Epsom and Ewell in WW1

Epsom and Ewell in WW1 WW1 Discover the fascinating past of Epsom & Ewell at Bourne Hall Museum. Based in the futuristic building of Bourne Hall, our free museum allows you to come face to face with the local past.
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With exhibits ranging from prehistoric times to the modern day, our permanent displays and regular exhibitions illustrate every aspect of local life and have something to interest all members of the family. The Museum charts the Borough's history through its collections of document and picture archives, fine art, costume, archaeology and social history. Highlights of our collection include Lord Rosebery’s hansom cab, a 19th-century fire engine, extensive Derby memorabilia and significant Roman archaeology from local sites.

Operating as usual

The troops are starting to gather at Bourne Hall for the re-enactment of Kitchener's March we have two extra groups the ...
24/01/2015

The troops are starting to gather at Bourne Hall for the re-enactment of Kitchener's March we have two extra groups the Norfolk's and the Highlander's. They will be leaving Bourne Hall at 10am heading along east Street towards Epsom and meeting others at the Town Hall before leaving there at 11.15 and will arrive at the Grandstand at 12.15. If you arrive there before 12 The Epsom Male Voice Choir
will be there to sing WW1 songs to you,.

HiYet another group are coming on the March tomorrow The Rifles that makes six WW1 re-enactor groups altogether.The scen...
23/01/2015

Hi
Yet another group are coming on the March tomorrow The Rifles that makes six WW1 re-enactor groups altogether.
The scene 100 years ago tomorrow Lord Kitchener and the French Minister of War in the dark coat inspecting troops on Epsom Downs

Here are some more information for Kitchener s March this SaturdayAt 1000 hrs a group of re-enactors set off through Ewe...
21/01/2015

Here are some more information for Kitchener s March this Saturday
At 1000 hrs a group of re-enactors set off through Ewell Village, along East Street, and Epsom High Street, to Epsom Town Hall.
11.15 hrs move off from Epsom Town Hall, with rest of re-enactors.
1205 hrs the marchers meet band and final march in from Derby Arms
1215 hrs arrive on parade ground. They are joined by members of the Army Cadets and Army Reserve
Parade and Inspection
When ready, ‘General Salute’ followed by inspection.
Straight after inspection commemorative service follows.

13 00 hrs khaki only – when advised by Parade Marshall – form up and leave the complex to go to Epsom cemetery to place wreath at WW 1 C W G C plot.
Before the march arrives at the Queens Stand it will be open for spectators with a cafe and toilets.
There is plenty of free parking at the Grandstand.

HiPlans for Saturdays March are well under way. At the Grandstand they will be lead in by the 1st Cinque Ports Fife and ...
20/01/2015

Hi
Plans for Saturdays March are well under way. At the Grandstand they will be lead in by the 1st Cinque Ports Fife and Drum Corps.
There are re-enactors from almost all of the WW1 groups Including The 10th Essex, Queens Royal West Kent's, Machine Gun Corps, Royal Army Medical Corps and 50 members of the Epsom Male Voice Choir will be there to sing songs of the Great War.
In the picture,the march 10 years ago!

On this day a 100 years ago it was estimated that  German losses were now 2,500,000.Also that no company can invite fres...
19/01/2015

On this day a 100 years ago it was estimated that German losses were now 2,500,000.
Also that no company can invite fresh capital, and no new company's could be formed without state approval. Nor could capital be sent abroad
A Zeppelin attacked towns on the coast.
After standing still for all that time on the Downs some troops had fun in the snow with their lady friends

100 years ago India states that it had sent 200,000 men to fight with the British Army, also that the price of wheat in ...
18/01/2015

100 years ago India states that it had sent 200,000 men to fight with the British Army, also that the price of wheat in Great Britain increases considerably. A new picture of Kitchener s March

Lined up on each side of the road leading from the Grand Stand to Buckles Gap, under the command of General Cawley, were...
17/01/2015

Lined up on each side of the road leading from the Grand Stand to Buckles Gap, under the command of General Cawley, were two brigades: the London Scottish, stationed at Dorking, and the London Reserve Infantry from Horley and Reigate. The Public Schools Brigade took up its position behind the Grand Stand, in the charge of Brigadier-General Gordon Gilmour. The officer in overall charge was General Sir Frederick Stopford.

