Museum of Archaeology, Durham University

Museum of Archaeology, Durham University Durham University's Museum of Archaeology tells the story of Durham from prehistory to the present day. Free entry.
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This small jewel is made of silver with gold gilding and a red garnet. It dates from around 600 AD and once adorned an A...
06/12/2019

This small jewel is made of silver with gold gilding and a red garnet. It dates from around 600 AD and once adorned an Anglo-Saxon sword scabbard. The geometric style is typical of Anglo-Saxon art, and also features a triple spiral design similar to those found in the ‘La Tène’ style of Celtic artwork. This combination of Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, and other artistic influences is typical of the ‘Insular Art’ style found in the British Isles during the early medieval period.

This artefact was found near Gainford, County Durham, and was acquired by the Museum of Archaeology through the Portable Antiquities Scheme.

#archaeology #archaeologymuseum #archaeologyiscool #gold #silver #garnets #anglosaxons #anglosaxonart #anglosaxonjewelry #anglosaxonjewellery #celts #celticart #latene #insularart #medieval #medievalart #medievalengland #earlymedievalengland #sword #scabbard #findsfriday #durham #countydurham #gainford #darlington #portableantiquitiesscheme

Final call for our Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition! Last day is Sunday 24 November 2019. You can find the Museum of Arch...
21/11/2019

Final call for our Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition! Last day is Sunday 24 November 2019. You can find the Museum of Archaeology upstairs or via the accessible lift at Palace Green Library in the centre of Durham.

#durham #countydurham #archaeology #dumusems #hoards #rituals #prehistory #archaeology #britisharchaeology #bronzeage #bronzeagebritain #bronzeagearchaeology #bronzeagehoards #bronzeageweapons

Warfare in the Bronze Age may have been caused by disputes over land, animals, and theft. Whilst spears could be used fo...
01/11/2019

Warfare in the Bronze Age may have been caused by disputes over land, animals, and theft. Whilst spears could be used for both hunting and combat, swords were designed exclusively for use in battle. Warriors would have been highly ranked and may have enjoyed a social status comparable to trained athletes today.

#warfare #sword #spearhead #axe #bronze #prehistory #prehistoricpioneers #dumuseumofarchaeology #archaeology #dumuseums #portableantiquitiesscheme

Looking for something to watch tonight?Tonight on ‘Inside Out’, airing on BBC One at 7.30pm, you can find out more about...
28/10/2019

Looking for something to watch tonight?

Tonight on ‘Inside Out’, airing on BBC One at 7.30pm, you can find out more about Gary Bankhead’s diving adventures in the River Wear in Durham City, and his associated research in the Department of Archaeology.

Some of the artefacts featured in the programme are currently on display in the Museum of Archaeology.

The Durham River Wear Assemblage is a vast and ever-growing collection of finds, which offer an amazing insight into the daily lives of Durham people, past and present. To find out more about Gary and the fascinating work he does in the River Wear visit: www.diveintodurham.uk

Velvotigernus was a man from Britain who served as a sailor in the Roman naval forces in the 2nd century. This engraved ...
18/10/2019

Velvotigernus was a man from Britain who served as a sailor in the Roman naval forces in the 2nd century. This engraved copper document tells us about him. He served for 26 years, and was granted citizenship following his retirement in 150 AD. Citizenship of the Roman Empire was an exclusive privilege. There were various types of citizenship, but this could confer the right to vote or to have a legally-recognised marriage. This document, known as a ‘fleet diploma’, was given to Velvotigernus as proof of his status. This diploma was recently discovered in Lanchester, County Durham, and is the first of its kind to have been found in the UK.

#britisharchaeology #romanbritain #romanempire #romanarchaeology #romans #diploma #citizenship #latin #latintext #celticlanguage #archaeology #archaeologymuseum #dumuseumofarchaeology #dumuseums #copper #durham #countydurham #lanchester #findsfriday

How would you feel if somebody said this guy looked like you? Bellarmine jugs probably got their name from jokes about R...
04/10/2019

How would you feel if somebody said this guy looked like you? Bellarmine jugs probably got their name from jokes about Robert Bellarmine, a Catholic Cardinal. Jugs like this were used widely in sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe to serve wine and beer. This one was excavated near Stockton Road in Durham.

