Anatomical Museum, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, The University of Edinburgh

Anatomical Museum, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, The University of Edinburgh Displays reflect anatomy teaching from the 18th century to the present day and include human remains, zoology, anatomy teaching models, phrenology busts and masks and artwork.
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The Anatomical Museum, founded and developed by the Monro dynasty, flourished under Sir William Turner, Professor of Anatomy from 1867 to 1903, and Principal of the University from 1903 to 1917. Turner had broad interests in evolution and comparative anatomy and built up the impressive collections displayed. The splendid museum hall was at the heart of the new Medical School designed by the archit

The Anatomical Museum, founded and developed by the Monro dynasty, flourished under Sir William Turner, Professor of Anatomy from 1867 to 1903, and Principal of the University from 1903 to 1917. Turner had broad interests in evolution and comparative anatomy and built up the impressive collections displayed. The splendid museum hall was at the heart of the new Medical School designed by the archit

Operating as usual

It's been a while since we posted a puzzle so here is a 20 word anagram for the weekend. There are two versions posted h...
31/07/2021

It's been a while since we posted a puzzle so here is a 20 word anagram for the weekend. There are two versions posted here; one with clues (down the right hand side) and one without for those that want more of a challenge! Enjoy!

Collections Uncovered.Here is the second research blog from history student Daisy Chamberlain. She has continued to unco...
27/07/2021
Collections Uncovered: The Third Ashanti Expedition (1900) by Daisy Chamberlain.

Collections Uncovered.

Here is the second research blog from history student Daisy Chamberlain. She has continued to uncover the stories around some of our 19th century remains that we care for at the Anatomical Museum.

https://anatomicalmuseum.wordpress.com/2021/07/02/collections-uncovered-the-third-ashanti-expedition-1900-by-daisy-chamberlain/

This is my second blog looking at skulls in the African collection which were stolen from the sites of colonial wars. This blog focuses on the skull labelled in the collection as XXVI D 21, which i…

Collections Uncovered.Here is the first research blog from history student Daisy Chamberlain. She has uncovered the stor...
04/06/2021
Collections Uncovered: Omdurman Battlefield Skulls

Collections Uncovered.

Here is the first research blog from history student Daisy Chamberlain. She has uncovered the story of some of our 19th century remains that we care for here at the Anatomical Museum.

https://anatomicalmuseum.wordpress.com/2021/05/25/collections-uncovered-omdurman-battlefield-skulls/

In the first of a series of three blogs, Daisy Chamberlain reports on the results of her investigation into the skull collection at the museum. Opening the doors – Daisy Chamberlain’s r…

Perhaps you or a friend or family member would be  interested in the following event? Light on OI (Brittle Bone Disease)...
31/05/2021
Institute of Genetics & Cancer - Shining a Light on Osteogenesis imperfecta

Perhaps you or a friend or family member would be interested in the following event?

Light on OI (Brittle Bone Disease)
People living with genetic disorders and their families are at the heart of research at the Institute of Genetics and Cancer at the University of Edinburgh. Join us for this online event to find out about our research on Osteogenesis imperfecta (Brittle Bone Disease). Hear from the Principal Investigator for the TOPaZ Trial, a patient sharing their experiences and insights of living with this rare bone condition and what our research and the TOPaZ Trial means to them and advocates from the Brittle Bone Society and Osteogenesis Imperfecta Federation Europe (OIFE).

Book via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/institute-of-genetics-cancer-shining-a-light-on-osteogenesis-imperfecta-tickets-154916839437

Institute of Genetics and Cancer Public Engagement ONLINE EVENT - People Living with Osteogenesis imperfecta (Brittle Bone Disease)

We have new blog post! One of our guest bloggers, Michael T. Tracy has discovered he is a distant relative of Prof John ...
14/05/2021
Putting Professor John Goodsir in the picture by Michael T. Tracy

We have new blog post! One of our guest bloggers, Michael T. Tracy has discovered he is a distant relative of Prof John Goodsir. You can read more about his story here.

https://anatomicalmuseum.wordpress.com/2021/05/11/putting-professor-john-goodsir-in-the-picture-by-michael-t-tracy/

Anyone who has researched their family history will also appreciate the thrill of finding a previously unknown photograph of a family member. Our guest blogger Michael Tracy, the relative of The Un…

Here are the answers to our first set of Anatomical anagrams posted on the 2nd April.
09/04/2021

Here are the answers to our first set of Anatomical anagrams posted on the 2nd April.