Kitchener and Millerand arrived by motor car shortly before 11am; they got out and proceeded on foot along the road in the direction of the Epsom. Lord Kitchener wore khaki and the French War Minister was in a black cloak over a dark uniform. They did not remain with the troops for more than five minutes, because of the weather – or so it was said. But this may have not been the whole story. The London Scottish, who were posted on the right of the line, had hardly any weapons. There were just a few practice and drill rifles, enough to make a good appearance in the first row, while the rest of the troops had nothing at all. Kitchener knew this and confined his inspection to the front row of the London Scottish. The two leaders walked rapidly along the ranks, after which Kitchener quickly suggested to his ally that the weather was getting worse and detailed inspection of other units was no longer possible.

In all there were 20,000 troops on parade, all of them from the 2nd London Division of Kitchener’s New Army. The soldier...
15/01/2015

In all there were 20,000 troops on parade, all of them from the 2nd London Division of Kitchener’s New Army. The soldiers had reveille at 4 am, dressed in parade order, and were on parade by 5 am. They packed and took their boot blacking in case the shine on their boots needed a top-up. After parade they marched to Epsom from all over Surrey – without breakfast! Two battalions were brought over by train from Maidstone.

The snow started at 6 am and did not stop for twelve hours. From 8 am, as the troops arrived, they were divided into groups – some set on the move to keep warm, while others were stood too, with frequent periods of marking time in order to stall off the chill. The Public Schools Brigade passed the time by singing some of their favourite songs and giving an imitation of a pyrotechnic display, which amused the onlookers, and then at 11.00 am Kitchener arrived. By this point some soldiers were passing out; one of them, Lt Hamilton, wrote in his diary ‘Just as Kitchener arrive I fainted, dash nuisance!’. He was taken by ambulance to the hospital in the Grandstand, along with other soldiers taken ill, one of whom later died.

Next week is the 100 anniversary of the inspection of 20,000 troops by Lord Kitchener and on Saturday 24 Jan we will be ...
14/01/2015

Next week is the 100 anniversary of the inspection of 20,000 troops by Lord Kitchener and on Saturday 24 Jan we will be recreating this event
A photo of the 1915 event and a picture of some of the re-enactors who will be taking part.

A 100 years ago to day.H.M.S.Formidable was torpedoed in the Channel , with the loss of nearly 600 lives. 70 men were re...
01/01/2015

A 100 years ago to day.
H.M.S.Formidable was torpedoed in the Channel , with the loss of nearly 600 lives. 70 men were rescued by the Brixham fishing smack Providence.

The picture is of General Turner VC a Canadian, awarding wounded Canadian soldiers with medals at one of Epsom's Military Hospitals. He won his VC during the Boer war saving field guns from capture.

On this day a 100 years agoThere was an exchange of POW s too  badly wounded to fight.and the Military Cross was introdu...
31/12/2014

On this day a 100 years ago
There was an exchange of POW s too badly wounded to fight.
and the Military Cross was introduced

A new picture from a glass slide of troops marching up what is now the Upper High Street. Notice the ladies looking from their windows. The building at the right of the troops is now the Coop Stores.

Epsom Riot Now the twist I told you was comingSome five years ago a man walked into Epsom Police Station and asked if Sg...
30/12/2014

Epsom Riot
Now the twist I told you was coming
Some five years ago a man walked into Epsom Police Station and asked if Sgt Green was still remembered. He was shown pictures hanging on the wall and was put in touch with Tim Richardson who had made a study of the riot. The man turned out to be Thomas Green's grandson; a Canadian, Thomas Greens daughters had married Canadians and moved there. He was taken on a tour of the sites to do with Thomas and ended up outside his home in Epsom While pictures were being taken outside the current owner came out and asked what was going on. On being told she said is knew the story but did not know that he had lived there. We showed her a picture of the policeman and she paled a little. She told us some years ago her son, who was quite young was ill and she was sitting by his bed. She looked up and there sitting in a chair in the bedroom across the landing was the man in the photo. Who after a few moments slowly disappeared? Thomas was fond of children and did much work with them locally. So perhaps he came back to see that

this young lad was Ok.
The first picture is Thomas green's Grandson

Epsom RiotsSome ten years after the riot Allan MacMaster was arrested in Winnipeg Canada for being drunk. While at the p...
29/12/2014

Epsom Riots
Some ten years after the riot Allan MacMaster was arrested in Winnipeg Canada for being drunk. While at the police station he confessed to the murder of Thomas Green. He may had confessed then because he was ill and had not long to live and wanted clear his conscience before he did. He had been ill as a child and suffered from epilepsy. He was suffering from syphilis at the time of the riot.

