum are Bob and Mary Hunter. Tks.
Hi everyone, great page by the way. I am trying to find out something about Glasgow from the 1920s onwards, My Grandad was a police man in glasgow and also the port of glasgow and was at some point a mounted police man. I dont know what years but he was born 1899 so would have been around 1920s upto about 1940. anyone know anything about this time and the police force. his name was John Murray