The Pictish Arts Society

The Pictish Arts Society It is the purpose of the PAS to raise public awareness of the Pictish stones, and to encourage various arts inspired by the symbols and designs depicted on them.
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Membership is open to one and all from across the globe for anyone who has an interest in the Pictish stones and arts

Operating as usual

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post
22/06/2021

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post
22/06/2021

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post

31/05/2021

Exciting news - follow this page for details of the launch of the new Highland Pictish Trail website coming soon. Packed with information about the amazing Pictish heritage of the Highland Council area, and loads of ideas for visits whether you have a couple of hours, a day, a weekend or longer available.

Enigmatic carved stones, lovely Highland scenery, fresh air and the chance to immerse yourself in a time very different from today - what better way to escape from the hassle of daily life this summer?

A new leaflet and a free mobile phone tour are also in the works.

The Highland Pictish Trail project is led by the Highland Council, High Life Highland and Museums Heritage Highland with support from the Heritage Lottery Fund and Museums Galleries Scotland.

A very interesting blog by Adrian Maldonado.
25/05/2021
Rethinking the Dark Age: the multiple voices of early medieval Britain

A very interesting blog by Adrian Maldonado.

What do you picture when you think of the ‘Dark Age’? The common perception the phrase conjures is simple living and hardship. However, the sheer number of inscribed objects from this period paint another picture. Through new research methods, we are uncovering the multiple voices of early medie...

18/05/2021

At last, maybe the opportunity you have been waiting for. Ever since the Conan Stone was discovered in February 2019 only a small handful of people have actually seen the back of it, the symbol side. There have been lots of pictures, like this one, but the public has only been able to see the Cross side through the window of Dingwall Museum.
Now, at last, for the first time since October 2019 Dingwall Museum is opening its doors again. See their website for more information: https://www.dingwallmuseum.info/

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post
02/05/2021

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post

28/04/2021

https://foreigncountries.podbean.com/e/se1-special-episode-an-osteoarchaeology-of-violence-trauma-in-the-european-past/
Brilliant podcast interview with Angela Boyle, who has just completed her PhD on osteological evidence for violence and trauma on excavated skeletal assemblages from the Pictish frontline around the Firth of Forth 400-800. This includes the extraordinary mass grave of bodies dumped in a Roman latrine around 600 in the ruins of the Roman fort at Cramond, plus Angela's successful identification of bladed weapon trauma on two individuals within the early medieval cemetery I excavated on the May Island.
The photo shows Angela re-enacting the fatal blow found on burial 959 from the May, a young man from the Highlands, who was killed around 650 (thanks to Dr Matthew Knight).

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post
12/04/2021

Photos from Peter Yeoman - Archaeologist's post

A Song In Stone
18/02/2021
A Song In Stone

A Song In Stone

Exploring Scotland's neolithic rock art, this great learning resource provides information about Scotland's ancestors and how they developed art in their surroundings.

Booking for online conference now open.https://www.ssns.org.uk/events/conanstone/?fbclid=IwAR1lr1lILesb6VTAh5mbJF1a3S8e9...
15/01/2021
Picts in the North: The Conan Stone in Context | Scottish Society for Northern Studies

Booking for online conference now open.
https://www.ssns.org.uk/events/conanstone/?fbclid=IwAR1lr1lILesb6VTAh5mbJF1a3S8e9nzrbcxez2rLM0SoAqUu3vdofTav9bg

Picts in the North: The Conan Stone in Context The Scottish Society for Northern Studies, NOSAS, and The Pictish Arts Society are jointly organising a conference on 13-14 March focusing on the recent discovery and conservation of the Conan Stone, a Pictish cross slab that was discovered in Easter Ro...

13/01/2021

Welcome to our first #FindsFriday of 2021. This is our best-known piece of sculpture, which is inscribed in Latin. Alongside it is a magnificent sculptor’s chisel found in the burnt out vellum workshop. Who thinks this chisel did the lettering?

Booking details coming soon...
13/01/2021

Booking details coming soon...

Booking details coming soon...

That time Batman joined the PAS.
08/01/2021

That time Batman joined the PAS.

That time Batman joined the PAS.

28/12/2020

The Conan Pictish stone as viewed through the window of Dingwall Museum on Christmas night.