Epsom RiotA ceremony was held at Epsom Court House to make presentations to the police officers who had taken part in th...
28/12/2014

Epsom Riot

A ceremony was held at Epsom Court House to make presentations to the police officers who had taken part in the defence of the police station. The 24 presentations were made by Lord Rosebery. Some of the officers were in mufti having retired from the force since the riot. Lord Rosebery gave each a gold watch or gold chain with medallions inscribed “As a token of public appreciation of the gallant fight by the Epsom Police 17th. June 1919.” Inspector Pawley was presented with a clock and his son Harry Pawley with a silver cigarette case given by Sir Roland Blade MP for the help he gave that night. A cheque for £310 was also given for Mrs. Green who was unable to attend because she was in hospital.

Lord Rosebery was `deeply moved by the ceremony and speaking with emotion while seated he said “I wish with all my heart that I could express all that I feel on this occasion but I cannot.” He later wrote the words on Station Sergeant Green’s memorial.

The policemen who were given awards, Lord Rosebery handing the awards out and at the police station family of the defending officers

Epsom RiotThe coffin was followed by four sergeants of V Division and four members of the Epsom force.  Three of the ser...
27/12/2014

Epsom Riot
The coffin was followed by four sergeants of V Division and four members of the Epsom force. Three of the sergeants - Kersey, Greenfield and Blaydon - had been injured in the riot. They acted as bearers at the chapel and cemetery. At the cemetery the coffin had a Guard of Honour of 12 Barnado boys from their home in East Street.

The funeral arrangements were very kindly carried out free by Messrs. G. and J. Furniss. Ex-sergeant Alf Furniss and ex-sergeant Bradley Furniss were friends and fellow veterans of the Great War. Carriages for the mourners were also supplied without charge and the Council decided unanimously not to charge for the grave space.

Thomas Green was a very popular local man with two girls, Lily and Nellie. He came form Billingshurst near Horsham and was one of a family of nine. He was a keen gardener, a member of the Allotment Association, and had done much for allotment holders locally. He was greatly loved by local children who took up a collection of pennies to buy him flowers. Local girls carried handfuls of flowers that they had picked themselves.

Epsom RiotRemarkable scenes were witnessed at the funeral of Station Sergeant Thomas Green.  The whole route from Lower ...
26/12/2014

Epsom Riot
Remarkable scenes were witnessed at the funeral of Station Sergeant Thomas Green. The whole route from Lower Court Road, where he had lived, to the Ashley Road cemetery was lined with rows of people. The High Street was crowded - rarely had so many people assembled in Epsom before.

The procession, in which over a thousand men took part, included eight hundred police officers and river police, sixty special constables, the local fire brigade, postmen, most of the local council, officers from the Canadian army, comrades of the Great War and patients from the Horton War Hospital. Every shop on the route was closed and most of the houses had their blinds drawn. The funeral service took place across the road from the police station in Ashley Road in the Wesleyan church (now Epsom Methodist Church) to which Thomas Green belonged. The church had also been damaged in the riot.
The procession arrived at the Ashley Road police station lead by V Division Band playing Chopin’s Funeral March. The number of flowers sent was huge. They filled the front room of Thomas Green’s home in Lower Court Road, where he had lain the night before his funeral, and spilled out across the front garden. There was a tribute from Lord Rosebery marked ‘Honour and Regret’. On the head of the coffin was a beautiful wreath of roses, lilies, carnations and stocks from his invalid widow - her writing could only just be deciphered as she was recovering from a stroke. “With deepest love to my dear noble husband who was killed doing his duty from his broken-hearted wife and daughters Lily and Nellie”.

Epsom RiotThe inquest into Sergeant Green's death was held in the Court House opposite the police station, a building th...
25/12/2014

Epsom Riot

The inquest into Sergeant Green's death was held in the Court House opposite the police station, a building that had also received some damage during the riot. The chairman of the jury was James Chuter Ede, who was to become Home Secretary in the 1945 Labour Government. The jury returned a verdict of Manslaughter against seven Canadian soldiers and added a rider commending Inspector Pawley and the officers acting under him for their valour and discretion during the riot. These sentiments that were echoed to the Commissioner by the local magistrates.