#durham #durhamcity #countydurham #durhamhistory #durhamarchaeology #archaeologyiscool #archaeology #britisharchaeology #findsfriday

Attitudes towards death have changed over the centuries, but the need to remember people, and to be remembered, is a rec...
26/09/2019

Attitudes towards death have changed over the centuries, but the need to remember people, and to be remembered, is a recurring theme across different cultures and times. From a contemporary perspective, taking locks of hair might seem like a macabre thing to do, but in a time before photography, it was a simple and lasting way of remembering a person. This Georgian mourning ring marks the death of Anne Stuart who died in 1775. Fragments of her hair have been preserved between clear rock crystal and an ivory backing in this gold ring.

This object was recovered from the River Wear by @Gary.Bankhead and is part of the Durham River Wear Assemblage. Image courtesy of Gary Bankhead.

#archaeology #underwaterarchaeology #garybankhead #durham #riverwear #archaeologyiscool #georgians #georgianarchaeology #georgianbritain #georgianjewelry #georgianjewellery #jewelry #jewellery #durhamarchaeology #durhamuniversity #museumofarchaeology #archaeologymuseum

This early 18th century glass wine bottle used to be plain green. When it was excavated during a dig on Saddler Street i...
13/09/2019

This early 18th century glass wine bottle used to be plain green. When it was excavated during a dig on Saddler Street in Durham it was found with this beautiful multi-coloured sheen. This visual effect is known iridescence. It's the result of refraction, the same process which causes white light to split into rainbows when it travels through water. Three centuries buried in the ground has caused the internal structure this glass bottle to start breaking down. This has allowed air to enter between fractured layers in the glass. As the light travels between these layers of glass and air, it is refracted, causing this rainbow-like appearance.

#durham #durhamcity #countydurham #durhamhistory #durhamarchaeology #archaeologyiscool #archaeology #britisharchaeology #glass #archaeologicalglass #wine #winebottles #iridescence #refraction #findsfriday

Objects from our Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition, exploring life in Bronze Age Britain.  Free entry 14 June - 24 Novembe...
22/07/2019

Objects from our Prehistoric Pioneers exhibition, exploring life in Bronze Age Britain.
Free entry
14 June - 24 November 2019
www.dur.ac.uk/archaeology.museum

#archaeology #museum #archaeologymuseum #archaeologyexhibition #bronzeage #bronzeagebritain #hoard #bronzeagehoard

Museum of Archaeology, Durham University
18/07/2019

Museum of Archaeology, Durham University

Durham Castle Museum and Tours
18/07/2019

Durham Castle Museum and Tours

Competition time!

Do you want to win a free Castle Tour for up to 4 people and receive our adorable Castle mascotte Maltby the Lion? All you need to do is LIKE OUR DURHAM CASTLE FACEBOOK PAGE (not this post) by Wednesday 31st July at midnight and we will then randomly select a winner.

If selected you will win a voucher for up to 4 people for a free Castle Tour (or free entry to one of our summer Self-Guided Days) that you will be able to use on your selected date by the end of December 2019 ,and you will receive a soft toy of our cute Maltby on the day of your visit.

Please note that Castle Tours times vary throughout the year and some chosen dates may not be available due to events or college activities.

Please share this post! We look forward to seeing you in Durham Castle soon.