11/12/2020

Choose which piece of #FindsFriday Pictish sculpture you are today; are you a trotting boar, a hissing lion or a rearing horse? Most of these were smashed during a 9th C raid on the monastery at Portmahomack. #archaeology #scotland #medieval

Photos from Caithness Broch Project's post
08/12/2020

Photos from Caithness Broch Project's post

Please consider voting online in the Current Archaeology awards Research Project of the year. There are 2 very strong Pr...
04/12/2020
Research Project of the Year 2021 – Nominees - Current Archaeology

Please consider voting online in the Current Archaeology awards Research Project of the year.
There are 2 very strong Projects with a Pictish theme- ‘Tarradale Through Time’ and ‘The Problem of the Picts’.

COVID-19 has not stopped these exceptional projects from going ahead. Below are all the nominees for Research Project of the Year. Voting closes on 8 February 2021, and all the winners of the 2021 Current Archaeology Awards will then be announced on 26 February as part of our virtual Current Archaeo...

Please vote for our friends at the Northern Picts Project!
01/12/2020
Research Project of the Year 2021 – Nominees - Current Archaeology

Please vote for our friends at the Northern Picts Project!

COVID-19 has not stopped these exceptional projects from going ahead. Below are all the nominees for Research Project of the Year. Voting closes on 8 February 2021, and all the winners of the 2021 Current Archaeology Awards will then be announced on 26 February as part of our virtual Current Archaeo...

Looking for something interesting to read? We've just uploaded 2 years worth of our quarterly newsletters to add to our ...
07/11/2020

Looking for something interesting to read? We've just uploaded 2 years worth of our quarterly newsletters to add to our newsletter archive at www.thepictishartssociety.org.uk/newsletters.
The newsletters can be downloaded completely free of charge.
The newsletter index will be updated soon.

The latest newsletter is from Winter 2019.
Enjoy!

Looking for something interesting to read? We've just uploaded 2 years worth of our quarterly newsletters to add to our newsletter archive at www.thepictishartssociety.org.uk/newsletters.
The newsletters can be downloaded completely free of charge.
The newsletter index will be updated soon.

The latest newsletter is from Winter 2019.
Enjoy!

03/10/2020
Historic Environment Scotland

Well done HES. Well worth a watch.

We’ll be investigating Scotland’s carved stones for our last digital Doors Open Days livestream.

Carved stones are often the only evidence surviving from Scotland's earliest societies. Discover some of the most striking stones, and the stories they tell, from Angus, the Western Isles and Shetland.

This event is rescheduled from Thursday 10 September due to technical issues.

03/10/2020
www.thepictishartssociety.org.uk

This would have been our conference weekend. Although it's very sad that we had to cancel, we have such a good program organised by Jane Geddes that we decided to use that program for a great conference next year! In the meantime, we have increased the frequency of our newsletters for members and continue with online monthly lectures for members.
Please consider joining at www.thepictishartssociety.org.uk
Membership is open to all worldwide. Members can attend online lectures and we send our newsletters out by email.

A bit of early 20th century Pictish revival in a graveyard in Portland, Maine, USA.
30/09/2020

A bit of early 20th century Pictish revival in a graveyard in Portland, Maine, USA.

As you know, one of my all time favorite things to do is to lace up my boots, break out the maps and head out in search of Pictish stones in Scotland. Imagine my delight to find a cross slab in the city of my birth, and to share the search for this one with my brother! Evergreen cemetery in Portland, Maine, USA is huge, and I didn't have much to go on other than an up close photo of the stone which gave me the clue that the ground sloped away behind it. The date on the stone also indicated it would be in an older part of the cemetery, way along the far edge of the woods which my brother helped me find. As you can see I did find the stone, and in a tiny glimmer of hope I did check the back for Pictish beasties but to no avail. While this woman married an Irish man, I did some research and found that her maiden name is a Scottish one, so I like to believe she chose a cross slab design because she was Pictish daft like me. ❤️😂