As a result of investigations by Divisional Inspector Ferrier into Sergeant Green's death, eight of the rioters were charged with manslaughter. Following the committal proceedings at Bow Street, two were discharged and six remanded in custody. At their eventual trial at the Surrey Assizes on 22/23 July 1919 in front of Mr. Justice Darling verdicts of "not guilty" were returned on two of them. The remainder were found "not guilty" of manslaughter but "guilty" of rioting and were sentenced to 12 months imprisonment. A later appeal was dismissed

A child hands a police officer a note for Mrs Green who was ill in hospital
PC Rose and Inspector Pawley at Bow Street Court .

Epsom RiotSome of the soldiers had by this time managed to enter the police station and effect the release of one of the...
24/12/2014

Epsom Riot
Some of the soldiers had by this time managed to enter the police station and effect the release of one of the prisoners. Inspector Pawley then released the other one. The two prisoners having been released, the soldiers again formed themselves into a semblance of military formation and marched back to the camp. The tumult subsided. Sergeant Green was then moved to the infirmary where he died at 7.10am the following day without regaining consciousness.

The police station had suffered considerable damage during the disturbance and in addition to Sergeant Green, the Inspector, four sergeants and eight constables sustained injuries. The following day the police made an application to the local magistrates under the "Closing in Time of Riot" clause of the "Intoxicating Liquors Act", that all the public houses in the parishes of Epsom and Ewell be closed for the sale of intoxicating drink until the following Monday. This was granted and in addition all the clubs in the District were also closed. The order remained in force until the Thursday when it was confirmed that the military authorities had placed the town out of bounds.
The wrecked Police station under guard

Epsom RiotEvery window in the front of the building by now had been broken and Inspector Pawely's family, who had been a...
23/12/2014

Epsom Riot

Every window in the front of the building by now had been broken and Inspector Pawely's family, who had been asleep in the Inspector's quarters on the first floor, had been moved to the rear of the building. The temper of the mob turned even uglier, threatening to burn the building down and continuing to shower it with various missiles. The officers inside the station had by now received some reinforcements, as summoned by telephone - one station sergeant, two sergeants, and ten constables from other stations, as well as some of the off-duty Epsom officers who had arrived and had managed to enter the building through the rear windows.

Deciding that offence was the best means of defence, Inspector Pawley, Station Sergeant Green and seven or eight other officers charged into the crowd and succeeded in clearing the garden temporarily of the mob. Regretfully during this charge Sergeant Green was felled by a blow from some heavy object to the side of the head. He was carried unconscious to a house at the other side of the road until after the affray.

The damaged Police cells

Epsom RiotRealizing the vulnerability of the Officers in the open. Inspector Pawley sensibly withdrew his men into the s...
22/12/2014

Epsom Riot
Realizing the vulnerability of the Officers in the open. Inspector Pawley sensibly withdrew his men into the station, closing the doors and posting officers at the windows to prevent entry. A number of the soldiers now tore rails off a fence outside the Wesleyan Soldier's Institute on the opposite side of the road. A number of others pulled out the iron railings from the front of the Police Station forecourt. The mob having smashed down the larger of the two garden gates, then attempted to enter the garden fronting the station building, presumably with the intention of storming the building to release the prisoners. Due to their large numbers this proved a difficult manoeuvre but some did get into the garden, the flagstone path was broken up providing the rioters with even further missiles

The pictures show damage to the fence and to the Wesleyan Soldiers Institute .

The Hearing the shouting and the bugles. Inspector Pawley called together all his men present - three sergeants, and sev...
21/12/2014

The Hearing the shouting and the bugles. Inspector Pawley called together all his men present - three sergeants, and seven constables - and they formed a line across the front of the station. He then went to the gate and attempted to get the soldiers to disperse, warning them not to do anything they would later regret, saying that an ambulance had been summoned to take the soldier prisoners back to their camp. He was shouted down by the soldiers, yelling for the prisoners to be released. A Major Ross arrived from the camp and added his voice to the Inspector's saying that he personally would escort the prisoners back to the camp. The mob were not disposed to listen to reason. Their mood turned uglier and a barrage of bricks, stones and pieces of wood rained down on the police line and the mob surged toward the Police Station.
Epsom Police Station at the time of the riot

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