Most people in Britain lived in circular roundhouses during the Bronze Age. These houses were made of wood or stone, wit...
01/07/2019

Most people in Britain lived in circular roundhouses during the Bronze Age. These houses were made of wood or stone, with a roof made of hides, thatch or turf. Wattle-and-daub (woven wood panels coated with thick mud) was probably used to create weather-proof walls. The houses had central hearths around which people would gather to cook and keep warm at night. ⠀

#dailylife #bronzeage #prehistory #britain #roundhouse #wattleanddaub #dumuseums #museumofarchaeology

‘After’ image courtesy of Jeff Vietch⠀Conservation can help us preserve metal artefacts for the future. This object has ...
24/06/2019

‘After’ image courtesy of Jeff Vietch⠀
Conservation can help us preserve metal artefacts for the future. This object has undergone post-excavation conservation treatment which included cleaning it with a mixture of ethanol and deionised water to remove the dirt and removing some of the corrosion using a glass bristle brush. The sandy yellow colour of this axe head in the ‘before’ picture was mostly dirt!⠀

#conservation #metalwork #axehead #hoard #museumofarchaeologydurham #durham #prehistoricpioneers #durhamuniversity

Image courtesy of Katie Sawyer⠀⠀This awesome replica of Bronze Age style fabric was made out of nettles by Durham Univer...
20/06/2019

Image courtesy of Katie Sawyer⠀

This awesome replica of Bronze Age style fabric was made out of nettles by Durham University student Katie Sawyer! People in Bronze Age Britain made clothes from different types of fabric. Plant and animal fibres, such as nettles, wool and hemp, were transformed through processes including spinning, weaving and sewing. Most people wore tunics, often belted or worn with jewelled clasps.⠀

#nettle #prehistory #clothing #fabrics #dailylife #dumuseums #museumofarchaeology #weaving

Did you know that you can book tickets for guided tours of Durham Castle from the reception at Palace Green Library? And...
17/06/2019

Did you know that you can book tickets for guided tours of Durham Castle from the reception at Palace Green Library? And whilst you’re waiting, why not take a look around the Museum of Archaeology? The Museum is on the first floor of Palace Green Library - you can find us up the stairs or via the accessible lift.

#durhamcastle #palacegreenlibrary #museumofarchaeology #worldheritage

Metalworkers were important people in Bronze Age society. Their master skills in metalworking meant they held a privileg...
14/06/2019

Metalworkers were important people in Bronze Age society. Their master skills in metalworking meant they held a privileged status in the social hierarchy. Increasing wealth is indicated by the way people were buried and the variety of belongings buried alongside them - known as grave goods. These could include decorative jewellery, precious metals such as gold or exotic trade goods. Wealthier people were buried with more luxurious items.⠀

#trade #bronzeage #prehistory #dumuseums #archaeology #metalworking

We are finally seeing the results of our hard work. In this session we got to see the specialist mounts that will go in ...
11/06/2019

We are finally seeing the results of our hard work. In this session we got to see the specialist mounts that will go in our display cases. Each of these conservation-grade mounts has been custom-made to show off a single object. How cool is that?!⠀

#prehistoricpioneers #dumuseums #museumofarchaeology #archaeology #bronzeage #hoard

Workshop session! Getting valuable insight to what goes on behind the scenes. We would not have been able to create our ...
09/06/2019

Workshop session! Getting valuable insight to what goes on behind the scenes. We would not have been able to create our ‘Prehistoric Pioneers’ exhibition without the help of the fantastic Museum Technicians. In this picture one of our team members is learning how to make a plinth.⠀
#teamwork #workshop #behindthescenes #exhibition #plinths

This is what a tin ore and refined tin metal look like! Bronze is made by melting together copper and tin. Tin in Britai...
06/06/2019

This is what a tin ore and refined tin metal look like! Bronze is made by melting together copper and tin. Tin in Britain is mostly found in Devon and Cornwall, and you can see that this tin came from the Cornish Geevor Tin Mine. South West Britain was an important source of tin during the Bronze Age, and this metal was traded throughout Europe. ⠀

#bronze #copper #tin #tinrore #bronzeage #archaeology #bronzeagebritain #cornwall #devon

This is what a copper ore looks like! Copper and tin combined make Bronze.⠀⠀#bronze #copper #tin #copperore #bronzeage #...
03/06/2019

This is what a copper ore looks like! Copper and tin combined make Bronze.⠀

#bronze #copper #tin #copperore #bronzeage #archaeology #bronzeagebritain

This timeline shows some important moments in world history from around the time of the British Bronze Age. It is consid...
30/05/2019