UHI Institute for Northern Studies
22/09/2020

UHI Institute for Northern Studies

A new book by INS lecturer Dr Oisín Plumb has been published. 'Picts and Britons in the early medieval Irish Church: Travels west over the storm-swelled sea' examines the lives and legacy of Picts and Britons in the Irish Church, looking at their impact on early medieval Irish society and how this impact came to be perceived in later centuries.
Between the fifth and ninth centuries AD, the peoples of Britain, Ireland, and their surrounding islands were constantly interacting — sharing cultures and ideas that shaped and reshaped their communities and the way they lived. The influence of religious figures from Ireland on the development of the Church in Britain was profound, and the fame of monasteries such as Iona, which they established, remains to this day. Yet with the exception of St Patrick, far less attention has been paid to the role of the Britons and Picts who travelled west into Ireland, despite their equally significant impact.
This book aims to redress the balance by offering a detailed exploration of the evidence for British and Pictish men and women in the early medieval Irish Church, and asking what we can piece together of their lives from the often fragmentary sources. It also considers the ways in which writers of later ages viewed these migrants, and examines how the shaping of the ‘migration narrative’ throughout the centuries had a major effect on the way that the earliest centuries of the church came to be viewed in later years in both Scotland and Ireland. In doing so, this volume offers important new insights into our understanding of the relationships between Britain and Ireland in this period.
The book is part of the North Atlantic World series- produced by INS co-operation with Brepols. You can find more information about the book here: http://www.brepols.net/Pages/ShowProduct.aspx?prod_id=IS-9782503583471-1

Table of Contents:

Chapter 1: Introduction to Migration
Chapter 2: Introduction to the Sources
Chapter 3: The Early Church
Chapter 4: Uinniau
Chapter 5: Seven Brothers
Chapter 6: The Dynamics of Migration
Chapter 7: The Development of the Migration Narrative
Chapter 8: Conclusion
Bibliography
Appendix I: Monenna and Ninian
Appendix II: Midlands locations suggested for the seven brothers based on the poem

ISBN: 978-2-503-58347-1

22/09/2020

Apologies if anyone has sent the society an email in the last 2 days- our ISP has changed platforms and they are having an email service outage.

Modern Pictish craft. St Vigeans stag.
17/09/2020

Modern Pictish craft. St Vigeans stag.

17/09/2020
Scribalstyles

Scribalstyles

how the key pattern stone as Groam House was designed using golden ratio rectangles

Modern Pictish craft. Reconstruction of the Pictish Beast on Strathmartine 3.
15/09/2020

Modern Pictish craft. Reconstruction of the Pictish Beast on Strathmartine 3.

Strathmartine 3. A stone that went walkabout once upon a time and was rescued from Jedburgh by Norman Atkinson. Even in its fragmentary state it’s one of my favourite stones. A real gem.

AOC Archaeology Group
09/09/2020

AOC Archaeology Group

Today we're marking #HillfortsWednesday with an exciting book release! Get your copy of 'Hillforts of the Tay' – out today! Read about archaeological discoveries at three stunning hillforts in Perthshire, and the community spirit of the Tay LP. We were delighted to be involved in this fab project, more info here: http://bit.ly/HillfortsOfTheTay Buy your copy from Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust: http://bit.ly/PKHTPublications

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Comments

Going past Auchterarder a couple of days ago, so I thought a small diversion to the other side of the A9 was in order. The urge to colour in the lines of the goose is powerful. The view towards the Gleneagles valley was splendid, but my camera battery ran out!
R e v e l a t i o n 1 1 : 7
The Northern Picts/Comparative Kingship project at the University of Aberdeen has been nominated for research project of the year by Current Archaeology Awards. Perhaps you could give us a vote! And a share! https://www.archaeology.co.uk/vote?fbclid=IwAR2HPT6SMT1PcEffMaBtLbZVbuG2KOz1u3d6s_nRYcfGhD3nUs6Esr2Glew
This documentary is still on BBC iplayer.
I wanted to participate in the lecture on Pictish origins but I can't get to the site. How do I do this?
How do I get into the lecture?
Any news on the Barmuckity stone? Where is it? Is it authentic?
Pictish Arts Society followers may be interested in the latest 'We Love History Live Doors Open Day on Scotland's Carved Stones' livestream. It features Pictish stones at St Vigeans, Aberlemno and Glamis in Angus. Just skip over the first few minutes and the technical issue about halfway. It is available to watch on the HES Youtube here:
What news of the Barmuckity stone? Is is authentic and where is it now?