Here are the answers to our first set of Anatomical anagrams posted on the 2nd April.

An ‘exploded’ skullThis young horse skull has been prepared to show an ‘exploded’ view of the bones. This technique work...
06/04/2021

An ‘exploded’ skull

This young horse skull has been prepared to show an ‘exploded’ view of the bones. This technique works best on young specimens because the sutures of each bone had not yet fused together. Donated by a veterinary surgeon, it is a superb example of the quality of teaching specimens acquired by the museum for teaching anatomy in the late 19th century.

Anatomical Museum (Zoology) 3236

The mystery egg! The Anatomical Museum collection holds a single bird egg but sadly no accompanying donor details or eve...
04/04/2021

The mystery egg!

The Anatomical Museum collection holds a single bird egg but sadly no accompanying donor details or even a date of acquisition! What we can tell you that it measures 11cm long by 6cm at its widest diameter and being an off white colour, it is most likely a species of Swan.

Anatomical Museum (Zoology) 5038

The mystery egg!

The Anatomical Museum collection holds a single bird egg but sadly no accompanying donor details or even a date of acquisition! What we can tell you that it measures 11cm long by 6cm at its widest diameter and being an off white colour, it is most likely a species of Swan.

Anatomical Museum (Zoology) 5038

The Anatomical Museum Anagram ChallengeSuitable for all the family. Inspired by the displays in the museum this new puzz...
02/04/2021

The Anatomical Museum Anagram Challenge

Suitable for all the family. Inspired by the displays in the museum this new puzzle contains 20 words for you to unscramble. Some of the words are anatomical terms and others are zoology specimens on display in the museum. Can you unscramble them?

The answers will be posted on Friday 9th April at 10am.

The Anatomical Museum Anagram Challenge

Suitable for all the family. Inspired by the displays in the museum this new puzzle contains 20 words for you to unscramble. Some of the words are anatomical terms and others are zoology specimens on display in the museum. Can you unscramble them?

The answers will be posted on Friday 9th April at 10am.

Hemlock (Conium maculatum), 19th centurySpringtime is the catalyst for plant growth and the germination of seeds. The Ph...
01/04/2021

Hemlock (Conium maculatum), 19th century

Springtime is the catalyst for plant growth and the germination of seeds. The Pharmacology collection holds examples of plants grown for commercial use or gathered from the wild and processed for medicinal treatments or have a natural poison.

Growing rapidly in spring throughout Europe, these examples of hemlock were collected from Arthur’s Seat (the extinct volcano in Holyrood Park, Edinburgh, Scotland) in 1835.

Hemlock contains a deadly alkaloid which, if eaten, results in respiratory and kidney failure. In 399 BC the Greek philosopher Socrates was put on trial and sentenced to death for corruption and impiety. He chose to drink a deadly mixture containing hemlock.

Anatomical Museum (Pharmacology) 5978

Hemlock (Conium maculatum), 19th century

Springtime is the catalyst for plant growth and the germination of seeds. The Pharmacology collection holds examples of plants grown for commercial use or gathered from the wild and processed for medicinal treatments or have a natural poison.

Growing rapidly in spring throughout Europe, these examples of hemlock were collected from Arthur’s Seat (the extinct volcano in Holyrood Park, Edinburgh, Scotland) in 1835.

Hemlock contains a deadly alkaloid which, if eaten, results in respiratory and kidney failure. In 399 BC the Greek philosopher Socrates was put on trial and sentenced to death for corruption and impiety. He chose to drink a deadly mixture containing hemlock.