This timeline shows some important moments in world history from around the time of the British Bronze Age. It is considered part of ‘prehistory’ because people of Bronze Age Britain did not create written records. ⠀

#bronzeage #britain #timeline #archaeology #dumuseums

We are so excited about our upcoming shows. Our Bronze Age exhibition, ‘Prehistoric Pioneers’, is open from 14 June to 2...
27/05/2019

We are so excited about our upcoming shows. Our Bronze Age exhibition, ‘Prehistoric Pioneers’, is open from 14 June to 24 November 2019. ‘Wild’, an exhibition celebrating the natural history of the British Isles, will also be open from 18 May to 6 October 2019. Both are free entry!⠀

#exhibitions #palacegreenlibrary #museumofarchaeology #durham #wild #prehistoricpioneers

29/04/2019
Durham University

Tonight’s show will feature the Museum of Archaeology gallery at Palace Green and some of the River Wear objects Gary has loaned to the Museum of Archaeology.

The History Channel's River Hunters will be exploring Durham's River Wear on Monday evening!

Watch for a sneak preview of Gary Bankhead, an expert diver and archaeologist with our Archaeology department, searching for artefacts in the Wear with presenters Rick Edwards and Beau Ouimette.

👉http://fal.cn/AdIC

Come check us out when we open in June!⁣⁣#prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchaeology #palacegreen #bronzeagebritain #exhib...
22/04/2019

Come check us out when we open in June!⁣

#prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchaeology #palacegreen #bronzeagebritain #exhibition #freeentry #exciting #dumuseums⁣

This is a Bronze Age sword fragment. Though it may not look like it now, it was once someone’s precious possession. Swor...
18/04/2019

This is a Bronze Age sword fragment. Though it may not look like it now, it was once someone’s precious possession. Swords were often seen as personal, and much practice was put into wielding them. During the Bronze Age we see a rise in sword manufacture. The sword was the first tool invented for the sole purpose of combat. ⁣

#museumofarchaeology #durham #dumuseums #bronzeage #archaeology #sword #objectsandartefacts ⁣

Selecting specific objects is a hard task when you have so many beautiful items to choose from!⁣⁣⁣#archaeology #bronzeag...
11/04/2019

Selecting specific objects is a hard task when you have so many beautiful items to choose from!⁣


#archaeology #bronzeage #hoard #museumofarchaeology #durham #dumuseums #objectsandartefacts ⁣

Our graphic design artist is hard at work. This drawing depicts metalworking by a Bronze Age man casting axeheads and sp...
08/04/2019

Our graphic design artist is hard at work. This drawing depicts metalworking by a Bronze Age man casting axeheads and spearheads!⁣


#graphicdesign #prehistoricpioneers #exhibition #artist #bronzeage #metalwork #casting #dumuseums⁣

A beautiful Bronze Age axe head. Such tools are very commonly found in hoards, along with other tools and weapons such a...
04/04/2019

A beautiful Bronze Age axe head. Such tools are very commonly found in hoards, along with other tools and weapons such as spearheads and swords.⁣

#museumofarchaeology #durham #dumuseums #bronzeage #archaeology #axehead #objectsandartefacts ⁣

Have you been to see the stunning Durham Cathedral yet? Did you know the Museum of Archaeology is right next door? Why n...
03/03/2019

Have you been to see the stunning Durham Cathedral yet? Did you know the Museum of Archaeology is right next door? Why not pop in and see our current exhibition ‘Living on the Hills’? See for yourself the evidence left behind of everyday life in Durham for the past 10 000 years. Free entry!