Anatomical Museum (Pharmacology) 5978

“Mad as a March Hare”This descriptive phrase derives from the frenzied activity of male hares in spring when they stand ...
25/03/2021

“Mad as a March Hare”

This descriptive phrase derives from the frenzied activity of male hares in spring when they stand on their hind legs and use their front paws to box each other to compete for females.

Native to Europe, Africa, North America and Asia, hares have a lightweight skeleton and long limbs for running at speeds of up to 45mph (72 km) to escape predators. They have powerful pair of incisors and a second pair of smaller incisors to aid biting coarse foodstuffs such as grasses.

Our hare skeleton featured here is a comparative anatomy skeleton once used for teaching in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Anatomical Museum (Zoology) 3350

“Mad as a March Hare”

This descriptive phrase derives from the frenzied activity of male hares in spring when they stand on their hind legs and use their front paws to box each other to compete for females.

Native to Europe, Africa, North America and Asia, hares have a lightweight skeleton and long limbs for running at speeds of up to 45mph (72 km) to escape predators. They have powerful pair of incisors and a second pair of smaller incisors to aid biting coarse foodstuffs such as grasses.

Our hare skeleton featured here is a comparative anatomy skeleton once used for teaching in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Anatomical Museum (Zoology) 3350

Thorax sliceThis model is one of a set of 19th century plaster casts of the sectioned body painted in lifelike colours a...
16/03/2021

Thorax slice

This model is one of a set of 19th century plaster casts of the sectioned body painted in lifelike colours and used to teach medics how to visualise the body in 3D and the relationships between anatomical structures.

You are viewing the thorax in the horizontal plane and from underneath at the point of the armpits. The lungs are coloured grey, the great vessels of the heart are the ‘tubes’ in the centre, the bones are cream with orange speckles to simulate marrow and the muscles in red/pink.

Anatomical museum object number 3175.

Thorax slice

This model is one of a set of 19th century plaster casts of the sectioned body painted in lifelike colours and used to teach medics how to visualise the body in 3D and the relationships between anatomical structures.

You are viewing the thorax in the horizontal plane and from underneath at the point of the armpits. The lungs are coloured grey, the great vessels of the heart are the ‘tubes’ in the centre, the bones are cream with orange speckles to simulate marrow and the muscles in red/pink.

Anatomical museum object number 3175.

Did you complete our crossword posted on Saturday 6th March? Here are the answers if you need them!
15/03/2021

Did you complete our crossword posted on Saturday 6th March? Here are the answers if you need them!

Did you complete our crossword posted on Saturday 6th March? Here are the answers if you need them!

ANATOMICAL MUSEUM WEEKEND CROSSWORD CHALLENGEHere is the latest crossword crossword. We have graded it as easy to medium...
06/03/2021

ANATOMICAL MUSEUM WEEKEND CROSSWORD CHALLENGE

Here is the latest crossword crossword. We have graded it as easy to medium and suitable for all the family. The clues are inspired by the historic collections on display in the museum and the topics of anatomy, phrenology and zoology. Have fun!

The answers will be posted Monday 15th March at 10am.

ANATOMICAL MUSEUM WEEKEND CROSSWORD CHALLENGE

Here is the latest crossword crossword. We have graded it as easy to medium and suitable for all the family. The clues are inspired by the historic collections on display in the museum and the topics of anatomy, phrenology and zoology. Have fun!

The answers will be posted Monday 15th March at 10am.

05/03/2021

Psst! Look out for our new crossword being posted tomorrow at 10am. It's graded easy to medium and suitable for all the family.

Science Insights Online 2021The University of Edinburgh's cross-college work experience week, "Science Insights Online",...
03/03/2021
Science Insights

Science Insights Online 2021

The University of Edinburgh's cross-college work experience week, "Science Insights Online", will take place again this summer during the last week of July.

This is a work experience week for 60x current S5 Biology and Chemistry pupils to find out more if they're interested in studying biological, biomedical and animal sciences at university. Applications will close Monday 26 April.

Find out more here: http://www.scienceinsights.ed.ac.uk

Curiosities from the collectionThe Anatomical Museum holds a number of objects which can only be described as curiositie...
03/03/2021

Curiosities from the collection

The Anatomical Museum holds a number of objects which can only be described as curiosities and this animal vertebrae is a good example. By cleverly observing the natural shape of the bone, the vertebrae, probably the seventh cervical (neck) vertebrae of a cow, has been painted to imitate the features of a clergyman.

Anatomical Museum Object number 1577

Curiosities from the collection

The Anatomical Museum holds a number of objects which can only be described as curiosities and this animal vertebrae is a good example. By cleverly observing the natural shape of the bone, the vertebrae, probably the seventh cervical (neck) vertebrae of a cow, has been painted to imitate the features of a clergyman.

Anatomical Museum Object number 1577

Women in Science and Medicine Crossword ANSWERSHow well did you do with our challenging Women in Science and Medicine cr...
19/02/2021

Women in Science and Medicine Crossword ANSWERS

How well did you do with our challenging Women in Science and Medicine crossword posted on the Thursday 11th February 2021? Here are the answers.

Women in Science and Medicine Crossword ANSWERS

How well did you do with our challenging Women in Science and Medicine crossword posted on the Thursday 11th February 2021? Here are the answers.

Anatomical Museum Crossword Challenge - Women in Science and Medicine Today is International Day of Women and Girls in S...
11/02/2021

Anatomical Museum Crossword Challenge - Women in Science and Medicine

Today is International Day of Women and Girls in Science. You can find out more here: https://www.un.org/en/events/women-and-girls-in-science-day/

To mark the day we thought you might like our newest crossword. It's rated challenging! How many of these pioneering women have you heard of? Have fun finding out who they were and what they did whilst completing our first crossword for 2021.

The answers will be posted on Friday 19th February at 10am.

Anatomical Museum Crossword Challenge - Women in Science and Medicine

Today is International Day of Women and Girls in Science. You can find out more here: https://www.un.org/en/events/women-and-girls-in-science-day/

To mark the day we thought you might like our newest crossword. It's rated challenging! How many of these pioneering women have you heard of? Have fun finding out who they were and what they did whilst completing our first crossword for 2021.

The answers will be posted on Friday 19th February at 10am.

Hanged on this day 28th January in 1829 - William Burke, murdererThe skeleton of William Burke resides in the Anatomical...
28/01/2021

Hanged on this day 28th January in 1829 - William Burke, murderer

The skeleton of William Burke resides in the Anatomical Museum. In 1828, Burke and his accomplice William Hare murdered 16 individuals in the old town of Edinburgh and sold the fresh corpses to Dr Robert Knox, a popular and charismatic extra-mural anatomy lecturer.

Burke’s trial took place on Christmas Eve 1828, but there was little hard evidence to convict the pair and so William Hare was offered his freedom if he testified against Burke. Burke faced three charges of murder but was convicted of one, that of Marjory Campbell (married name Mrs Mary Docherty).

On 28th January 1829 William Burke was hanged in the Lawnmarket on the Royal Mile, Edinburgh and the following day publicly dissected by Dr Alexander Monro, Professor of Anatomy in the Anatomy Theatre at Old College, University of Edinburgh.

You can read original newspaper cuttings on the trial of Burke and Hare from the National Library of Scotland,

https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/view/?id=15228&criteria=burke

Hanged on this day 28th January in 1829 - William Burke, murderer

The skeleton of William Burke resides in the Anatomical Museum. In 1828, Burke and his accomplice William Hare murdered 16 individuals in the old town of Edinburgh and sold the fresh corpses to Dr Robert Knox, a popular and charismatic extra-mural anatomy lecturer.

Burke’s trial took place on Christmas Eve 1828, but there was little hard evidence to convict the pair and so William Hare was offered his freedom if he testified against Burke. Burke faced three charges of murder but was convicted of one, that of Marjory Campbell (married name Mrs Mary Docherty).

On 28th January 1829 William Burke was hanged in the Lawnmarket on the Royal Mile, Edinburgh and the following day publicly dissected by Dr Alexander Monro, Professor of Anatomy in the Anatomy Theatre at Old College, University of Edinburgh.