#museumofarchaeologydurham #durham #dumuseums #durhamarchaeology #archeology #durhamcathedral

Our upcoming exhibition “prehistoric pioneers” is now up on our website events page! #prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchd...
27/02/2019

Our upcoming exhibition “prehistoric pioneers” is now up on our website events page! #prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchdurham #museum

Exhibition planning! There is a huge amount of work involved in getting an exhibition up and running. It is a lengthy bu...
21/02/2019

Exhibition planning! There is a huge amount of work involved in getting an exhibition up and running. It is a lengthy but very enjoyable process, and we cannot wait to share with you our journey.
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#museumofarchaeologydurham #durham #durhamtoday #prehistoricpioneers #exhibition #studentexhibition #hardatwork #workinprogress #dumuseums

We are working hard on finalising our object list. Isn’t this spearhead stunning?...#prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchae...
14/02/2019

We are working hard on finalising our object list. Isn’t this spearhead stunning?
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#prehistoricpioneers #museumofarchaeologydurham #archeology #dumuseums #bronzeage #objectsandartefacts #spearhead #exhibition #exciting

WELCOME to the Museum of Archaeology’s Instagram account. We are so excited to share with you the daily workings and act...
12/02/2019

WELCOME to the Museum of Archaeology’s Instagram account. We are so excited to share with you the daily workings and activities of the museums and our current exhibition “Living on the Hills”, in addition to presenting this year’s MA student exhibition ‘Prehistoric Pioneers’! To meet the team responsible for this exhibition, please view the pictures above. Enjoy!

#museumofarchaeologydurham #dumuseums #prehistoricpioneers

Object of the month at the Museum of ArchaeologyThis is a gold finger ring dating to the medieval period, c. 15th centur...
20/12/2018

Object of the month at the Museum of Archaeology
This is a gold finger ring dating to the medieval period, c. 15th century. The ring is circular in plan and sub-rectangular in section. The outer face of the hoop of the ring has incised decoration two hands and two feet each of which has a circular hole through it. There is also a simple heart shape which has a pointed oval shape on the left side, perhaps to represent the piercing of the heart.

These motifs likely represent the Five Wounds of Christ which were thought to have protective qualities. In between each wound there are a series of droplets which are likely to represent blood and may have previously held enamel.

Object of the month at the Museum of ArchaeologyAnglo-Saxon material is very rare in Durham City. This is a cast silver,...
22/11/2018

Object of the month at the Museum of Archaeology

Anglo-Saxon material is very rare in Durham City. This is a cast silver, gilded Anglo-Saxon pyramidal mount from a sword scabbard dating to the late 6th or 7th century AD. Pyramid mounts such as this one appear to have been used on scabbards, perhaps to tie the sword onto the scabbard.

The mount is pyramid-shaped with a hollow square base which retains a cast integral transverse bar. Each of the four side faces feature incised decoration which retains the remains of gilding. On two of the faces (opposite one another) there are a series of semi-circles decreasing in size upwards and creating the effect of fish-scales. The other two faces depict a triple-stranded circle or curved-sided triangle. On top of the mount there is a small square cell with a small flat-cut garnet which lies over cross-hatched gold foil.

Only a week left to see our Shattering Perceptions: Women of Archaeology exhibition.
22/10/2018

Only a week left to see our Shattering Perceptions: Women of Archaeology exhibition.

Object of the month at the Museum of Archaeology. A gold 17th Century mourning ring. On the inside of the ring is an ins...
21/10/2018

Object of the month at the Museum of Archaeology.

A gold 17th Century mourning ring. On the inside of the ring is an inscribed inscription which reads 'Sr John Marlay dyed 21th Octbr 73'. John Marlay died 345 years ago today.

The decoration on the ring takes the form of a skull. On either side of the skull there is some incised cross-hatching decoration which stops in a point in the middle of the width of the band. The point has a star incised at that point. There are some traces of black enamel in the incised decoration although it is likely that there would have been more enamel which is now missing.

The English Civil Wars had a substantial impact on the North East. Sir John Marlay was mayor of the City of Newcastle three times between 1637 and 1662. He helped to defend the city during the Civil Wars and after his death in 1673 he was buried in St Nicholas Church, Newcastle.

Mourning rings are known from the Middle Ages and by the 17th century it was common to bequeath a ring or money for one in a well. They are commonly gold with a design in black enamel with the name and date of death of the deceased on the inside

Address

Archaeology Museum, Palace Green Library, Palace Green
Durham
DH1 3RN

Opening Hours

Monday 12:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

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