You can read original newspaper cuttings on the trial of Burke and Hare from the National Library of Scotland,

https://digital.nls.uk/broadsides/view/?id=15228&criteria=burke

It's Burns night! Today is the birthday of the Scottish Bard Robert Burns (1759 - 96). The tradition of ‘Burn’s night’ i...
25/01/2021
Robert Burns: The remarkable night a surgeon robbed the National Bard's grave and stole his skull - The Courier

It's Burns night!

Today is the birthday of the Scottish Bard Robert Burns (1759 - 96). The tradition of ‘Burn’s night’ is celebrated by an evening of poetry recitals and a ‘Burns supper’ of haggis, neeps and tatties.

Here's an interesting tale of the skull of Robert Burns in The Courier and featuring the skull cast held in our collections.

https://www.thecourier.co.uk/fp/news/scotland/1861537/robert-burns-the-remarkable-night-a-surgeon-robbed-the-national-bards-grave-and-stole-his-skull/

With Burns Night on January 25, Michael Alexander hears about the remarkable night in 1834 when a surgeon robbed Robert Burns’ grave and stole his skull in the name of science.

Monday at the Museum: The Anatomy Flannelgraph Did you have ‘fuzzy felt’ figures when you were growing up, perhaps on to...
09/11/2020

Monday at the Museum: The Anatomy Flannelgraph

Did you have ‘fuzzy felt’ figures when you were growing up, perhaps on topics like ‘on the farm’ or ‘at the seaside’? The Anatomical Museum has an anatomy version!

Made in the 1950s for teachers, each part is made of felt and can be stuck temporarily to teach other. Here is the front view of the skeleton which measures about 60cm (27inches) long and here is a selection of the internal organs that can be placed in position. The instruction leaflet describes the flannelgraph as “cheap and portable and full potential will only be achieved by a combination of skilful handling and artistic imagination”!

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Teviot Place, Doorway 3
Edinburgh
EH8 9AG

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Our Story

The Anatomical Museum, founded and developed by the Monro dynasty, flourished under Sir William Turner, Professor of Anatomy from 1867 to 1903, and Principal of the University from 1903 to 1917. Turner had broad interests in evolution and comparative anatomy and built up the impressive collections displayed. The splendid museum hall was at the heart of the new Medical School designed by the architect Robert Rowand Anderson. It opened with great ceremony in 1884. In the 1950s, the three storey museum hall was reduced to a single upper storey which still survives today.

VISITING THE MUSEUM AND LECTURE THEATRE 2020 - CLOSED

The Anatomical Museum and Lecture Theatre are CLOSED due to the Covid 19 restrictions and will remain so until further notice. However you can follow the Anatomical Museum on Facebook and Twitter.

Please contact the museum directly at [email protected] if you require further information.

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Dear all, I am a PHD student from University of Porto (Portugal) and my research project is about University Social Responsibility and The impact of student involvement. This research includes a 10 minute anonymous questionnaire based on students experience at the University of Edinburgh . You can be from any year and any course! https://inqueritos.up.pt/index.php?r=survey/index&sid=684892&lang=en Thank you so much for the help!
Dear All, I am writing as a Program Manager at the International Conference on Pathology and Surgical Pathology scheduled for Sept 06-07, 2018 in Edinburgh, Scotland. I would like to invite students belonging to Pathology background to use this opportunity to bring out your research at an International level. Also, here is an open invitation for students who are interested in being ambassadors for your university. Do contact me for other information. We provide certificates that have international career benefits for the ambassadors. For more info: https://tinyurl.com/y77hnqle Regards, Scarlett
The 2017 Association of Art Historians's Summer Symposium, ‘Re/Presenting the Body: Between Art and Science’ is taking place in Glasgow next week #AAHSS17! Tickets include 11 papers, 2 keynotes, refreshments and lunch, museum tours and a wine reception. Book here https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/summer-symposium-tickets-34573626648?aff=es2